Trump tweets ‘people are not happy’ with athletes kneeling

President Donald Trump took aim at protesting athletes again on Tuesday, tweeting that people ‘are not happy that players are not standing for our National Anthem!’

Although some NFL players have done so since 2016, athletes across the NBA, NHL and Major League Baseball have recently begun kneeling in protest of racism during The Star-Spangled Banner. However, despite Trump’s claim, the leagues’ television audiences do not appear to have suffered.   

For instance, NBA viewership is up 14 percent on ESPN and TNT since the league restarted its pandemic-interrupted season at Disney World last week. 

TNT’s opening doubled header averaged an impressive 2.9 million viewers on Thursday, while that night’s Lakers-Clippers game specifically averaged 3.4 million, more than doubling the network’s regular season mark.  

Likewise, Friday’s Rockets-Mavericks game drew 1.7 million viewers, and Sunday’s Rockets-Bucks game also did well, attracting 2.2 million and giving ABC a demographic victory among adults 18 to 49. 

President Donald Trump took aim at protesting athletes again on Tuesday, tweeting that people ‘are not happy that players are not standing for our National Anthem!’

Members of the Sacramento Kings and Orlando Magic kneel in protest before a recent game

Members of the Sacramento Kings and Orlando Magic kneel in protest before a recent game 

San Francisco Giants manager Gabe Kapler kneels during the playing of the National Anthem prior to their game against the Texas Rangers at Oracle Park on Saturday

San Francisco Giants manager Gabe Kapler kneels during the playing of the National Anthem prior to their game against the Texas Rangers at Oracle Park on Saturday

Minnesota Wild's Matt Dumba takes a knee during the national anthem flanked by Edmonton Oilers' Darnell Nurse, right, and Chicago Blackhawks' Malcolm Subban before an NHL hockey Stanley Cup playoff game in Edmonton on Saturday

Minnesota Wild’s Matt Dumba takes a knee during the national anthem flanked by Edmonton Oilers’ Darnell Nurse, right, and Chicago Blackhawks’ Malcolm Subban before an NHL hockey Stanley Cup playoff game in Edmonton on Saturday 

MLB’s ratings are off to a strong start as well. 

The opening weekend drew 25 million unique viewers, tripling the audience size from 2019, according to MLB; while ESPN’s first 12 games of 2020 averaged nearly 1.2 million viewers – a 34 percent jump from last year. 

In fact, ESPN’s season Yankees-Nationals opener drew four million viewers, a record average audience for MLB’s opening night game, according to SportsProMedia.com.

Meanwhile Fox has seen a double-digit rise, according to The Wall Street Journal, and TBS’ first game of 2020 was also major success, roping in 653,000 viewers — a 65 percent improvement over 2019.

The league’s digital subscription service, MLB.TV, has also seen a surge in viewership, recording three of its five most-watched days ever with 924,000 unique users.

Ryan Reaves #75 and Robin Lehner #90 of the Vegas Golden Knights kneel during the singing of the American national anthem alongside Jason Dickinson #18 and Tyler Seguin #91 of the Dallas Stars before the start of the Round Robin game

Ryan Reaves #75 and Robin Lehner #90 of the Vegas Golden Knights kneel during the singing of the American national anthem alongside Jason Dickinson #18 and Tyler Seguin #91 of the Dallas Stars before the start of the Round Robin game

The NHL’s ratings, while not as high as its competitors’, have also been strong since the league re-opened inside bubbles in Toronto and Edmonton on Saturday.

NBC enjoyed its most-watched double-header in four years, thanks largely to the Montreal Canadiens’ 3-2 overtime win over the Pittsburgh Penguins on Monday that drew 1.5 million North American viewers.

Minnesota Wild defenseman Matt Dumba became the league’s first player to kneel in protest during the anthem on Saturday, and he has since been followed by a handful of other players.  

Compared to the NFL, players in the NHL, NBA, and MLB are relatively new to protesting.  

All three of those leagues were suspended amid the coronavirus outbreak when African-American man George Floyd was killed in Minneapolis police custody on May 25, sparking nationwide protests. Now, since returning to play, each league has acknowledged the social justice movement, while many individual players have knelt in protest.

Orlando Magic's Jonathan Isaac (1) stands as others kneel before the start of an NBA basketball game against the Brooklyn Nets

Orlando Magic’s Jonathan Isaac (1) stands as others kneel before the start of an NBA basketball game against the Brooklyn Nets

Nearly every NBA player has taken a knee during the anthem as commissioner Adam Silver vowed not to enforce the league’s 39-year-old rule requiring players to stand.

One notable exception has been Orlando Magic forward Jonathan Isaac, whose decision appeared to resonate with critics of the protests.

Isaac's replica jersey had never been among the top sellers at the league's online store, but according to the NBA, it ranked second behind only LeBron James' Lakers uniform between July 30, when the season restarted, and August 3

Isaac’s replica jersey had never been among the top sellers at the league’s online store, but according to the NBA, it ranked second behind only LeBron James’ Lakers uniform between July 30, when the season restarted, and August 3

Isaac’s replica jersey had never been among the top sellers at the league’s online store, but according to the NBA, it ranked second behind only LeBron James’ Lakers uniform between July 30, when the season restarted, and August 3.

Isaac, who also refused to wear a Black Lives Matter t-shirt with his teammates before the game, explained his decision to reporters afterwards.

‘Absolutely I believe Black Lives Matter,’ he said. ‘A lot went into my decision … kneeling or wearing a Black Lives Matter T-shirt don’t go hand in hand in supporting Black lives. I do believe that Black lives matter, I just felt like it was a decision I had to make, and I didn’t feel like putting that shirt on and kneeling went hand in hand with supporting Black lives.

‘I don’t think that kneeling or putting on a T-shirt for me, personally, is the answer. For me, Black lives are supported through the Gospel, all lives are supported through the Gospel.’

Unfortunately for Isaac, his season came to an abrupt end on Sunday when he tore the ACL in his left knee during a win over Sacramento. 

The the demonstrations have been a source of controversy since 2016, with then-San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick refusing to stand for the anthem to raise awareness about inequality and racist police brutality.

Since September of 2017, when Trump first seized upon the issue at a rally in Alabama, the President has repeatedly voiced his objection to athletes kneeling in protest. Over that time he has mentioned the word ‘anthem’ in no fewer than 30 tweets.

Although NFL ratings dropped 17 percent in 2017 and 2018 as players continued protesting during the anthem, the league had a 5 percent uptick last season while boasting 46 of the 50 most-watched telecasts during the year. 

The controversial protests began in 2016 with then-49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick (No. 7) refusing to stand for the anthem to raise awareness about inequality and police brutality

The controversial protests began in 2016 with then-49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick (No. 7) refusing to stand for the anthem to raise awareness about inequality and police brutality

Trump tweets ‘people are not happy’ with athletes kneeling

President Donald Trump took aim at protesting athletes again on Tuesday, tweeting that people ‘are not happy that players are not standing for our National Anthem!’

Although some NFL players have done so since 2016, athletes across the NBA, NHL and Major League Baseball have recently begun kneeling in protest of racism during The Star-Spangled Banner. However, despite Trump’s claim, the leagues’ television audiences do not appear to have suffered.   

For instance, NBA viewership is up 14 percent on ESPN and TNT since restarting its pandemic-interrupted season at Disney World last week, according to the league. 

TNT’s opening doubled header averaged an impressive 2.9 million viewers on Thursday, while that night’s Lakers-Clippers game specifically averaged 3.4 million, more than doubling the network’s regular season mark. 

Meanwhile Friday’s Rockets-Mavericks game drew 1.7 million viewers, and Sunday’s Rockets-Bucks game also did well, drawing 2.2 million and giving ABC a demographic victory among adults 18 to 49. 

President Donald Trump took aim at protesting athletes again on Tuesday, tweeting that people ‘are not happy that players are not standing for our National Anthem!’

Members of the Sacramento Kings and Orlando Magic kneel in protest before a recent game

Members of the Sacramento Kings and Orlando Magic kneel in protest before a recent game 

San Francisco Giants manager Gabe Kapler kneels during the playing of the National Anthem prior to their game against the Texas Rangers at Oracle Park on Saturday

San Francisco Giants manager Gabe Kapler kneels during the playing of the National Anthem prior to their game against the Texas Rangers at Oracle Park on Saturday

Minnesota Wild's Matt Dumba takes a knee during the national anthem flanked by Edmonton Oilers' Darnell Nurse, right, and Chicago Blackhawks' Malcolm Subban before an NHL hockey Stanley Cup playoff game in Edmonton on Saturday

Minnesota Wild’s Matt Dumba takes a knee during the national anthem flanked by Edmonton Oilers’ Darnell Nurse, right, and Chicago Blackhawks’ Malcolm Subban before an NHL hockey Stanley Cup playoff game in Edmonton on Saturday 

MLB’s ratings are off to a strong start as well. 

The opening weekend drew 25 million unique viewers, tripling the audience size from 2019, according to MLB; while ESPN’s first 12 games of 2020 averaged nearly 1.2 million viewers – a 34 percent jump from last year. 

In fact, ESPN’s season Yankees-Nationals opener drew four million viewers, a record average audience for MLB’s opening night game, according to SportsProMedia.com.

