HMS Queen Elizabeth ‘will be sent to the Far East to take part in military drills with US and Japan’


One of Britain’s new £3billion aircraft carriers could be sent to the Far East under new plans drawn up by military chiefs, reports today suggest.

The class leading HMS Queen Elizabeth is expected to visit the region during its maiden grand voyage next year.

The aircraft carrier is set to be involved in joint military exercises with allies such as the United States and Japan during the visit, according to the Times today.

The move is likely to be seen as a counter to China’s increasingly assertive attitude in the region and beyond.

And the reports of the voyage comes amid growing tension between London and Beijing, as well as the government’s row over whether to include Chinese tech firm Huawei over security fears and growing pressure from America to exclude them from the process.

The class leading HMS Queen Elizabeth is expected to visit the Far East during its maiden grand voyage next year

The HMS Queen Elizabeth (pictured right with sister ship HMS Prince of Wales - left) is set to be involved in joint military exercises with allies such as the United States and Japan during the visit, according to the Times.

The HMS Queen Elizabeth (pictured right with sister ship HMS Prince of Wales – left) is set to be involved in joint military exercises with allies such as the United States and Japan during the visit, according to the Times. 

On its Far East voyage The Queen Elizabeth is to be accompanied by other warships, including two Type 45 destroyers and two frigates, while it will also have two squadrons of F-35B Lightning II jets (pictured)

On its Far East voyage The Queen Elizabeth is to be accompanied by other warships, including two Type 45 destroyers and two frigates, while it will also have two squadrons of F-35B Lightning II jets (pictured)

On its Far East voyage The Queen Elizabeth is to be accompanied by other warships, including two Type 45 destroyers and two frigates, while it will also have two squadrons of F-35B Lightning II jets.

It is likely one of those squadrons will be from the RAF while the other could be from the US Marine Corps, the Times reports. 

As well as taking part in military exercises, the carrier, which along with its sister ship HMS Prince of Wales is the largest ever built by the British Navy, will also provide a platform for trade talks, the Times, quoting an unnamed defence source, reports.

The HMS Prince of Wales, which also cost £3billion, is said to be around 18 months behind its sister ship in terms of deployment.

Once completed, defence chiefs hope to base one of the carriers in the Indo-Pacific region.

A source told the Times: ‘One carrier will support Nato in the North Atlantic.

The HMS Prince of Wales (pictured) is said to be around 18 months behind its sister ship in terms of deployment.

The HMS Prince of Wales (pictured) is said to be around 18 months behind its sister ship in terms of deployment.

It is likely one of those squadrons of F-35B fighter jets (pictured) will be from the RAF while the other could be from the US Marine Corps, the Times reports

It is likely one of those squadrons of F-35B fighter jets (pictured) will be from the RAF while the other could be from the US Marine Corps, the Times reports

‘Where else are you going to put the other? On the main trade routes and to counter the emerging threat of China.’ 

Meanwhile the Ministry of Defence last night said ‘no decision’ had been taken on the HMS Queen Elizabeth’s deployment.

It comes as ministers fear China could unleash a devastating online attack on Britain – dubbed a ‘cyber-9/11’ – amid increasing tensions between London and Beijing.

Senior sources say ‘a perfect storm’ of diplomatic rows over Hong Kong, the tech giant Huawei and Covid-19 could lead to an all-out attack by Chinese-backed hackers.

The warning comes as the Government prepares to formally announce a U-turn that would block Huawei from helping build Britain’s superfast 5G mobile network.

After Australia adopted a similar hard line, it was hit by a sustained large-scale cyber attack.

Boris Johnson has also infuriated the Chinese Communist Party with his tough stance on Beijing’s clampdown on Hong Kong’s freedoms and calls for an inquiry into the true source of coronavirus, which is suspected to have accidentally leaked from a Wuhan laboratory.

Senior sources say ‘a perfect storm’ of diplomatic rows over Hong Kong , the tech giant Huawei and Covid-19 could lead to an all-out attack by Chinese-backed hackers (file photo)

Senior sources say ‘a perfect storm’ of diplomatic rows over Hong Kong , the tech giant Huawei and Covid-19 could lead to an all-out attack by Chinese-backed hackers (file photo)

Security chiefs fear that, in a worst-case scenario, state-sponsored attacks would cripple computer networks, leading to phone and power blackouts and bringing hospitals, government and businesses to a halt.  

Meanwhile ministers are braced for a backlash from Beijing today when they confirm a ban on Huawei’s involvement in the 5G network.

Culture Secretary Oliver Dowden will announce that telecoms firms will be banned from installing new equipment supplied by the Chinese giant by Christmas.

