Princess Beatrice DENIES breaking Covid rules

Princess Beatrice has insisted she’s done nothing wrong, after being accused of flouting Covid rules by attending an indoor dinner with people from different households. 

The royal, 32, was seen with her property developer husband Edoardo Mozzi, 37, and four other people in luxury Mayfair restaurant Isabel last Wednesday night, but now a spokesperson has claimed it was a ‘business development dinner’ and all parties left ‘in good time before the government curfew’.

Under the capital’s strict Tier 2 lockdown rules, only members of the same household can gather indoors – including in restaurants, but there is an exception for business meetings to take place for workers who don’t have office space. 

According to The Mirror, a spokesperson for Beatrice and her husband Edoardo Mozzi said: ‘This was a midweek Wednesday evening, work related, business development dinner. It was held in compliance with all government guidelines, the dinner was held in the early evening and all parties left in good time before the government curfew.

‘Strict masks were worn in line with the government advice.’  

Princess Beatrice breached social distancing rules by posing with her Norwegian friend Peter Dundas (left) in Mayfair

Her property developer husband Edoardo Mozzi, 37, (pictured, with the Princess in Mayfair earlier this month) also attended the dinner with Beatrice and four other friends

The royal’s property developer husband Edoardo Mozzi, 37, (right, with the Princess in Mayfair earlier this month) attended the dinner with Beatrice and four other friends

At one point in the evening, Beatrice – the ninth in line to the throne – took a picture with her fashion-designer friend Peter Dundas in which the mask-wearing pair breached social distancing rules.

He shared the picture online saying it was good to ‘catch up’ with the Princess.

And several social media users were quick to wish the fashion designer Happy Birthday in the comments section.

It comes after other diners claimed the event looked ‘very social’ and alcohol was seen on the Princess’s table.  

The three-hour dinner at Isabel (pictured) has been brushed off as an 'introductory work meeting' by royal sources - which would make it permissible under current rules

The three-hour dinner at Isabel (pictured) has been brushed off as an ‘introductory work meeting’ by royal sources – which would make it permissible under current rules

Several social media users were quick to wish the fashion designer happy birthday in the comments section (pictured)

Several social media users were quick to wish the fashion designer happy birthday in the comments section (pictured)

What are the rules on socialising indoors? 

Under Tier 2 rules, which were in place during Beatrice’s outing last week, it is illegal to socialise inside restaurants with people from outside your household.

Tier 2 permits pubs to stay open only if they serve food and households can only mix outside with a substantial meal. But diners in England cannot linger or order more booze after their food is finished – and will be expected to go even when they have more left to drink. 

Landlords will be expected to ask their customers to leave – or face hefty fines for breaching the Government’s strict coronavirus legislation.

People are technically banned from meeting inside pubs and restaurants in ‘high risk’ and ‘very high risk’ lockdown areas such as London and Greater Manchester. 

But Downing Street and local authorities have suggested that meetings inside hospitality venues are allowed as long as they are for ‘work purposes’. 

Up to 30 people from different households may meet indoors for work, as long as the place they are meeting is Covid-secure, according to Government guidance.

A No10 spokesman confirmed in October that while current rules advise people to limit their social contact and work from home ‘where possible’, people are permitted to meet indoors for work purposes ‘in high or very high areas’. In tier three areas, pubs are closed other than those which serve ‘substantial meals’.  

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