Handwriting expert Tracey Trussell on how Boris’s handwriting has changed


A handwriting expert has revealed how the changes in Boris Johnson’s handwriting over the past year prove he has become more ‘involved but also more careful’.

British handwriting analyst Tracey Trussell compared a letter written to his former Tory colleague Sarah Wollaston pulling out of an appearance before senior MPs in 2019, to a letter to a little girl who had to cancel her birthday party just days ago.

Tracey told FEMAIL that the changes over the past year include smaller fonts with less missplaced angles, proving that he has become better at listening and more hands-on and caring. 

However she also believes his writing and line spacing becoming less spaced out shows he is ‘more scared’ and keen to have ‘more people around him, as he enforces tighter lockdown restrictions amid the coronavirus pandemic.

British handwriting analyst Tracey Trussell compared a letter written to his former Tory colleague Sarah Wollaston pulling out of an appearance before senior MPs in 2019 (seen) to a more recent one, claiming his writing has become less spaced out and more careful

Tracey said: ‘Some people’s handwriting rarely changes during their adult life, and others alter dramatically. 

‘Comparing these two samples of Boris’s handwriting – one was penned just days ago and the other was scribbled only last year – there are some distinct and interesting changes.

‘Boris has become more hands-on, caring and involved. He’s still gung ho. But there’s more self-restraint, more caution, and frankly, more fear. 

‘He needs a team around him now more than ever, and in these days of self-isolation this irony is not lost on me. 

‘This is clear by how his wide word and line spacing has become much more compact with close words and narrow line spacing now. 

Tracey compared it to a letter to a little girl who had to cancel her birthday party just days ago and told FEMAIL that the changes over the past year include smaller fonts with less missplaced angles, proving that he has become better at listening and more hands-on and caring

Tracey compared it to a letter to a little girl who had to cancel her birthday party just days ago and told FEMAIL that the changes over the past year include smaller fonts with less missplaced angles, proving that he has become better at listening and more hands-on and caring

‘He is still loquacious (talkative), but is now much more inclined to listen too  – proven by more disconnections and writing that is no longer joined up.

‘He has cultivated emotional warmth and become much more receptive to people’s feelings.

‘His writing is now pasty (when the pressure is light and the writing is thick), and rounded, with fewer misplaced angles and more garlands, which means that although policy is still key, Boris is much more in tune with the heartbeat of humanity.’

Tracey also believes that Boris has become more hands-on since facing the pressures of putting in place tighter lockdown rules amid the coronavirus pandemic. 

She explained: ‘Things have become real, and all consuming. Boris still excels at delegating, but now he’s much more hands-on, and keen to grasp a practical handle – shown by his smaller size writing with more emphasis on the middle and lower zones. 

‘His writing shows he’s still impatient with the details, but this means he can get to the root of problems swiftly, quickly cutting through irrelevance and deciding which issues are relevant and which aren’t, without wasting valuable time – proven by his more simplified fonts.’ 

Tracey also believes Boris' (seen)writing and line spacing becoming less spaced out shows he is 'more scared' and keen to have 'more people around him, as he enforces tighter lockdown restrictions amid the coronavirus pandemic

Tracey also believes Boris’ (seen)writing and line spacing becoming less spaced out shows he is ‘more scared’ and keen to have ‘more people around him, as he enforces tighter lockdown restrictions amid the coronavirus pandemic

She added: ‘There seems to be more self-discipline and a desire for transparency and clarity,  shown by his improved legibility, and his more regular and less slapdash writing style’.

She continued: ‘The rising baselines uncover an optimistic, upbeat attitude, but they are overly rising, which means there’s some over compensation going on. 

Addressing the more exaggerated writing in his recent letter to a little girl who cancelled her birthday, Tracey claimed: ‘This is gutsy bravado – Boris is afraid. And the really telling difference is the change in Boris’s left hand margin, which reveals how someone approaches the world.’ 

She explained: ‘A wide left hand margin is penned by someone who is opportunistic and keen to move away from what’s been, and embrace what’s to be. 

‘But now it’s narrowing dramatically, which not only reveals Boris’s caution, but also uncovers serious doubts creeping in. So any enthusiasm quickly dissipates. That, and his continued sensitivity to criticism, colludes to keep him awake at night.’

‘Boris’ more closed and squeezed oval-shaped letters suggest he is now exercising more caution, which means he’s thinking things through. 

‘His simplification of lettrs and loop on the B show he’s less chaotic, improvising purposefully, with diligence, and a genuine lack of pretence’.

 

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