Meanwhile Fox has seen a double-digit rise, according to The Wall Street Journal, and TBS’ first game of 2020 was also major success, roping in 653,000 viewers — a 65 percent improvement over 2019.

The league’s digital subscription service, MLB.TV, has also seen a surge in viewership, recording three of its five most-watched days ever with 924,000 unique users.

Ryan Reaves #75 and Robin Lehner #90 of the Vegas Golden Knights kneel during the singing of the American national anthem alongside Jason Dickinson #18 and Tyler Seguin #91 of the Dallas Stars before the start of the Round Robin game

Ryan Reaves #75 and Robin Lehner #90 of the Vegas Golden Knights kneel during the singing of the American national anthem alongside Jason Dickinson #18 and Tyler Seguin #91 of the Dallas Stars before the start of the Round Robin game

The NHL’s ratings, while not as high as its competitors’, have also been strong since the league re-opened inside bubbles in Toronto and Edmonton on Saturday.

NBC enjoyed its most-watched double-header in four years, thanks largely to the Montreal Canadiens’ 3-2 overtime win over the Pittsburgh Penguins on Monday that drew 1.5 million North American viewers.

Minnesota Wild defenseman Matt Dumba became the league’s first player to kneel in protest during the anthem on Saturday, and he has since been followed by a handful of other players.  

Compared to the NFL, players in the NHL, NBA, and MLB are relatively new to protesting.  

All three of those leagues were suspended amid the coronavirus outbreak when African-American man George Floyd was killed in Minneapolis police custody on May 25, sparking nationwide protests. Now, since returning to play, each league has acknowledged the social justice movement, while many individual players have knelt in protest.

Orlando Magic's Jonathan Isaac (1) stands as others kneel before the start of an NBA basketball game against the Brooklyn Nets

Orlando Magic’s Jonathan Isaac (1) stands as others kneel before the start of an NBA basketball game against the Brooklyn Nets

Nearly every NBA player has taken a knee during the anthem as commissioner Adam Silver vowed not to enforce the league’s 39-year-old rule requiring players to stand.

One notable exception has been Orlando Magic forward Jonathan Isaac, whose decision appeared to resonate with critics of the protests.

Isaac's replica jersey had never been among the top sellers at the league's online store, but according to the NBA, it ranked second behind only LeBron James' Lakers uniform between July 30, when the season restarted, and August 3

Isaac’s replica jersey had never been among the top sellers at the league’s online store, but according to the NBA, it ranked second behind only LeBron James’ Lakers uniform between July 30, when the season restarted, and August 3

Isaac’s replica jersey had never been among the top sellers at the league’s online store, but according to the NBA, it ranked second behind only LeBron James’ Lakers uniform between July 30, when the season restarted, and August 3.

Isaac, who also refused to wear a Black Lives Matter t-shirt with his teammates before the game, explained his decision to reporters afterwards.

‘Absolutely I believe Black Lives Matter,’ he said. ‘A lot went into my decision … kneeling or wearing a Black Lives Matter T-shirt don’t go hand in hand in supporting Black lives. I do believe that Black lives matter, I just felt like it was a decision I had to make, and I didn’t feel like putting that shirt on and kneeling went hand in hand with supporting Black lives.

‘I don’t think that kneeling or putting on a T-shirt for me, personally, is the answer. For me, Black lives are supported through the Gospel, all lives are supported through the Gospel.’

Unfortunately for Isaac, his season came to an abrupt end on Sunday when he tore the ACL in his left knee during a win over Sacramento. 

The the demonstrations have been a source of controversy since 2016, with then-San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick refusing to stand for the anthem to raise awareness about inequality and racist police brutality.

Since September of 2017, when Trump first seized upon the issue at a rally in Alabama, the President has repeatedly voiced his objection to athletes kneeling in protest. Over that time he has mentioned the word ‘anthem’ in no fewer than 30 tweets.

Although NFL ratings dropped 17 percent in 2017 and 2018 as players continued protesting during the anthem, the league had a 5 percent uptick last season while boasting 46 of the 50 most-watched telecasts during the year. 

The controversial protests began in 2016 with then-49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick (No. 7) refusing to stand for the anthem to raise awareness about inequality and police brutality

The controversial protests began in 2016 with then-49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick (No. 7) refusing to stand for the anthem to raise awareness about inequality and police brutality

The black train guard who overturned ban on non-white BR staff

The family of a train guard who overturned a ban on non-white staff at British Railways in the 1960s has said his contribution to UK race relations should be taught in schools.

Asquith Xavier applied for a promotion that would see him move from Marylebone Station to Euston in 1966, a shift that would boost his salary by £10 a week.

But astonishingly at the time there was an informal ban at some stations on black workers holding railway jobs where they came into contact with the public and he was turned down.

Asquith Xavier with daughter Maria. Xavier’s family said his contribution to UK race relations should be taught in schools

Asquith refused to accept the discrimination and his quiet determination not only ended in him securing the job as Euston’s first non-white train guard – with his pay backdated to when he applied – it also led to the strengthening of the Race Relations Act and the creation of the Commission for Racial Equality.

It also sparked a full and independent inquiry into discrimination inside British Rail, which found that so-called colour bars were in place at several London stations.

Now on the 100th anniversary of his birth, Asquith’s granddaughter – named in his honour – is leading calls for his story and those of other notable British black people to be included in the National Curriculum and laments the fact no-one has ever heard of him.

Camealia Xavier-Chihota, 35, says his contribution also means Britain’s two million black people now live in a society where it is illegal for them to be penalised based on the colour of their skin.

She said: ‘I want people to stop being omitted from British culture and history just because of the colour of their skin.

‘I have a bit of a disdain for the term black history, because it’s just history!

‘If I’m honest I didn’t have any idea of the enormity of what my granddad did until about 2006 in my first graduate role.

‘When I did find out, I was brought to tears. I was filled with emotion because I realised exactly how important the work that he had put in place was.

‘His contribution to our society has undoubtedly shaped the way we live today and it should be celebrated and never forgotten.’

Asquith Xavier's granddaughter Camealia Xavier. She is leading calls for his story and those of other notable British black people to be included in the National Curriculum

Asquith Xavier’s granddaughter Camealia Xavier. She is leading calls for his story and those of other notable British black people to be included in the National Curriculum

Asquith Camile Xavier was born on July 18, 1920, on the island of Dominica in the West Indies, then a British colony.

Not much is known about his early life, but in 1958 he answered the British government’s call for those in the West Indies to move to Britain to work.

There were severe labour shortages as Britain rebuilt itself with Commonwealth citizens invited to come and help.

Modern immigration was born on June 22, 1948, with the arrival of the ship Empire Windrush at Tilbury Docks, carrying 492 Jamaicans.

It saw the country’s non-white population soar from a few thousand in 1945 to more than a million by 1970.

Camealia explained: ‘After World War II there was a campaign that went out in the Caribbean to recruit people to join their mother country because they needed people to help rebuild the economy.

‘But they were met with quite a frosty response and lots of racial discrimination when they got here.

‘Asquith came over first to secure employment and a home and then his wife Agnes followed with the children.

‘They had four children between them and my dad – the fifth – was 18 months old.’

The family settled in Paddington and had another two children and Asquith worked as a porter at Marylebone before progressing to a train guard.

But with five mouths to feed, he was keen for a transfer to Euston to be a train guard there, which would boost his weekly income from £40 to £50.

Although a quiet man, he was heartbroken when he was turned down with his colour cited as the reason.

Camealia, of Rochester, Kent, went on: ‘He started out in a menial role and worked his way up through the ranks.

‘I was told that at Marylebone, if ever there was an important person passing through on their way to other parts of the country, for instance royalty, that black people working in the station would be asked to take the day off so that person wouldn’t be met or see them.

‘The reason he wanted to work at Euston station was that the same role would get him an extra £10 a week – in today’s money this pay rise would have meant he’d earn the equivalent of just under £800 per week.

‘He had high aspirations and he’d come from a background in law enforcement in the Caribbean. He wanted to do his best in Britain, for Britain.

Camealia Xavier. Camealia has written to her local MP, the Secretary of State for Education and will also lobby Boris Johnson to ask him to make learning about black historical figures part of the curriculum

Camealia Xavier. Camealia has written to her local MP, the Secretary of State for Education and will also lobby Boris Johnson to ask him to make learning about black historical figures part of the curriculum

‘He was denied the promotion because of the colour of his skin and it was made quite clear by union officials that this racial discrimination was part of their unwritten policy.

‘That’s when the fight began.’

Asquith was determined not to drop the matter when he received his rejection letter from a staff committee at Euston, which said they could not employ him as he was black.

The first Race Relations Act was passed in 1965 making it illegal to discriminate on the grounds of colour, race, or ethnic or national origins in public places.

But the railways were not considered public and black people were only allowed to be cleaners or hold menial jobs at Euston.

A union official publicised Asquith’s rejection letter, writing a letter to the National Union of Railwaymen on his behalf and, on seeing it, two MPs wrote to Barbara Castle, then Secretary of State for Transport.

Following the outcry, British Railways confirmed it would abandon the colour ban.

At a press conference British Railways denied the 12-year colour bar at Euston had ever been real and said it was born by workers keen to protect their jobs.