He will also order firms to rip out all existing Huawei kit by the middle of this decade.

Huawei executives held last-ditch talks yesterday with officials from the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport and the National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) in the hope of watering down the plans. 

The Huawei ban follows intense pressure from Donald Trump to deny China a foothold in the West’s critical infrastructure.

Tough American sanctions have prevented the firm from using any US-patented technology in its microchips

But a Whitehall source said the ban would go ahead, adding: ‘It’s fair to say Huawei won’t be very happy with the result.’ 

Inside Britain’s most powerful warship, HMS Queen Elizabeth

At 280 metres long, with a lifespan of half a century and a flight deck of four acres, HMS Queen Elizabeth is Britain’s largest and most powerful warship ever built.

Here are the facts and figures behind the vessel which was officially commissioned into the Royal Navy December 7, 2017

HMS Queen Elizabeth, pictured,  weighs some 65,000 tonnes and has a top speed of 25 knots and a four-acre flight deck

HMS Queen Elizabeth, pictured, weighs some 65,000 tonnes and has a top speed of 25 knots and a four-acre flight deck

  • The aircraft carrier weighs 65,000 tonnes and has a top speed in excess of 25 knots.
  • A number of ship building yards around the country were involved in the build – these include Govan and Scotstoun in Glasgow, Appledore in Devon, Cammell Laird in Birkenhead, Wirral, A&P on the Tyne in Newcastle and Portsmouth.
  • A total of 10,000 people worked on construction of the ship, made up in sections at yards around the UK and transported to Rosyth, Fife, where it was assembled.
  • It is the second ship in the Royal Navy to be named Queen Elizabeth.
  • The ship has a crew of around 700, that will increase to 1,600 when a full complement of F-35B jets and Crowsnest helicopters are embarked.
  • There are 364,000 metres of pipes inside the ship, and from keel to masthead she measures 56 metres, four metres more than Niagara Falls.
  • Facilities onboard include a chapel, a medical centre and 12-bed ward, staffed with GPs, a nurse and medical assistants, as well as a dentist and dental nurse.
  • There are also five gyms on the warship which include a cardiovascular suite, two free weight rooms and a boxing gym.
  • Regular fitness circuit sessions and sporting activities such as basketball and tug of war are held in the hangar and on the flight deck, with weights and other items stored inside the flight deck ramp. 
  • The Captain of the ship was Angus Essenhigh
  • There are five galleys on the warship which is where the food is cooked and those on board eat their meals everyday. This includes two main galleys, the bridge mess and an aircrew refreshment bar.
  • The distribution network on board manages enough energy to power 30,000 kettles or 5,500 family homes.
  • Its flight deck is 280 metres long and 70 metres wide, enough space for three football pitches.
  •  The entire ship’s company of 700 can be served a meal within 90 minutes, 45 minutes when at action stations.
  • Recreational spaces enjoyed by the crew feature televisions and sofas, as well as popular board games including the traditional Royal Navy game of Uckers.
  • Each of the two aircraft lifts on HMS Queen Elizabeth can move two fighter jets from the hangar to the flight deck in 60 seconds.
  • The warship has a range of 8,000 to 10,000 nautical miles, and has two propellers – each weighing 33 tonnes and with a combined 80MW output of power – enough to run 1,000 family cars or 50 high speed trains. 

HMS Queen Elizabeth ‘will be sent to the Far East to take part in military drills with US and Japan’


One of Britain’s new £3billion aircraft carriers could be sent to the Far East under new plans drawn up by military chiefs, reports today suggest.

The class leading HMS Queen Elizabeth is expected to visit the region during its maiden grand voyage next year.

The aircraft carrier is set to be involved in joint military exercises with allies such as the United States and Japan during the visit, according to the Times today.

The move is likely to be seen as a counter to China’s increasingly assertive attitude in the region and beyond.

And the reports of the voyage comes amid growing tension between London and Beijing, as well as the government’s row over whether to include Chinese tech firm Huawei over security fears and growing pressure from America to exclude them from the process.

The class leading HMS Queen Elizabeth is expected to visit the Far East during its maiden grand voyage next year

The HMS Queen Elizabeth (pictured right with sister ship HMS Prince of Wales - left) is set to be involved in joint military exercises with allies such as the United States and Japan during the visit, according to the Times.

The HMS Queen Elizabeth (pictured right with sister ship HMS Prince of Wales – left) is set to be involved in joint military exercises with allies such as the United States and Japan during the visit, according to the Times. 

