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Gabrielle Union says her PTSD is triggered by the 'pandemic and racial reckoning' - healthyfrog

Gabrielle Union says her PTSD is triggered by the ‘pandemic and racial reckoning’

Gabrielle Union says her PTSD has been very triggered by the current state of the world and she’s leaning on her emotional toolkit and therapy to cope.

The 47-year-old actress got candid about how she is managing her body, mind and soul in the midst of ‘the pandemic and this racial reckoning,’ in a new cover story for Women’s Health. 

Gabrielle showcased her resilience and strong body in a set of stunning photos for the magazine shot in the desert.  

Honest: Gabrielle Union got candid about how she is managing her body, mind and soul in the midst of ‘the pandemic and this racial reckoning,’ in a new cover story for Women’s Health

‘The combination of a pandemic and this racial reckoning, alongside being inundated with [images of] the brutalization of Black bodies, has sent my PTSD into overdrive,’ Gabrielle said. ‘There’s just terror in my body.’ 

The L.A.’s Finest star has been suffering with post traumatic stress disorder for decades after she was raped at gunpoint in the early nineties. 

Gabrielle says that, over time, dealing with her mental health and processing the trauma has become ‘second nature.’

‘I break out my emotional fix-me toolkit, and I try to run through all the situations,’ she explained. ‘I call it my “what’s the likelihood of X happening?” method.’

'The combination of a pandemic and this racial reckoning, alongside being inundated with [images of] the brutalization of Black bodies, has sent my PTSD into overdrive,' Gabrielle said. 'There's just terror in my body.'

‘The combination of a pandemic and this racial reckoning, alongside being inundated with [images of] the brutalization of Black bodies, has sent my PTSD into overdrive,’ Gabrielle said. ‘There’s just terror in my body.’

Bouncing back: Gabrielle showcased her resilience and strong body in a set of stunning photos for the magazine shot in the desert

Bouncing back: Gabrielle showcased her resilience and strong body in a set of stunning photos for the magazine shot in the desert

She explained how it worked: ‘If I’m fearful about going into a store because I’m anxious about being robbed, I’ll make myself feel better by going to one where there will be witnesses to cut down those chances. It’s been this way since ’92.’ 

Union, who has been married to NBA star Dwyane Wade for six years, showed off her own athletic side for the magazine.

Her flawless figure was front and center in a series of photos for the magazine where she struck power poses in body suits. 

While she is juggling being a mom to daughter Kaavia James, one, and step mom to Wade’s older children Xavier, six, Zaya, 13, Zaire, 18, and nephew, she’s also actively working to change the experiences for BIPOC. 

Coping: Gabrielle says that, over time, dealing with her mental health and processing the trauma has become 'second nature' and she has an 'emotional fix-me toolkit'

Making a difference: The Nebraska born beauty launched her own company, Flawless by Gabrielle Union, an affordable hair care line designed for textured hair

Coping: Gabrielle says that, over time, dealing with her mental health and processing the trauma has become ‘second nature’ and she has an ’emotional fix-me toolkit’ 

The Nebraska born beauty launched her own company, Flawless by Gabrielle Union, an affordable hair care line designed for textured hair. 

‘I want to make sure that everything that is working for me is available to as many people as possible,’ she said. ‘We’re not free until everyone is free.’ 

And, she made headlines when she filed a harassment complaint against America’s Got Talent, Simon Cowell, NBC Universal and the show’s production companies claiming they tried to silence her when she went public with allegations of racist behavior on set. 

After she went public with her accusations, Union said that ‘all of these people came through the door’ with similar stories in their own lives.

'For the most part, across all industries, you see the same power structure that existed before George Floyd. All of these initiatives that people are so excited about—if the people at the top haven't changed, and they're not interested in creating more space up here, how far are these people that we're bringing in going?'

‘For the most part, across all industries, you see the same power structure that existed before George Floyd. All of these initiatives that people are so excited about—if the people at the top haven’t changed, and they’re not interested in creating more space up here, how far are these people that we’re bringing in going?’

Now, she is trying to answer the question of how she can use her platform and experience to ‘create a larger movement to address all this trauma and all this harm.’

Adding: ‘I can’t just swallow the information I now have.’  

Union isn’t alone, across the board companies claim to be taking stock of themselves, their treatment of BIPOC and issues with diversity and racial equality. But, until action is taken, Gabrielle says it’s all talk. 

‘I’m not going to factor in change I have yet to see,’ the Bring it On star said. ‘For the most part, across all industries, you see the same power structure that existed before George Floyd. 

‘All of these initiatives that people are so excited about—if the people at the top haven’t changed, and they’re not interested in creating more space up here, how far are these people that we’re bringing in going?’  

Using her voice: Union said she is trying to figure out how to 'create a larger movement to address all this trauma and all this harm' that BIPOC face in the workplace in the wake of her harassment complaint against America's Got Talent

Using her voice: Union said she is trying to figure out how to ‘create a larger movement to address all this trauma and all this harm’ that BIPOC face in the workplace in the wake of her harassment complaint against America’s Got Talent