On August 15th, 1966, Asquith got the job he so craved, although it came at a price.

He had to ask for police protection on his way to and from work and he was also subject to race hate and threatening letters from the public.

On the day he started at Euston, station manager Ernest Drinnan said: ‘We expect Mr Xavier to fit in very well here.

‘His record at Marylebone was exceptionally good and we know everyone here will take to him.’

BR spokesman Leslie Leppington said to him: ‘You will be fairly treated.There is now no colour bar at Euston. A coloured man can rise to any position here.’

With his extra wages, the family could now afford to buy their own house in Chatham, Kent, where they moved in 1972.

He travelled every day from Chatham mainline station to work in Euston, but not long after he secured his new position his health began to fail.

Two years later, in 1968, a new Race Relations Act made it illegal to refuse housing, employment or public services to people because of their ethnic background.

Presenting the Bill to Parliament, then Home Secretary Jim Callaghan said: ‘The House has rarely faced an issue of greater social significance for our country and our children.’

Camealia, who was herself born in Chatham to Asquith’s son Robertson, said: ‘When he managed to secure that role and disband the colour bar, he would have been proud of what he’d achieved, not only for himself, but for others.

‘But he underwent lots of racial discrimination not only from the public but also colleagues who saw him as a bit of a troublemaker.

‘They wanted an easy life and didn’t want him to rock the boat.

‘There is nothing more disappointing when people say ‘Go back to where you came from’ – he was a British man who was invited here to rebuild the economy, just like the rest of the Windrush Generation.

‘It was disappointing for him to not be regarded as equal.’

But Asquith was never the same again. He had an ulcer and suffered a stroke and died aged just 59 in 1980.

His widow Agnes died in 2004 aged 81 and both are buried in Chatham.

Camealia is desperately upset as she never got to meet her granddad – but her name is adopted from his middle name so she feels a special bond with him.

‘Not having met him myself I am slightly removed from what happened, but at the same time I’m also overwhelmed and hugely proud.

‘I feel a sense of duty to take the baton and advance the work he started

to eliminate racial inequality, disadvantage and discrimination.’

Camealia is also supporting the proposal for a blue plaque honouring her granddad at Chatham Station and is working on a charitable community initiative – Medway Culture Club – to support diversity and promote racial harmony in the Medway Towns.

She has also kept her maiden name Xavier to pass onto her children Ella, two, and Gabrielle, three, and is supported in her campaign by husband Shingirai Chihota.

Camealia has now written to her local MP, the Secretary of State for Education and will also lobby Boris Johnson to ask him to make learning about black historical figures part of the curriculum.

She added: ‘These people helped shape this country and teaching of their accomplishments may help address issues of prejudice and bias, assisting cohesion within the multicultural Britain we live in today. There are many great examples of positive black role models, yet they remain under-represented and I believe my grandad was a great example in modern-day history of how when dealing with matters of discrimination, the pen was mightier than the sword.

‘We need to bring the national curriculum up to speed to include the positive achievements of black and mixed race people and people of other ethnicities which are very relevant in both local and British history. It’s a way of counteracting unconscious bias in the next generation.

‘And I don’t think there should be one month dedicated to it. It should just be integrated into the curriculum.

‘What my granddad was able to justify over 50 years ago was not just that Black Lives Matter but that the quality of life of black people matters equally too.’

The black train guard who overturned ban on non-white BR staff

The family of a train guard who overturned a ban on non-white staff at British Railways in the 1960s has said his contribution to UK race relations should be taught in schools.

Asquith Xavier applied for a promotion that would see him move from Marylebone Station to Euston in 1966, a shift that would boost his salary by £10 a week.

But astonishingly at the time there was an informal ban at some stations on black workers holding railway jobs where they came into contact with the public and he was turned down.

Asquith Xavier with daughter Maria. Xavier’s family said his contribution to UK race relations should be taught in schools

Asquith refused to accept the discrimination and his quiet determination not only ended in him securing the job as Euston’s first non-white train guard – with his pay backdated to when he applied – it also led to the strengthening of the Race Relations Act and the creation of the Commission for Racial Equality.

It also sparked a full and independent inquiry into discrimination inside British Rail, which found that so-called colour bars were in place at several London stations.

Now on the 100th anniversary of his birth, Asquith’s granddaughter – named in his honour – is leading calls for his story and those of other notable British black people to be included in the National Curriculum and laments the fact no-one has ever heard of him.

Camealia Xavier-Chihota, 35, says his contribution also means Britain’s two million black people now live in a society where it is illegal for them to be penalised based on the colour of their skin.

She said: ‘I want people to stop being omitted from British culture and history just because of the colour of their skin.

‘I have a bit of a disdain for the term black history, because it’s just history!

‘If I’m honest I didn’t have any idea of the enormity of what my granddad did until about 2006 in my first graduate role.

‘When I did find out, I was brought to tears. I was filled with emotion because I realised exactly how important the work that he had put in place was.

‘His contribution to our society has undoubtedly shaped the way we live today and it should be celebrated and never forgotten.’

Asquith Xavier's granddaughter Camealia Xavier. She is leading calls for his story and those of other notable British black people to be included in the National Curriculum

Asquith Xavier’s granddaughter Camealia Xavier. She is leading calls for his story and those of other notable British black people to be included in the National Curriculum

Asquith Camile Xavier was born on July 18, 1920, on the island of Dominica in the West Indies, then a British colony.

Not much is known about his early life, but in 1958 he answered the British government’s call for those in the West Indies to move to Britain to work.

There were severe labour shortages as Britain rebuilt itself with Commonwealth citizens invited to come and help.

Modern immigration was born on June 22, 1948, with the arrival of the ship Empire Windrush at Tilbury Docks, carrying 492 Jamaicans.

It saw the country’s non-white population soar from a few thousand in 1945 to more than a million by 1970.

Camealia explained: ‘After World War II there was a campaign that went out in the Caribbean to recruit people to join their mother country because they needed people to help rebuild the economy.

‘But they were met with quite a frosty response and lots of racial discrimination when they got here.

‘Asquith came over first to secure employment and a home and then his wife Agnes followed with the children.

‘They had four children between them and my dad – the fifth – was 18 months old.’

The family settled in Paddington and had another two children and Asquith worked as a porter at Marylebone before progressing to a train guard.

But with five mouths to feed, he was keen for a transfer to Euston to be a train guard there, which would boost his weekly income from £40 to £50.

Although a quiet man, he was heartbroken when he was turned down with his colour cited as the reason.

Camealia, of Rochester, Kent, went on: ‘He started out in a menial role and worked his way up through the ranks.

‘I was told that at Marylebone, if ever there was an important person passing through on their way to other parts of the country, for instance royalty, that black people working in the station would be asked to take the day off so that person wouldn’t be met or see them.

‘The reason he wanted to work at Euston station was that the same role would get him an extra £10 a week – in today’s money this pay rise would have meant he’d earn the equivalent of just under £800 per week.

‘He had high aspirations and he’d come from a background in law enforcement in the Caribbean. He wanted to do his best in Britain, for Britain.

Camealia Xavier. Camealia has written to her local MP, the Secretary of State for Education and will also lobby Boris Johnson to ask him to make learning about black historical figures part of the curriculum

Camealia Xavier. Camealia has written to her local MP, the Secretary of State for Education and will also lobby Boris Johnson to ask him to make learning about black historical figures part of the curriculum

‘He was denied the promotion because of the colour of his skin and it was made quite clear by union officials that this racial discrimination was part of their unwritten policy.

‘That’s when the fight began.’

Asquith was determined not to drop the matter when he received his rejection letter from a staff committee at Euston, which said they could not employ him as he was black.

The first Race Relations Act was passed in 1965 making it illegal to discriminate on the grounds of colour, race, or ethnic or national origins in public places.

But the railways were not considered public and black people were only allowed to be cleaners or hold menial jobs at Euston.

A union official publicised Asquith’s rejection letter, writing a letter to the National Union of Railwaymen on his behalf and, on seeing it, two MPs wrote to Barbara Castle, then Secretary of State for Transport.

Following the outcry, British Railways confirmed it would abandon the colour ban.

At a press conference British Railways denied the 12-year colour bar at Euston had ever been real and said it was born by workers keen to protect their jobs.

On August 15th, 1966, Asquith got the job he so craved, although it came at a price.

He had to ask for police protection on his way to and from work and he was also subject to race hate and threatening letters from the public.

On the day he started at Euston, station manager Ernest Drinnan said: ‘We expect Mr Xavier to fit in very well here.

‘His record at Marylebone was exceptionally good and we know everyone here will take to him.’

BR spokesman Leslie Leppington said to him: ‘You will be fairly treated.There is now no colour bar at Euston. A coloured man can rise to any position here.’

With his extra wages, the family could now afford to buy their own house in Chatham, Kent, where they moved in 1972.

He travelled every day from Chatham mainline station to work in Euston, but not long after he secured his new position his health began to fail.

Two years later, in 1968, a new Race Relations Act made it illegal to refuse housing, employment or public services to people because of their ethnic background.

Presenting the Bill to Parliament, then Home Secretary Jim Callaghan said: ‘The House has rarely faced an issue of greater social significance for our country and our children.’

Camealia, who was herself born in Chatham to Asquith’s son Robertson, said: ‘When he managed to secure that role and disband the colour bar, he would have been proud of what he’d achieved, not only for himself, but for others.