On its Far East voyage The Queen Elizabeth is to be accompanied by other warships, including two Type 45 destroyers and two frigates, while it will also have two squadrons of F-35B Lightning II jets (pictured)

On its Far East voyage The Queen Elizabeth is to be accompanied by other warships, including two Type 45 destroyers and two frigates, while it will also have two squadrons of F-35B Lightning II jets (pictured)

On its Far East voyage The Queen Elizabeth is to be accompanied by other warships, including two Type 45 destroyers and two frigates, while it will also have two squadrons of F-35B Lightning II jets.

It is likely one of those squadrons will be from the RAF while the other could be from the US Marine Corps, the Times reports. 

As well as taking part in military exercises, the carrier, which along with its sister ship HMS Prince of Wales is the largest ever built by the British Navy, will also provide a platform for trade talks, the Times, quoting an unnamed defence source, reports.

The HMS Prince of Wales, which also cost £3billion, is said to be around 18 months behind its sister ship in terms of deployment.

Once completed, defence chiefs hope to base one of the carriers in the Indo-Pacific region.

A source told the Times: ‘One carrier will support Nato in the North Atlantic.

The HMS Prince of Wales (pictured) is said to be around 18 months behind its sister ship in terms of deployment.

The HMS Prince of Wales (pictured) is said to be around 18 months behind its sister ship in terms of deployment.

It is likely one of those squadrons of F-35B fighter jets (pictured) will be from the RAF while the other could be from the US Marine Corps, the Times reports

It is likely one of those squadrons of F-35B fighter jets (pictured) will be from the RAF while the other could be from the US Marine Corps, the Times reports

‘Where else are you going to put the other? On the main trade routes and to counter the emerging threat of China.’ 

Meanwhile the Ministry of Defence last night said ‘no decision’ had been taken on the HMS Queen Elizabeth’s deployment.

It comes as ministers fear China could unleash a devastating online attack on Britain – dubbed a ‘cyber-9/11’ – amid increasing tensions between London and Beijing.

Senior sources say ‘a perfect storm’ of diplomatic rows over Hong Kong, the tech giant Huawei and Covid-19 could lead to an all-out attack by Chinese-backed hackers.

The warning comes as the Government prepares to formally announce a U-turn that would block Huawei from helping build Britain’s superfast 5G mobile network.

After Australia adopted a similar hard line, it was hit by a sustained large-scale cyber attack.

Boris Johnson has also infuriated the Chinese Communist Party with his tough stance on Beijing’s clampdown on Hong Kong’s freedoms and calls for an inquiry into the true source of coronavirus, which is suspected to have accidentally leaked from a Wuhan laboratory.

Senior sources say ‘a perfect storm’ of diplomatic rows over Hong Kong , the tech giant Huawei and Covid-19 could lead to an all-out attack by Chinese-backed hackers (file photo)

Senior sources say ‘a perfect storm’ of diplomatic rows over Hong Kong , the tech giant Huawei and Covid-19 could lead to an all-out attack by Chinese-backed hackers (file photo)

Security chiefs fear that, in a worst-case scenario, state-sponsored attacks would cripple computer networks, leading to phone and power blackouts and bringing hospitals, government and businesses to a halt.  

Meanwhile ministers are braced for a backlash from Beijing today when they confirm a ban on Huawei’s involvement in the 5G network.

Culture Secretary Oliver Dowden will announce that telecoms firms will be banned from installing new equipment supplied by the Chinese giant by Christmas.

He will also order firms to rip out all existing Huawei kit by the middle of this decade.

Huawei executives held last-ditch talks yesterday with officials from the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport and the National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) in the hope of watering down the plans. 

The Huawei ban follows intense pressure from Donald Trump to deny China a foothold in the West’s critical infrastructure.

Tough American sanctions have prevented the firm from using any US-patented technology in its microchips

But a Whitehall source said the ban would go ahead, adding: ‘It’s fair to say Huawei won’t be very happy with the result.’ 

Inside Britain’s most powerful warship, HMS Queen Elizabeth

At 280 metres long, with a lifespan of half a century and a flight deck of four acres, HMS Queen Elizabeth is Britain’s largest and most powerful warship ever built.