‘But he underwent lots of racial discrimination not only from the public but also colleagues who saw him as a bit of a troublemaker.

‘They wanted an easy life and didn’t want him to rock the boat.

‘There is nothing more disappointing when people say ‘Go back to where you came from’ – he was a British man who was invited here to rebuild the economy, just like the rest of the Windrush Generation.

‘It was disappointing for him to not be regarded as equal.’

But Asquith was never the same again. He had an ulcer and suffered a stroke and died aged just 59 in 1980.

His widow Agnes died in 2004 aged 81 and both are buried in Chatham.

Camealia is desperately upset as she never got to meet her granddad – but her name is adopted from his middle name so she feels a special bond with him.

‘Not having met him myself I am slightly removed from what happened, but at the same time I’m also overwhelmed and hugely proud.

‘I feel a sense of duty to take the baton and advance the work he started

to eliminate racial inequality, disadvantage and discrimination.’

Camealia is also supporting the proposal for a blue plaque honouring her granddad at Chatham Station and is working on a charitable community initiative – Medway Culture Club – to support diversity and promote racial harmony in the Medway Towns.

She has also kept her maiden name Xavier to pass onto her children Ella, two, and Gabrielle, three, and is supported in her campaign by husband Shingirai Chihota.

Camealia has now written to her local MP, the Secretary of State for Education and will also lobby Boris Johnson to ask him to make learning about black historical figures part of the curriculum.

She added: ‘These people helped shape this country and teaching of their accomplishments may help address issues of prejudice and bias, assisting cohesion within the multicultural Britain we live in today. There are many great examples of positive black role models, yet they remain under-represented and I believe my grandad was a great example in modern-day history of how when dealing with matters of discrimination, the pen was mightier than the sword.

‘We need to bring the national curriculum up to speed to include the positive achievements of black and mixed race people and people of other ethnicities which are very relevant in both local and British history. It’s a way of counteracting unconscious bias in the next generation.

‘And I don’t think there should be one month dedicated to it. It should just be integrated into the curriculum.

‘What my granddad was able to justify over 50 years ago was not just that Black Lives Matter but that the quality of life of black people matters equally too.’

Ryan Reynolds regrets having 2012 wedding at a plantation

Ryan Reynolds has expressed regret at having married Blake Lively on a plantation back in 2012, during an interview with Fast Company.

The 43-year-old Deadpool actor and the 32-year-old Gossip Girl alum tied the knot at Boone Hall, a former plantation in South Carolina, and were subsequently criticized for glamorizing a place where black slaves once suffered and died.

And the Canadian star was unequivocal in his apology when talking to the magazine for their September issue, calling the choice of location ‘something we’ll always be deeply and unreservedly sorry for’.  

‘A giant f***ing mistake’: Ryan Reynolds has expressed regret over the venue of his 2012 wedding to Blake Lively during an interview with Fast Company. The couple seen here in 2011

The star of The Hitman’s Bodyguard then called the decision ‘impossible to reconcile.’

‘What we saw at the time was a wedding venue on Pinterest. What we saw after was a place built upon devastating tragedy.’ 

‘Years ago we got married again at home – but shame works in weird ways. A giant f***ing mistake like that can either cause you to shut down or it can reframe things and move you into action,’ continued the action star. 

‘It doesn’t mean you won’t f*** up again. But repatterning and challenging lifelong social conditioning is a job that doesn’t end.’

Boone Hall Plantation also famously appeared in Rachel McAdams and Ryan Gosling’s romantic 2004 movie, The Notebook. 

History: The 43-year-old Deadpool actor and the 32-year-old Gossip Girl alum tied the knot at Boone Hall, a former plantation in South Carolina, and were subsequently criticized for glamorizing a place where black slaves once suffered and died

History: The 43-year-old Deadpool actor and the 32-year-old Gossip Girl alum tied the knot at Boone Hall, a former plantation in South Carolina, and were subsequently criticized for glamorizing a place where black slaves once suffered and died

Amends: In May, the couple donated $200,000 to the NAACP, as well as releasing a statement which read in part, 'We're ashamed that in the past we've allowed ourselves to be uninformed about how deeply rooted systemic racism is'

Amends: In May, the couple donated $200,000 to the NAACP, as well as releasing a statement which read in part, ‘We’re ashamed that in the past we’ve allowed ourselves to be uninformed about how deeply rooted systemic racism is’

In May, the couple donated $200,000 to the NAACP, as well as releasing a statement which read in part, ‘We’re ashamed that in the past we’ve allowed ourselves to be uninformed about how deeply rooted systemic racism is.’ 

Back in 2012, the Green Lantern stars held their nuptials in an intimate ceremony in Charleston, South Carolina – to which just 35 guests were invited. 

Blake’s self-confessed ‘idol’ Martha Stewart helped to create the big day, alongside local wedding planner Tara Guérard.

Florence Welch performed during the ceremony, and Bette Midler was one of a number of high profile guests who attended, as well as Blake’s The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants co-stars America Ferrera, Amber Tamblyn, and Alexis Bledel.

Ryan and Blake have gone on to have three daughters: James, five, Inez, three, and a third daughter, born last year in October, whom the pair have so far declined to name publicly. 

The stars were first photographed as a couple in October 2011, not long after the premiere of their film, Green Lantern. 

Unreserved: The Canadian star was unequivocal in his apology when talking to the magazine for their September issue, calling the choice of location 'something we¿ll always be deeply and unreservedly sorry for'

Unreserved: The Canadian star was unequivocal in his apology when talking to the magazine for their September issue, calling the choice of location ‘something we’ll always be deeply and unreservedly sorry for’

Long time loves: The stars were first photographed as a couple in October 2011, not long after the premiere of their film, Green Lantern. Seen here in May 2019

Long time loves: The stars were first photographed as a couple in October 2011, not long after the premiere of their film, Green Lantern. Seen here in May 2019

His girls: Ryan and Blake have gone on to have three daughters: James, five, Inez, three, and a third daughter, born last year in October, whom the pair have so far declined to name publicly. Ryan, Blake, James and Inez seen here in 2016

His girls: Ryan and Blake have gone on to have three daughters: James, five, Inez, three, and a third daughter, born last year in October, whom the pair have so far declined to name publicly. Ryan, Blake, James and Inez seen here in 2016

And Ryan poked fun at the much maligned superhero film on Tuesday, tweeting out a comically abbreviated ‘cut’ of the movie.

Reynolds had condensed the DC comics film, which garnered a mere 26% critical rating on Rotten Tomatoes, down to just 27 seconds.

He captioned the tweet, ‘Here’s the secret Reynolds Cut of GL you all haven’t been waiting for. In order to make it as great as possible we made some difficult and judicious cuts.’ 

Green Lantern: Ryan poked fun at the much maligned superhero film on Tuesday, tweeting out a comically abbreviated 'cut' of the movie

Green Lantern: Ryan poked fun at the much maligned superhero film on Tuesday, tweeting out a comically abbreviated ‘cut’ of the movie

Short but sweet: Reynolds had condensed the DC comics film, which garnered a mere 26% critical rating on Rotten Tomatoes, down to just 27 seconds

The hilarious re-edit began with Reynolds having his brains blown out all over the film's script by his alter-ego, Deadpool, in a scene cribbed from Deadpool 2

Short but sweet: Reynolds had condensed the DC comics film, which garnered a mere 26% critical rating on Rotten Tomatoes, down to just 27 seconds

The hilarious re-edit began with Reynolds having his brains blown out all over the film’s script by his alter-ego, Deadpool, in a scene cribbed from Deadpool 2.

It then showed the movie in brief, at one point digitally substituting Ryan for Tom Cruise, who did not appear in the movie  but was at one point rumored to take on the role of Hal Jordan.

The ‘Reynolds Cut’ then showed a snippet of the 2017 Justice League movie, which while technically part of the same comic book universe, never featured Reynold’s infamous character.

The A Team: The 'Reynolds Cut' then showed a snippet of the 2017 Justice League movie, which while technically part of the same comic book universe, never featured Reynold's infamous character

The A Team: The ‘Reynolds Cut’ then showed a snippet of the 2017 Justice League movie, which while technically part of the same comic book universe, never featured Reynold’s infamous character

These intimidating protests will only inflame divisions across Britain, by INAYA FOLARIN IMAN 

There have been numerous demonstrations across Britain since the dramatic rise of the Black Lives Matter movement in response to the killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis in May.

But the one that took place in Brixton over the weekend, to mark the 186th anniversary of the Abolition of Slavery, was different. 

It marked the debut appearance of Forever Family, a black rights protest group, on London’s streets.

Their intent was undoubtedly peaceful, but many felt their appearance — makeshift black uniforms and stab vests bearing the logo FF Force, while some had face masks and one a balaclava — was reminiscent of a paramilitary organisation.

The imagery was sinister, hostile even, as young men and women stood with raised fists in a move synonymous with the black rights movement.

Forever Family says its aim is to achieve unity ‘in the battle against racism, inequality and injustice’ — and who would argue with that. Yet, to me, the atmosphere was one of intimidation that is out of place in our democratic society

Their presence would not have been out of place in a dystopian land of revolutionary chaos and conflict, rather than the well-ordered streets of our capital.

Forever Family says its aim is to achieve unity ‘in the battle against racism, inequality and injustice’ — and who would argue with that.

Yet, to me, the atmosphere was one of intimidation that is out of place in our democratic society.

Indeed, there have been no scenes like this on British soil since the outlawed IRA was operating in Northern Ireland at the peak of the Troubles, when its masked parades contributed to its culture of terror.

Destructive

But while the Brixton march was alarming, it is the inevitable consequence of the campaign by Black Lives Matter to promote an inflammatory brand of identity politics.

Imported from America, this toxic ideology sees everything through the prism of race, based on a narrative where black people are the permanent victims of oppression, while white people are collectively guilty of perpetuating discrimination.

Under this dogma, black people are encouraged to believe that Britain is so racist that their only hope is to organise their own resistance through groups like Forever Family.

As a woman of African origin myself, I believe this is a highly destructive outlook.

By fuelling discord, it undoes all the good work done over recent decades in building better race relations in Britain. 

Under this dogma, black people are encouraged to believe that Britain is so racist that their only hope is to organise their own resistance through groups like Forever Family

Under this dogma, black people are encouraged to believe that Britain is so racist that their only hope is to organise their own resistance through groups like Forever Family

It is a recipe for strife, rather than solidarity, putting the emphasis on what divides us instead of what unites us. 

More importantly, it is also the very antithesis of racial progress, which, in the famous words of Dr Martin Luther King, holds that people should be judged ‘by the content of their character’, not ‘by the colour of their skin’.

And so, for the sake of our future harmony, I believe that their alienating doctrine must not be allowed to prevail.

That is why I have established a new movement — The Equiano Project — in order to present an alternative vision; one that embodies the positive values of freedom, openness and dialogue rather than the relentlessly negative soundtrack of bullying, grievance and antagonism.

The Project is named after Olaudah Equiano, an 18th-century African writer who was sold into slavery but, partly through his enterprise and wide range of talents, was eventually able to buy his freedom from his British masters. 

Equiano went on to become a key figure in the campaign for the abolition of slavery, as well as a successful author.

Simplistic

In contrast to the politically fashionable concentration on the dark side of black history, Equiano’s uplifting life and impressive achievements should be a source of inspiration to current generations.

The Project holds its first meeting tonight — an online debate about the need for a different, less simplistic approach to race to the one put forward by Black Lives Matter.

Among the speakers are Trevor Phillips, the distinguished broadcaster, writer and former head of the Equalities and Human Rights Commission, and Katharine Birbalsingh, the pioneering education reformer whose own superb leadership of a high-performing inner-city school refutes the politically correct notion that black pupils are doomed to fail because of institutional white racism.

It is telling that since the launch of the Project was announced, I have come under attack from opposite ends of the political spectrum.

Some far-Left authoritarians loathe any challenge to their binary conceit of black victimhood and white racism. 

Then there are the Neo-Nazis, who with equal ferocity want to protect their warped concept of white identity in Britain.

It is ironic how much the two ideological camps — with their closed minds and racial obsessions — have in common.

But that is precisely why I want to see change. 

The reality is that the hysteria fostered by Black Lives Matter has not only shattered the bonds of mutual trust in Britain, it has created a climate of fear, where traditional British liberties are now under unprecedented threat.

Tolerance — that most important of Enlightenment values — is disappearing. In its place, a mood of witch-hunting McCarthyism has taken hold in civic life, where people feel they cannot speak out against the current orthodoxy.

And so as history is rewritten, school curricula are ‘decolonised’, statues are pulled down and heretics sent off for ‘re-education’.

Such a poisonous attitude is the very opposite of what our country needs. We should be overcoming differences, not entrenching them. 

To do otherwise ignores what I believe: that Britain is anything but a hotbed of prejudice. 

Of course, this country has its problems, but Britain has probably done more to foster good race relations than any other place on Earth.

That record of integrating newcomers is exactly why so many newcomers, most of them from Asia, Africa and the Caribbean, want to settle here.

And, ultimately, the fabric and history of this nation actually ensured this process, establishing the very freedoms that are now under attack from the race obsessives.

After all, Britain is the land that pioneered the concept of equality before the law through Magna Carta, gave the world parliamentary democracy, developed a free Press and formulated the idea of policing by consent. We played a central role in the abolition of slavery and, unlike the U.S., never had any system of racial segregation — yet another reason why Black Lives Matter is so wrong-headed to argue that the black experience here is anything like that in America.

Such an exaggeration of disadvantage does young blacks no favours. If anything, it narrows their horizons, traps them in victimhood and treats them as second-class citizens.

My Nigerian mother used to tell me: ‘You can achieve whatever you want.’ Those words are far more likely to inspire a young black adult than a pithy placard railing against invented oppression.

Nor does the Black Lives Matter ideology provide any practical solutions to the real problems that exist in modern Britain.

All its howls about supposed ‘racial injustice’, ‘police brutality’ and ‘white supremacy’ will do nothing to lessen knife crime, promote stable family units or stop the formation of street gangs.

To the self-proclaimed ‘anti-racists’, it is easier to pass the blame than face up to social responsibility.

But the rest of us know that a different path must be forged.

  • www.theequianoproject.com

These intimidating protests will only inflame divisions across Britain, by INAYA FOLARIN IMAN 

There have been numerous demonstrations across Britain since the dramatic rise of the Black Lives Matter movement in response to the killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis in May.

But the one that took place in Brixton over the weekend, to mark the 186th anniversary of the Abolition of Slavery, was different. 

It marked the debut appearance of Forever Family, a black rights protest group, on London’s streets.

Their intent was undoubtedly peaceful, but many felt their appearance — makeshift black uniforms and stab vests bearing the logo FF Force, while some had face masks and one a balaclava — was reminiscent of a paramilitary organisation.

The imagery was sinister, hostile even, as young men and women stood with raised fists in a move synonymous with the black rights movement.

Forever Family says its aim is to achieve unity ‘in the battle against racism, inequality and injustice’ — and who would argue with that. Yet, to me, the atmosphere was one of intimidation that is out of place in our democratic society

Their presence would not have been out of place in a dystopian land of revolutionary chaos and conflict, rather than the well-ordered streets of our capital.

Forever Family says its aim is to achieve unity ‘in the battle against racism, inequality and injustice’ — and who would argue with that.

Yet, to me, the atmosphere was one of intimidation that is out of place in our democratic society.

Indeed, there have been no scenes like this on British soil since the outlawed IRA was operating in Northern Ireland at the peak of the Troubles, when its masked parades contributed to its culture of terror.

Destructive

But while the Brixton march was alarming, it is the inevitable consequence of the campaign by Black Lives Matter to promote an inflammatory brand of identity politics.

Imported from America, this toxic ideology sees everything through the prism of race, based on a narrative where black people are the permanent victims of oppression, while white people are collectively guilty of perpetuating discrimination.

Under this dogma, black people are encouraged to believe that Britain is so racist that their only hope is to organise their own resistance through groups like Forever Family.

As a woman of African origin myself, I believe this is a highly destructive outlook.

By fuelling discord, it undoes all the good work done over recent decades in building better race relations in Britain. 

Under this dogma, black people are encouraged to believe that Britain is so racist that their only hope is to organise their own resistance through groups like Forever Family

Under this dogma, black people are encouraged to believe that Britain is so racist that their only hope is to organise their own resistance through groups like Forever Family

It is a recipe for strife, rather than solidarity, putting the emphasis on what divides us instead of what unites us. 

More importantly, it is also the very antithesis of racial progress, which, in the famous words of Dr Martin Luther King, holds that people should be judged ‘by the content of their character’, not ‘by the colour of their skin’.

And so, for the sake of our future harmony, I believe that their alienating doctrine must not be allowed to prevail.

That is why I have established a new movement — The Equiano Project — in order to present an alternative vision; one that embodies the positive values of freedom, openness and dialogue rather than the relentlessly negative soundtrack of bullying, grievance and antagonism.

The Project is named after Olaudah Equiano, an 18th-century African writer who was sold into slavery but, partly through his enterprise and wide range of talents, was eventually able to buy his freedom from his British masters. 

Equiano went on to become a key figure in the campaign for the abolition of slavery, as well as a successful author.

Simplistic

In contrast to the politically fashionable concentration on the dark side of black history, Equiano’s uplifting life and impressive achievements should be a source of inspiration to current generations.

The Project holds its first meeting tonight — an online debate about the need for a different, less simplistic approach to race to the one put forward by Black Lives Matter.

Among the speakers are Trevor Phillips, the distinguished broadcaster, writer and former head of the Equalities and Human Rights Commission, and Katharine Birbalsingh, the pioneering education reformer whose own superb leadership of a high-performing inner-city school refutes the politically correct notion that black pupils are doomed to fail because of institutional white racism.

It is telling that since the launch of the Project was announced, I have come under attack from opposite ends of the political spectrum.

Some far-Left authoritarians loathe any challenge to their binary conceit of black victimhood and white racism. 

Then there are the Neo-Nazis, who with equal ferocity want to protect their warped concept of white identity in Britain.

It is ironic how much the two ideological camps — with their closed minds and racial obsessions — have in common.

But that is precisely why I want to see change. 