Here are the facts and figures behind the vessel which was officially commissioned into the Royal Navy December 7, 2017

HMS Queen Elizabeth, pictured,  weighs some 65,000 tonnes and has a top speed of 25 knots and a four-acre flight deck

HMS Queen Elizabeth, pictured, weighs some 65,000 tonnes and has a top speed of 25 knots and a four-acre flight deck

  • The aircraft carrier weighs 65,000 tonnes and has a top speed in excess of 25 knots.
  • A number of ship building yards around the country were involved in the build – these include Govan and Scotstoun in Glasgow, Appledore in Devon, Cammell Laird in Birkenhead, Wirral, A&P on the Tyne in Newcastle and Portsmouth.
  • A total of 10,000 people worked on construction of the ship, made up in sections at yards around the UK and transported to Rosyth, Fife, where it was assembled.
  • It is the second ship in the Royal Navy to be named Queen Elizabeth.
  • The ship has a crew of around 700, that will increase to 1,600 when a full complement of F-35B jets and Crowsnest helicopters are embarked.
  • There are 364,000 metres of pipes inside the ship, and from keel to masthead she measures 56 metres, four metres more than Niagara Falls.
  • Facilities onboard include a chapel, a medical centre and 12-bed ward, staffed with GPs, a nurse and medical assistants, as well as a dentist and dental nurse.
  • There are also five gyms on the warship which include a cardiovascular suite, two free weight rooms and a boxing gym.
  • Regular fitness circuit sessions and sporting activities such as basketball and tug of war are held in the hangar and on the flight deck, with weights and other items stored inside the flight deck ramp. 
  • The Captain of the ship was Angus Essenhigh
  • There are five galleys on the warship which is where the food is cooked and those on board eat their meals everyday. This includes two main galleys, the bridge mess and an aircrew refreshment bar.
  • The distribution network on board manages enough energy to power 30,000 kettles or 5,500 family homes.
  • Its flight deck is 280 metres long and 70 metres wide, enough space for three football pitches.
  •  The entire ship’s company of 700 can be served a meal within 90 minutes, 45 minutes when at action stations.
  • Recreational spaces enjoyed by the crew feature televisions and sofas, as well as popular board games including the traditional Royal Navy game of Uckers.
  • Each of the two aircraft lifts on HMS Queen Elizabeth can move two fighter jets from the hangar to the flight deck in 60 seconds.
  • The warship has a range of 8,000 to 10,000 nautical miles, and has two propellers – each weighing 33 tonnes and with a combined 80MW output of power – enough to run 1,000 family cars or 50 high speed trains. 

World map based on Google data illustrates where nationalities most want to go on holiday in 2021 


Britons want to go to the Maldives, Americans to Japan and Australians to Fiji: World map based on Google data illustrates nationalities’ most wished for 2021 holiday destinations

  • On the map country names have been supplemented by its residents’ most yearned-for destinations for 2021 
  • Map was created by a holiday firm, which analysed the most-searched holiday destinations for 131 countries 
  • In Asia, the UAE and Canada are joint top as the most commonly Googled destinations for 2021 

Advertisement

Most nationalities are desperate for a holiday – and a fascinating reworked world map illustrates where they most want to visit.

On the map – generated using Google search data – country names have been supplemented by its residents’ most yearned-for destinations for 2021, when international travel should be much less troublesome.

Britons apparently most want to go to the Maldives, Americans to Japan and Australians to Fiji.

Most nationalities are desperate for a holiday – and a fascinating reworked world map illustrates where they most want to visit in 2021

The map was created by luxury holiday firm Kuoni, which analysed the most-searched 2021 holiday destinations for 131 countries.

It also reveals that the French most want to go to Belgium, the Spanish to Italy and Russians to Mexico.

Mexicans, it turns out, want to go to Qatar. And Qataris to Sri Lanka.

Continent by continent, the Maldives is the top holiday destination for Europeans next year

Continent by continent, the Maldives is the top holiday destination for Europeans next year

Kuoni said that globally the most popular 2021 destination is the United Arab Emirates, followed by Qatar, Canada and the USA in joint second place and Egypt in third

Kuoni said that globally the most popular 2021 destination is the United Arab Emirates, followed by Qatar, Canada and the USA in joint second place and Egypt in third

The UAE, meanwhile, is popular with Pakistanis, Indians and Libyans.

And what about the Maldivians? They most want to go to Mauritius.

Back in Europe, and it seems that those in the Czech Republic are searching for getaways to Zanzibar, people in Finland for holidays to Norway, and Norwegians for holidays in Australia.

For New Zealanders, it’s all about Bali, and for those in Papua New Guinea – it’s all about New Zealand. While for Brazilians, it’s Aruba that’s No1 for a break next year.