The reality is that the hysteria fostered by Black Lives Matter has not only shattered the bonds of mutual trust in Britain, it has created a climate of fear, where traditional British liberties are now under unprecedented threat.

Tolerance — that most important of Enlightenment values — is disappearing. In its place, a mood of witch-hunting McCarthyism has taken hold in civic life, where people feel they cannot speak out against the current orthodoxy.

And so as history is rewritten, school curricula are ‘decolonised’, statues are pulled down and heretics sent off for ‘re-education’.

Such a poisonous attitude is the very opposite of what our country needs. We should be overcoming differences, not entrenching them. 

To do otherwise ignores what I believe: that Britain is anything but a hotbed of prejudice. 

Of course, this country has its problems, but Britain has probably done more to foster good race relations than any other place on Earth.

That record of integrating newcomers is exactly why so many newcomers, most of them from Asia, Africa and the Caribbean, want to settle here.

And, ultimately, the fabric and history of this nation actually ensured this process, establishing the very freedoms that are now under attack from the race obsessives.

After all, Britain is the land that pioneered the concept of equality before the law through Magna Carta, gave the world parliamentary democracy, developed a free Press and formulated the idea of policing by consent. We played a central role in the abolition of slavery and, unlike the U.S., never had any system of racial segregation — yet another reason why Black Lives Matter is so wrong-headed to argue that the black experience here is anything like that in America.

Such an exaggeration of disadvantage does young blacks no favours. If anything, it narrows their horizons, traps them in victimhood and treats them as second-class citizens.

My Nigerian mother used to tell me: ‘You can achieve whatever you want.’ Those words are far more likely to inspire a young black adult than a pithy placard railing against invented oppression.

Nor does the Black Lives Matter ideology provide any practical solutions to the real problems that exist in modern Britain.

All its howls about supposed ‘racial injustice’, ‘police brutality’ and ‘white supremacy’ will do nothing to lessen knife crime, promote stable family units or stop the formation of street gangs.

To the self-proclaimed ‘anti-racists’, it is easier to pass the blame than face up to social responsibility.

But the rest of us know that a different path must be forged.

  • www.theequianoproject.com

Ex-EastEnders star Katie Jarvis ‘arrested for drunken pub fight and being racially abusive’

It has been claimed that former EastEnders actress Katie Jarvis is the woman featured in a video of a pub brawl in Essex – leading to an arrest for ‘racially aggravated public order’.

According to The Sun, the mother-of-two, 29, is the brunette involved in the fight which took place on Friday evening on the seafront.

The video was shot by a bystander on their phone and sees five black women scuffling with a white woman, after she reportedly called one of them a ‘f***ing black c***,’ and yelling, ‘f*** Black Lives Matter!’

Drama-on-sea! It has been claimed that former EastEnders actress Katie Jarvis is the woman featured in a video of a pub brawl in Essex – leading to an arrest for ‘racially aggravated public order’

The clip sees the group of women brawling in the outside drinking area of the Papillon pub in Southend-on-Sea, before it spills out onto the street.

The video was posted to Facebook and has been viewed over 20,000 times, picked up first by local paper The Chelmsford & Mid-Essex Times.

The publication published Essex police’s statement about the incident, which said: ‘A 29-year old woman was arrested on Friday 31 July just after 10.05pm following reports of a disturbance in Marine Parade, Southend.

‘She has been arrested on suspicion of assault and racially aggravated public order. She has been released on bail until Friday 21 August.’

Reports: According to The Sun, the mother-of-two, 29, is the brunette involved in the fight which took place on Friday evening on the seafront [pictured 2009]

Reports: According to The Sun, the mother-of-two, 29, is the brunette involved in the fight which took place on Friday evening on the seafront [pictured 2009]

Violent! The video was shot by a bystander on their phone and sees five black women scuffling with a white woman, after she reportedly called one of them a 'f***ing black c***,' and yelling, 'f*** Black Lives Matter!'

Violent! The video was shot by a bystander on their phone and sees five black women scuffling with a white woman, after she reportedly called one of them a ‘f***ing black c***,’ and yelling, ‘f*** Black Lives Matter!’

MailOnline has contacted Katie’s rep for comment. 

The clip sees the women screaming at one another as they all stumble into the street, towards the road.

The pub’s sign is pushed over and punters are seen dodging out the way as the group of women repeatedly strike the woman believed to be Katie.

The sounds of glasses smashing can be heard as another woman attempts to break the fight up, with a man then getting involved.

Scuffle! The clip sees the group of women brawling in the outside drinking area of the Papillon pub in Southend-on-Sea, before it spills out onto the street

Scuffle! The clip sees the group of women brawling in the outside drinking area of the Papillon pub in Southend-on-Sea, before it spills out onto the street

ID'd? Katie was identified by a witness who says they heard the woman yell 'I'm a famous actress!' as her friends chimed in with, 'She¿s Hayley Slater from EastEnders!' [pictured in the soap in 2018]

ID’d? Katie was identified by a witness who says they heard the woman yell ‘I’m a famous actress!’ as her friends chimed in with, ‘She’s Hayley Slater from EastEnders!’ [pictured in the soap in 2018]

At this point, the police pull up in a van to intervene.

Katie was identified by a witness who says they heard the woman yell ‘I’m a famous actress!’ as her friends chimed in with: ‘She’s Hayley Slater from EastEnders!’ 

It’s understood that the tiff began when Katie took a chair from the group of women’s table  

A witness  claimed: ‘I couldn’t believe it. Police arrested her and Katie was saying “I haven’t done anything wrong!”‘

Actress Katie has two children – Lillie Mae, 11, and Alfie, eight. 

She was involved in a bar brawl in March 2019, when she was ‘glassed by a drunken Irish man’ on a night out in London.

Brawl! She was involved in a bar brawl in March 2019, when she was 'glassed by a drunken Irish man' on a night out in London

Brawl! She was involved in a bar brawl in March 2019, when she was ‘glassed by a drunken Irish man’ on a night out in London

Follow up: After this, she sent a message to fans to reassure them that she was ok after the incident

Follow up: After this, she sent a message to fans to reassure them that she was ok after the incident

She was treated by medical staff after the attack, said to have been out in Romford when she was attacked.

At the time, she tweeted her thanks to the police service for ‘looking after’ her.

She said: ‘Big thank you to the Met police tonight and ambulance service for looking after me after I was glassed by a drunken Irish man for f*** all.’

However, she later deleted the tweet after fans spotted it and inquired after her well-being.

She later posted: ‘Thanks lovely lot I’m good as gold.’

Family affair: Katie joined the Eastenders cast in 2018 as the cousin of Kat Slater [Jessie Wallace]. One of her storylines saw her have an affair with Kat's husband Alfie Moon [Shane Richie] while they lived in Spain with Kat and their children

Family affair: Katie joined the Eastenders cast in 2018 as the cousin of Kat Slater [Jessie Wallace]. One of her storylines saw her have an affair with Kat’s husband Alfie Moon [Shane Richie] while they lived in Spain with Kat and their children

She then thanked fans and sent out a tweet to ‘put minds at rest’, posting: ‘Ok to put people’s minds, and questions to rest. I am absolutely fine thank you so much for all your concern and checking in on me but i’m a soldier and been through a hell of alot worse.

‘Now you can start focusing your concerns on some real news. ‘Love you all xx’ 

According to The Mirror her agent refused to discuss the incident.

She said: ‘I have no comment to make to any newspaper on any subject to do with anything. Whatever it is I don’t want to hear.’

She made headlines last year when it was revealed she had become a security guard at bargain store B&M in Romford, East London, following her departure from EastEnders.

Career move: She made headlines last year when it was revealed she had become a security guard at bargain store B&M in Romford, East London, following her departure from EastEnders [pictured on the soap in 2018]

Career move: She made headlines last year when it was revealed she had become a security guard at bargain store B&M in Romford, East London, following her departure from EastEnders [pictured on the soap in 2018]

Speaking out: She then appeared on Victoria Derbyshire to admit she had felt 'hurt and embarrassed' for being 'made to feel ashamed for having a normal job'

Speaking out: She then appeared on Victoria Derbyshire to admit she had felt ‘hurt and embarrassed’ for being ‘made to feel ashamed for having a normal job’

She was pictured outside the store on a break last October, having a coffee and a cigarette, leading to much attention from soap fans.

She then appeared on Victoria Derbyshire, followed by an interview with Grazia magazine, to admit she had felt ‘hurt and embarrassed’ for being ‘made to feel ashamed for having a normal job’.

She added that she was proud to speak out on behalf of hard-working single mums because providing for her family is paramount to her.

Katie said: ‘It’s the nature of being an actor; gigs come and go, and after my contract with EastEnders ended in February, I found a new job as soon as I could. Doing work like this is also what keeps me grounded.’

Katie revealed she ‘crumbled’ and was left in tears after a friend alerted her to the front page news.

Honest: She added that she was proud to speak out on behalf of hard-working single mums because providing for her family is paramount to her

Honest: She added that she was proud to speak out on behalf of hard-working single mums because providing for her family is paramount to her

Katie said: 'It's the nature of being an actor; gigs come and go, and after my contract with EastEnders ended in February, I found a new job as soon as I could. Doing work like this is also what keeps me grounded' [pictured on the soap with Danny Dyer in 2018]

Katie said: ‘It’s the nature of being an actor; gigs come and go, and after my contract with EastEnders ended in February, I found a new job as soon as I could. Doing work like this is also what keeps me grounded’ [pictured on the soap with Danny Dyer in 2018]

But upon reflection and thanks to the support of fellow thespians from Tamzin Outwaite to Nathalie Emmanuel, she is ‘proud’ to have changed the conversation.