For New Zealanders, it's all about Bali. But for Australians - it's Fiji that's the priority for 2021

For New Zealanders, it’s all about Bali. But for Australians – it’s Fiji that’s the priority for 2021

This map shows where various African nationalities most want to visit in 2021. If a country is grey with no additional nation, it means that no data was available for it

This map shows where various African nationalities most want to visit in 2021. If a country is grey with no additional nation, it means that no data was available for it

In Asia, the UAE and Canada are joint top as the most commonly Googled destinations for 2021, Kuoni said

In Asia, the UAE and Canada are joint top as the most commonly Googled destinations for 2021, Kuoni said

Brazilians most want to go to the island of Aruba in the southern Caribbean Sea in 2021

Brazilians most want to go to the island of Aruba in the southern Caribbean Sea in 2021

Kuoni said that globally the most popular 2021 destination is the United Arab Emirates, followed by Qatar, Canada and the USA in joint second place and Egypt in third.

Continent by continent, the Maldives is the top holiday destination for Europeans next year.

In Asia, the UAE and Canada are joint top as the most commonly Googled destinations for 2021 and the UAE is also No1 in Africa. In contrast, Peru is the most popular 2021 destination in South America.

Dean Harvey, marketing director at Kuoni, commented: ‘With various stages of lockdown still the case for many places around the world, it’s not surprising that lots of us want to book something to look forward to.

‘It’s fascinating to see how popular destinations differ from country to country and the upturn in Google searches matches the upturn in 2021 bookings we’ve seen in recent weeks, with Maldives holidays being booked the most.’

World map based on Google data illustrates where nationalities most want to go on holiday in 2021 


Britons want to go to the Maldives, Americans to Japan and Australians to Fiji: World map based on Google data illustrates nationalities’ most wished for 2021 holiday destinations

  • On the map country names have been supplemented by its residents’ most yearned-for destinations for 2021 
  • Map was created by a holiday firm, which analysed the most-searched holiday destinations for 131 countries 
  • In Asia, the UAE and Canada are joint top as the most commonly Googled destinations for 2021 

Advertisement

Most nationalities are desperate for a holiday – and a fascinating reworked world map illustrates where they most want to visit.

On the map – generated using Google search data – country names have been supplemented by its residents’ most yearned-for destinations for 2021, when international travel should be much less troublesome.

Britons apparently most want to go to the Maldives, Americans to Japan and Australians to Fiji.

Most nationalities are desperate for a holiday – and a fascinating reworked world map illustrates where they most want to visit in 2021

The map was created by luxury holiday firm Kuoni, which analysed the most-searched 2021 holiday destinations for 131 countries.

It also reveals that the French most want to go to Belgium, the Spanish to Italy and Russians to Mexico.

Mexicans, it turns out, want to go to Qatar. And Qataris to Sri Lanka.

Continent by continent, the Maldives is the top holiday destination for Europeans next year

Continent by continent, the Maldives is the top holiday destination for Europeans next year

Kuoni said that globally the most popular 2021 destination is the United Arab Emirates, followed by Qatar, Canada and the USA in joint second place and Egypt in third

Kuoni said that globally the most popular 2021 destination is the United Arab Emirates, followed by Qatar, Canada and the USA in joint second place and Egypt in third

The UAE, meanwhile, is popular with Pakistanis, Indians and Libyans.

And what about the Maldivians? They most want to go to Mauritius.

Back in Europe, and it seems that those in the Czech Republic are searching for getaways to Zanzibar, people in Finland for holidays to Norway, and Norwegians for holidays in Australia.

For New Zealanders, it’s all about Bali, and for those in Papua New Guinea – it’s all about New Zealand. While for Brazilians, it’s Aruba that’s No1 for a break next year.

For New Zealanders, it's all about Bali. But for Australians - it's Fiji that's the priority for 2021

For New Zealanders, it’s all about Bali. But for Australians – it’s Fiji that’s the priority for 2021

This map shows where various African nationalities most want to visit in 2021. If a country is grey with no additional nation, it means that no data was available for it

This map shows where various African nationalities most want to visit in 2021. If a country is grey with no additional nation, it means that no data was available for it

In Asia, the UAE and Canada are joint top as the most commonly Googled destinations for 2021, Kuoni said

In Asia, the UAE and Canada are joint top as the most commonly Googled destinations for 2021, Kuoni said

Brazilians most want to go to the island of Aruba in the southern Caribbean Sea in 2021

Brazilians most want to go to the island of Aruba in the southern Caribbean Sea in 2021

Kuoni said that globally the most popular 2021 destination is the United Arab Emirates, followed by Qatar, Canada and the USA in joint second place and Egypt in third.

Continent by continent, the Maldives is the top holiday destination for Europeans next year.

In Asia, the UAE and Canada are joint top as the most commonly Googled destinations for 2021 and the UAE is also No1 in Africa. In contrast, Peru is the most popular 2021 destination in South America.