‘Their support gave me the strength to speak out and stand up for hard-working people – especially single mums’, she said, and insisted her priority in life is caring for her two children, saying: ‘As long as I’m providing for them, nothing else matters. Everything I do is for them.’

She said she is proud to take on any work she can to ‘keep busy and learn new things’.   

Katie pointed that ‘all actors go through it over the years, I’ve had so many jobs in between and not just being a security guard.’

‘At 17 when I got [first movie role] Fish Tank I was doing doughnuts with my uncle at the time at festivals and things like that so I’d go on there and do the food carts,’ she said. ‘I’ve been a waitress, I’ve worked at a credit card company, I’ve done admin, I’ve done all types of things.’

Working girl: She said she is proud to take on any work she can to 'keep busy and learn new things'

Working girl: She said she is proud to take on any work she can to ‘keep busy and learn new things’

New career: Katie's character was last seen on screen in February 2019 [pictured with co-star Gillian Wright]

New career: Katie’s character was last seen on screen in February 2019 [pictured with co-star Gillian Wright]

Promising: Katie, from Dagenham, found fame in Hollywood before winning a part in the BBC soap, starring in 2009 movie Fish Tank

Promising: Katie, from Dagenham, found fame in Hollywood before winning a part in the BBC soap, starring in 2009 movie Fish Tank

Katie added that when she first saw the photos of herself she felt ashamed but is now proud that she’s doing all she can to provide for her family. 

‘One of my sisters she calls me a dabbler because I seem to do a bit of everything and I like to be busy and I like to learn new things, it doesn’t matter what it is,’ she told Victoria Derbyshire.

She added: ‘The people I work with there are amazing, they get up every single day, they work hard for their money and it doesn’t matter what job you’re doing, I don’t feel like anyone should be made to feel like how I felt when I woke up do you know what I mean, because I think as long as you’re working that’s all that matters.’

Katie said being a security guard isn’t easy and that she actually works alongside her sister at the bargain store, explaining: ‘A lot goes into being a security guard, they put themselves at risk. I took that job on and joined my sister because she’s a security guard there.’ 

Katie joined the Eastenders cast in 2018 as the cousin of Kat Slater [Jessie Wallace].

Stars: Katie starred opposite Michael Fassbender in the cult hit

Stars: Katie starred opposite Michael Fassbender in the cult hit

Comeback? BBC bosses were said to be keeping the door open for her character to return

Comeback? BBC bosses were said to be keeping the door open for her character to return

One of her storylines saw her have an affair with Kat’s husband Alfie Moon [Shane Richie] while they lived in Spain with Kat and their children.

Hayley then fell pregnant, giving birth to daughter Cherry.

Dramatic scenes aired over the subsequent Christmas season, leading to a shocking showdown between Hayley, Alfie and Kat. In one scene, Hayley pushed Alfie down a flight of stairs.

Katie’s character was last seen on screen in February 2019 when Stacey Fowler, played by Lacey Turner, went to hospital to collect her after treatment for her mental health. 

The troubled young mum had discharged herself and taken off. But BBC bosses were said to be keeping the door open for her return.

Katie, from Dagenham, found fame in Hollywood before winning a part in the BBC soap, starring in 2009 movie Fish Tank. 

Ex-EastEnders star Katie Jarvis ‘arrested for drunken pub fight and being racially abusive’

It has been claimed that former EastEnders actress Katie Jarvis is the woman featured in a video of a pub brawl in Essex – leading to an arrest for ‘racially aggravated public order’.

According to The Sun, the mother-of-two, 29, is the brunette involved in the fight which took place on Friday evening on the seafront.

The video was shot by a bystander on their phone and sees five black women scuffling with a white woman, after she reportedly called one of them a ‘f***ing black c***,’ and yelling, ‘f*** Black Lives Matter!’

Drama-on-sea! It has been claimed that former EastEnders actress Katie Jarvis is the woman featured in a video of a pub brawl in Essex – leading to an arrest for ‘racially aggravated public order’

The clip sees the group of women brawling in the outside drinking area of the Papillon pub in Southend-on-Sea, before it spills out onto the street.

The video was posted to Facebook and has been viewed over 20,000 times, picked up first by local paper The Chelmsford & Mid-Essex Times.

The publication published Essex police’s statement about the incident, which said: ‘A 29-year old woman was arrested on Friday 31 July just after 10.05pm following reports of a disturbance in Marine Parade, Southend.

‘She has been arrested on suspicion of assault and racially aggravated public order. She has been released on bail until Friday 21 August.’

Reports: According to The Sun, the mother-of-two, 29, is the brunette involved in the fight which took place on Friday evening on the seafront [pictured 2009]

Reports: According to The Sun, the mother-of-two, 29, is the brunette involved in the fight which took place on Friday evening on the seafront [pictured 2009]

Violent! The video was shot by a bystander on their phone and sees five black women scuffling with a white woman, after she reportedly called one of them a 'f***ing black c***,' and yelling, 'f*** Black Lives Matter!'

Violent! The video was shot by a bystander on their phone and sees five black women scuffling with a white woman, after she reportedly called one of them a ‘f***ing black c***,’ and yelling, ‘f*** Black Lives Matter!’

MailOnline has contacted Katie’s rep for comment. 

The clip sees the women screaming at one another as they all stumble into the street, towards the road.

The pub’s sign is pushed over and punters are seen dodging out the way as the group of women repeatedly strike the woman believed to be Katie.

The sounds of glasses smashing can be heard as another woman attempts to break the fight up, with a man then getting involved.

Scuffle! The clip sees the group of women brawling in the outside drinking area of the Papillon pub in Southend-on-Sea, before it spills out onto the street

Scuffle! The clip sees the group of women brawling in the outside drinking area of the Papillon pub in Southend-on-Sea, before it spills out onto the street

ID'd? Katie was identified by a witness who says they heard the woman yell 'I'm a famous actress!' as her friends chimed in with, 'She’s Hayley Slater from EastEnders!' [pictured in the soap in 2018]

ID’d? Katie was identified by a witness who says they heard the woman yell ‘I’m a famous actress!’ as her friends chimed in with, ‘She’s Hayley Slater from EastEnders!’ [pictured in the soap in 2018]

At this point, the police pull up in a van to intervene.

Katie was identified by a witness who says they heard the woman yell ‘I’m a famous actress!’ as her friends chimed in with: ‘She’s Hayley Slater from EastEnders!’ 

It’s understood that the tiff began when Katie took a chair from the group of women’s table  

A witness  claimed: ‘I couldn’t believe it. Police arrested her and Katie was saying “I haven’t done anything wrong!”‘

Actress Katie has two children – Lillie Mae, 11, and Alfie, eight. 

She was involved in a bar brawl in March 2019, when she was ‘glassed by a drunken Irish man’ on a night out in London.

Brawl! She was involved in a bar brawl in March 2019, when she was 'glassed by a drunken Irish man' on a night out in London

Brawl! She was involved in a bar brawl in March 2019, when she was ‘glassed by a drunken Irish man’ on a night out in London

Follow up: After this, she sent a message to fans to reassure them that she was ok after the incident

Follow up: After this, she sent a message to fans to reassure them that she was ok after the incident

She was treated by medical staff after the attack, said to have been out in Romford when she was attacked.

At the time, she tweeted her thanks to the police service for ‘looking after’ her.

She said: ‘Big thank you to the Met police tonight and ambulance service for looking after me after I was glassed by a drunken Irish man for f*** all.’

However, she later deleted the tweet after fans spotted it and inquired after her well-being.

She later posted: ‘Thanks lovely lot I’m good as gold.’

Family affair: Katie joined the Eastenders cast in 2018 as the cousin of Kat Slater [Jessie Wallace]. One of her storylines saw her have an affair with Kat's husband Alfie Moon [Shane Richie] while they lived in Spain with Kat and their children

Family affair: Katie joined the Eastenders cast in 2018 as the cousin of Kat Slater [Jessie Wallace]. One of her storylines saw her have an affair with Kat’s husband Alfie Moon [Shane Richie] while they lived in Spain with Kat and their children

She then thanked fans and sent out a tweet to ‘put minds at rest’, posting: ‘Ok to put people’s minds, and questions to rest. I am absolutely fine thank you so much for all your concern and checking in on me but i’m a soldier and been through a hell of alot worse.

‘Now you can start focusing your concerns on some real news. ‘Love you all xx’ 

According to The Mirror her agent refused to discuss the incident.

She said: ‘I have no comment to make to any newspaper on any subject to do with anything. Whatever it is I don’t want to hear.’

She made headlines last year when it was revealed she had become a security guard at bargain store B&M in Romford, East London, following her departure from EastEnders.