Dean Harvey, marketing director at Kuoni, commented: ‘With various stages of lockdown still the case for many places around the world, it’s not surprising that lots of us want to book something to look forward to.

‘It’s fascinating to see how popular destinations differ from country to country and the upturn in Google searches matches the upturn in 2021 bookings we’ve seen in recent weeks, with Maldives holidays being booked the most.’

Japanese girl, three, starves to death after her mother left her alone for eight days


Japanese girl, three, starves to death after her mother left her alone for eight days so she could visit her boyfriend 600 miles away

  • Saki Kakehashi, 24, from Tokyo, told police she thought ‘it would be alright’
  • She left her daughter Noa at their apartment and went to Kagoshima Prefecture
  • Kakehashi had gone to visit her boyfriend – an almost two hour flight away
  • Kakehashi arrived home after eight days to find her toddler unresponsive

A three-year-old girl has starved to death in Japan after her mother left her alone for eight days so she could go and visit her boyfriend 600 miles away.

Saki Kakehashi, 24, from Tokyo, told police she did not expect her daughter Noa to die of severe dehydration and hunger.

The divorcée said she thought ‘it would be alright’ to leave the child alone in their apartment in the city’s Ota Ward, The Japan Times reported. 

Kakehashi was visiting her lover in Kagoshima Prefecture on Kyushu island at the country’s southern most tip, an almost two hour flight away from Tokyo.

Saki Kakehashi, 24, from Tokyo, told police she did not expect her daughter Noa to die of severe dehydration and hunger

Kakehashi was arrested on Tuesday, almost a month after she had arrived home on June 13 to find her daughter unresponsive in the apartment.

She had called the emergency services to tell them Noa was not breathing.

The girl was found to be wearing a nappy which had not been changed for days and had rashes on her bottom. 

The apartment was also filled with rubbish. 

An autopsy found that the toddler had thymic atrophy, a typical symptom of abused children, and her stomach was empty, a source told the Times.

Kakehashi is said to have claimed at first that Noa had been ill for several days but that she did not have the funds to take her to hospital.

However, she has since admitted to the allegations against her.

According to Noa’s nursery, the girl had not attended for more than a year.

Carlos Ghosn ‘wired £650,000 to firm run by man who smuggled him out of Japan’


Former Nissan Motor Co. Chairman Carlos Ghosn wired more than £650,000 to a company linked to one of the men accused of helping smuggle him out of Japan in a box last year, prosecutors said in a new court filing.

Prosecutors filed documents Tuesday detailing two wire transfers made by Ghosn in October 2019 as evidence they say shows Michael Taylor and Peter Taylor ‘have the resources with which to flee and therefore should continue to remain detained as flight risks.’

The documents show two wire transfers to the company Promote Fox LLC, which prosecutors say is managed by Peter Taylor.

Michael Taylor, a 59-year-old U.S. Army Special Forces veteran, and his 27-year-old son Peter Taylor are wanted in Japan on allegations that they helped Ghosn flee the country in December while he was out on bail and awaiting trial on financial misconduct allegations.

This handout video grab image released by The Istanbul Police Department on January 17, 2020, shows Michael Taylor (second from right) and George Antoine Zayek (centre) at passport control in Istanbul Airport, two men accused of helping fugitive businessman Carlos Ghosn escape via an Istanbul airport, as he fled a corruption trial in Japan

Former U.S. Green Beret Michael Taylor

Former U.S. Green Beret Michael Taylor

Federal prosecutors in Massachusetts said that former U.S. Green Beret Michael Taylor (left and right) and his son, Peter Taylor, helped Ghosn last year flee to Lebanon to avoid trial in Japan over alleged financial wrongdoing 

Carlos Ghosn, 65, fled japan where he faced corruption charges. He is pictured here arriving at a Tokyo court in April last year

The Taylors are urging a judge to order their immediate release from jail while they challenge Japan’s extradition request, arguing among other things that their health is in danger behind bars because of the coronavirus pandemic. 

Their lawyers say the men don’t pose a risk of flight or danger to the community.

The defense says the Taylors were unlawfully arrested and argue they can’t be extradited because ‘bail jumping’ is not a crime in Japan and, therefore, helping someone evade their bail conditions isn’t a crime either.

‘Even assuming the Taylors were properly arrested, holding them without bail on a tenuous charge in a jail that has been plagued by COVID-19 violates their Fifth and Eighth Amendment rights,’ their attorneys told a judge in a filing this week. 

‘This is especially the case because neither is a risk of flight and there are undoubtedly conditions under which they can be released.’

Ghosn has now claimed that Hollywood has approached him for a new movie about his daring escape

Ghosn has now claimed that Hollywood has approached him for a new movie about his daring escape

Ghosn is now holed up inside a mansion in Beirut with wife Carole and says he plans to fight for justice from the country (pictured, security outside)

Ghosn is now holed up inside a mansion in Beirut with wife Carole and says he plans to fight for justice from the country (pictured, security outside)

Authorities say the Taylors helped sneak Ghosn out of the Japan on a private jet with former Nissan boss tucked away in a large box.  

The flight went first to Turkey, then to Lebanon, where Ghosn has citizenship but which has no extradition treaty with Japan.

Ghosn said he fled because he could not expect a fair trial, was subjected to unfair conditions in detention and was barred from meeting his wife under his bail conditions. 

Ghosn has said he is innocent of allegations he under-reported his future income and committed a breach of trust by diverting Nissan money for his personal gain.    

Ghosn fled to his home in Lebanon (pictured) where he joined his wife after fleeing Japan

Ghosn fled to his home in Lebanon (pictured) where he joined his wife after fleeing Japan 

Businessman Carlos Ghosn - who escaped by hiding in these music cases - said he had no choice but to flee Japan because he claimed he had no chance of a fair trial

Businessman Carlos Ghosn – who escaped by hiding in these music cases – said he had no choice but to flee Japan because he claimed he had no chance of a fair trial

Turkish police officers escort suspects, accused of involvement of Nissan's former CEO Carlos Ghosn passage through Istanbul, after he fled Japan, in Istanbul, Friday, Jan. 3, 2020

Turkish police officers escort suspects, accused of involvement of Nissan’s former CEO Carlos Ghosn passage through Istanbul, after he fled Japan, in Istanbul, Friday, Jan. 3, 2020

Despite the father and son’s pleas, a US judge said she is unlikely to release the pair.   

At yesterday’s hearing in Boston, U.S. District Judge Indira Talwani said she was ‘anticipating’ denying expedited bail to the Taylor’s, who are being housed at the suburban Norfolk County Correctional Centre. 

Another aspect to their defence is the elevated risks they face since 36 inmates and staff tested positive for Covid-19 at their jail.  

Carlos Ghosn was pictured celebrating New Year's Eve with wife Carole (right) in Beirut after he managed to escape from house arrest in Japan

Carlos Ghosn was pictured celebrating New Year’s Eve with wife Carole (right) in Beirut after he managed to escape from house arrest in Japan

The residence of former auto tycoon Carlos Ghosn is seen in Tokyo on January 3

The residence of former auto tycoon Carlos Ghosn is seen in Tokyo on January 3

The defence argues that Michael is at elevated risk because part of his left lung had been removed.

Ghosn had been under house arrest in Japan on financial crimes charges until late December, when he was smuggled in a large black box to a private jet and flown to Beirut, his childhood home. 

Lebanon has no extradition treaty with Japan. Prosecutors on Tuesday said Ghosn wired £683,800 to a company co-managed by Peter Taylor two months before the escape.

Carlos Ghosn, 65, fled japan where he faced corruption charges. He is pictured here arriving at a Tokyo court in April last year

Carlos Ghosn, 65, fled japan where he faced corruption charges. He is pictured here arriving at a Tokyo court in April last year

Ghosn took a bullet train from Tokyo to Osaka (inset) before flying from Kansai Airport onto Beirut via Istanbul

Ghosn took a bullet train from Tokyo to Osaka (inset) before flying from Kansai Airport onto Beirut via Istanbul

Ghosn and his wife Carole (pictured together at a press conference in January) were barred from speaking to each other for months while he was under house arrest in Tokyo

Ghosn and his wife Carole (pictured together at a press conference in January) were barred from speaking to each other for months while he was under house arrest in Tokyo 

At Wednesday’s hearing, federal prosecutor Stephen Hassink said the Taylors’ multiple property and familial ties to Lebanon justified their detention.

‘These two defendants present probably the greatest risk not only of fleeing, but also being successful in that flight that I’ve certainly seen in my time arguing for detention,’ Hassink said.

Abbe Lowell, a lawyer for the Taylors, countered that jail was too great a health risk.

‘I am not going to be the Dr. Fauci telling Mr. Hassink what the risks are’ of incarceration, Lowell said, referring to top U.S. infectious disease expert Anthony Fauci. ‘What we do know is that prisons have been incubators.’  