Career move: She made headlines last year when it was revealed she had become a security guard at bargain store B&M in Romford, East London, following her departure from EastEnders [pictured on the soap in 2018]

Career move: She made headlines last year when it was revealed she had become a security guard at bargain store B&M in Romford, East London, following her departure from EastEnders [pictured on the soap in 2018]

Speaking out: She then appeared on Victoria Derbyshire to admit she had felt 'hurt and embarrassed' for being 'made to feel ashamed for having a normal job'

Speaking out: She then appeared on Victoria Derbyshire to admit she had felt ‘hurt and embarrassed’ for being ‘made to feel ashamed for having a normal job’

She was pictured outside the store on a break last October, having a coffee and a cigarette, leading to much attention from soap fans.

She then appeared on Victoria Derbyshire, followed by an interview with Grazia magazine, to admit she had felt ‘hurt and embarrassed’ for being ‘made to feel ashamed for having a normal job’.

She added that she was proud to speak out on behalf of hard-working single mums because providing for her family is paramount to her.

Katie said: ‘It’s the nature of being an actor; gigs come and go, and after my contract with EastEnders ended in February, I found a new job as soon as I could. Doing work like this is also what keeps me grounded.’

Katie revealed she ‘crumbled’ and was left in tears after a friend alerted her to the front page news.

Honest: She added that she was proud to speak out on behalf of hard-working single mums because providing for her family is paramount to her

Honest: She added that she was proud to speak out on behalf of hard-working single mums because providing for her family is paramount to her

Katie said: 'It's the nature of being an actor; gigs come and go, and after my contract with EastEnders ended in February, I found a new job as soon as I could. Doing work like this is also what keeps me grounded' [pictured on the soap with Danny Dyer in 2018]

Katie said: ‘It’s the nature of being an actor; gigs come and go, and after my contract with EastEnders ended in February, I found a new job as soon as I could. Doing work like this is also what keeps me grounded’ [pictured on the soap with Danny Dyer in 2018]

But upon reflection and thanks to the support of fellow thespians from Tamzin Outwaite to Nathalie Emmanuel, she is ‘proud’ to have changed the conversation.

‘Their support gave me the strength to speak out and stand up for hard-working people – especially single mums’, she said, and insisted her priority in life is caring for her two children, saying: ‘As long as I’m providing for them, nothing else matters. Everything I do is for them.’

She said she is proud to take on any work she can to ‘keep busy and learn new things’.   

Katie pointed that ‘all actors go through it over the years, I’ve had so many jobs in between and not just being a security guard.’

‘At 17 when I got [first movie role] Fish Tank I was doing doughnuts with my uncle at the time at festivals and things like that so I’d go on there and do the food carts,’ she said. ‘I’ve been a waitress, I’ve worked at a credit card company, I’ve done admin, I’ve done all types of things.’

Working girl: She said she is proud to take on any work she can to 'keep busy and learn new things'

Working girl: She said she is proud to take on any work she can to ‘keep busy and learn new things’

New career: Katie's character was last seen on screen in February 2019 [pictured with co-star Gillian Wright]

New career: Katie’s character was last seen on screen in February 2019 [pictured with co-star Gillian Wright]

Promising: Katie, from Dagenham, found fame in Hollywood before winning a part in the BBC soap, starring in 2009 movie Fish Tank

Promising: Katie, from Dagenham, found fame in Hollywood before winning a part in the BBC soap, starring in 2009 movie Fish Tank

Katie added that when she first saw the photos of herself she felt ashamed but is now proud that she’s doing all she can to provide for her family. 

‘One of my sisters she calls me a dabbler because I seem to do a bit of everything and I like to be busy and I like to learn new things, it doesn’t matter what it is,’ she told Victoria Derbyshire.

She added: ‘The people I work with there are amazing, they get up every single day, they work hard for their money and it doesn’t matter what job you’re doing, I don’t feel like anyone should be made to feel like how I felt when I woke up do you know what I mean, because I think as long as you’re working that’s all that matters.’

Katie said being a security guard isn’t easy and that she actually works alongside her sister at the bargain store, explaining: ‘A lot goes into being a security guard, they put themselves at risk. I took that job on and joined my sister because she’s a security guard there.’ 

Katie joined the Eastenders cast in 2018 as the cousin of Kat Slater [Jessie Wallace].

Stars: Katie starred opposite Michael Fassbender in the cult hit

Stars: Katie starred opposite Michael Fassbender in the cult hit

Comeback? BBC bosses were said to be keeping the door open for her character to return

Comeback? BBC bosses were said to be keeping the door open for her character to return

One of her storylines saw her have an affair with Kat’s husband Alfie Moon [Shane Richie] while they lived in Spain with Kat and their children.

Hayley then fell pregnant, giving birth to daughter Cherry.

Dramatic scenes aired over the subsequent Christmas season, leading to a shocking showdown between Hayley, Alfie and Kat. In one scene, Hayley pushed Alfie down a flight of stairs.

Katie’s character was last seen on screen in February 2019 when Stacey Fowler, played by Lacey Turner, went to hospital to collect her after treatment for her mental health. 

The troubled young mum had discharged herself and taken off. But BBC bosses were said to be keeping the door open for her return.

Katie, from Dagenham, found fame in Hollywood before winning a part in the BBC soap, starring in 2009 movie Fish Tank. 

Cuban business owner decries BLM’s ‘mafia tactics’ after letter

Cuban restaurant owner in Louisville reveals how BLM sent him blackmail letter with diversity demands that he was told to meet or risk social media shaming, a public boycott and his storefront ‘f***** with’

  • Dozens of businesses in Louisville, Kentucky, received letters from BLM protesters on July 24 
  • The protesters wrote a list of demands for the businesses that would increase diversity 
  • The list includes ensuring that at least 23% of staff are black and that 23% of the business’s inventory comes from black owned retailers
  • The activists say that the area was unfairly gentrified after the demolition of a housing complex in the 2000s and that it’s time to correct an imbalance 
  • Fernando Martinez claims though one protester told him to agree to the demands or risk having his restaurant ‘f****d with’ 
  • He says while he supports the movement, he won’t be told how to run his business 
  • SCROLL DOWN FOR FULL LIST OF DEMANDS AND ‘REPERCUSSIONS FOR NON-COMPLIANCE’ 

This is the list of demands Martinez and other business owners received 

A Cuban restaurant owner in Louisville is slamming Black Lives Matter activists for sending him and other small business owners a list of diversity demands that they were told to meet or risk repercussions like ‘having their store fronts ‘f****d with’.

The letter went out to business owners in East Market District in Louisville, also known as NuLu, during a protest on July 24 that forced some of the businesses in the area to close.

It demanded that businesses employ at least 23 percent black staff, bought at least 23 percent of their inventory from black retailers or make a recurring donation of 1.5 percent of their net sales to a local black charity, and that they should display a sign showing their support for the movement.  

It also listed a series of ‘repercussions’ if the businesses didn’t comply which included a boycott, social media shaming, and an ‘invasive reclamation’ whereby black owned businesses with competing goods of services would set up ‘booths and tables’ outside the store fronts. 

They say that the neighborhood has been able to flourish after the demolition of a housing project in the 2000s that robbed the black community of opportunities and wiped out their homes. 

Fernando Martinez, who owns La Bodeguita de Mima, claims that one of the activists warned him: ‘You better put the letter on the door so your business is not f*cked with.’ 

On July 24, protesters shut down the neighborhood and, according to Martinez, issued threats to businesses

On July 24, protesters shut down the neighborhood and, according to Martinez, issued threats to businesses

Fernando Martinez, the restaurant owner, and other members of the Cuban community on Sunday protesting against the BLM list of demands

Fernando Martinez, the restaurant owner, and other members of the Cuban community on Sunday protesting against the BLM list of demands 

For the next two days after the protest, he claims he kept his restaurant closed because staff feared for their safety. It meant that more than 30 staff members were not able to earn a paycheck.

He took to Facebook to accuse them of ‘mafia tactics’ and said that while he respects the movement and wants to support it, it’s unfair for his business and safety to be threatened. 

‘There comes a time in life that you have to make a stand and you have to really prove your convictions and what you believe in.  

‘All good people need to denounce this. How can you justified (sic) injustice with more injustice?’ he wrote on Facebook.

On Sunday, he spoke at a rally with other members of the Cuban community to express their support for BLM but also share their position that they shouldn’t be strong-armed into anything. 

This is the letter that BLM activists gave to businesses in the East Market District of Louisville, Kentucky, on July 24

This is the letter that BLM activists gave to businesses in the East Market District of Louisville, Kentucky, on July 24 

‘There are people out there who are trying to define who I am as a man, who I am as a businessman, and who we are as a community.  

‘We need to come together as a community. We’re not an enemy of the Black community. 

‘The Cuban community is not the enemy of the Black community. 

‘La Bodeguita is open to everybody. If you’re gay, this is your home. If you’re Black, this is your home. If you’re White, this is your home. If you’re human, this is your home,’ he said.

Another said: ‘The reason we are here is because the system, because socialism doesn’t work. It doesn’t work.’  

Ahamara Brewster, who belongs to Revolutionary Black Panther Party, also denounced the approach. 

‘You’re attacking a Black-brown establishment, but you’re in the name of Black Lives Matter? Wait a minute, something’s weird about this,’ she said. 

The BLM protesters in Louisville say the list was not a set of demands but that they want to start a conversation with local businesses. 

Some have agreed to their requests, they said.