Carlos Ghosn’s escape to Beirut  

  • Billionaire businessman Carlos Ghosn was first arrested on 19 November 2018 for questioning over allegations of false accounting.  
  • On 21 December 2018, he was re-arrested on suspicion of shifting to Nissan personal losses of US$16.6 million related to a personal swap contract in October 2008. 
  • In March 2019, Ghosn was granted a request for bail in a Tokyo court, subject to stringent conditions. 
  • On 30 December 2019 it emerged that Ghosn had fled Japan for Lebanon while out on bail. Ghosn later confirmed these reports through a statement which claimed that he would ‘no longer be held hostage by a rigged Japanese justice system where guilt is presumed, discrimination is rampant and basic human rights are denied.’ 
  • Despite being under 24 hour surveillance, it is understood Ghosn left his Tokyo apartment at around 14:30 on 29 December and joined two men at a nearby hotel before the three of them boarded a bullet train from Tokyo to Osaka and arrived at a hotel near Kansai International Airport just after 8pm. 
  • A few hours later, two men left the hotel carrying large containers, including an instrument box which Ghosn had squeezed himself into. The men boarded a Bombardier Global Express private jet with Turkish registration TC-TSR. The large box carrying Ghosn was never x-rayed or checked by customs officials, because it was too big to fit inside the x-ray machine.  
  • The plane departed Kansai Airport at 11.10pm local time, arriving at Istanbul Ataturk Airport at 5.26am on the morning of December 30. Within an hour of the plane’s landing, a separate private jet left for Beirut. 

Carlos Ghosn ‘wired £650,000 to firm run by man who smuggled him out of Japan’


Former Nissan Motor Co. Chairman Carlos Ghosn wired more than £650,000 to a company linked to one of the men accused of helping smuggle him out of Japan in a box last year, prosecutors said in a new court filing.

Prosecutors filed documents Tuesday detailing two wire transfers made by Ghosn in October 2019 as evidence they say shows Michael Taylor and Peter Taylor ‘have the resources with which to flee and therefore should continue to remain detained as flight risks.’

The documents show two wire transfers to the company Promote Fox LLC, which prosecutors say is managed by Peter Taylor.

Michael Taylor, a 59-year-old U.S. Army Special Forces veteran, and his 27-year-old son Peter Taylor are wanted in Japan on allegations that they helped Ghosn flee the country in December while he was out on bail and awaiting trial on financial misconduct allegations.

This handout video grab image released by The Istanbul Police Department on January 17, 2020, shows Michael Taylor (second from right) and George Antoine Zayek (centre) at passport control in Istanbul Airport, two men accused of helping fugitive businessman Carlos Ghosn escape via an Istanbul airport, as he fled a corruption trial in Japan

Carlos Ghosn, 65, fled japan where he faced corruption charges. He is pictured here arriving at a Tokyo court in April last year

The Taylors are urging a judge to order their immediate release from jail while they challenge Japan’s extradition request, arguing among other things that their health is in danger behind bars because of the coronavirus pandemic. 

Their lawyers say the men don’t pose a risk of flight or danger to the community.

The defense says the Taylors were unlawfully arrested and argue they can’t be extradited because ‘bail jumping’ is not a crime in Japan and, therefore, helping someone evade their bail conditions isn’t a crime either.

‘Even assuming the Taylors were properly arrested, holding them without bail on a tenuous charge in a jail that has been plagued by COVID-19 violates their Fifth and Eighth Amendment rights,’ their attorneys told a judge in a filing this week. 

‘This is especially the case because neither is a risk of flight and there are undoubtedly conditions under which they can be released.’

Authorities say the Taylors helped sneak Ghosn out of the Japan on a private jet with former Nissan boss tucked away in a large box.  

The flight went first to Turkey, then to Lebanon, where Ghosn has citizenship but which has no extradition treaty with Japan.

Ghosn said he fled because he could not expect a fair trial, was subjected to unfair conditions in detention and was barred from meeting his wife under his bail conditions. 

Ghosn has said he is innocent of allegations he under-reported his future income and committed a breach of trust by diverting Nissan money for his personal gain.    

Ghosn fled to his home in Lebanon (pictured) where he joined his wife after fleeing Japan

Ghosn fled to his home in Lebanon (pictured) where he joined his wife after fleeing Japan 

Businessman Carlos Ghosn - who escaped by hiding in these music cases - said he had no choice but to flee Japan because he claimed he had no chance of a fair trial

Businessman Carlos Ghosn – who escaped by hiding in these music cases – said he had no choice but to flee Japan because he claimed he had no chance of a fair trial

Turkish police officers escort suspects, accused of involvement of Nissan's former CEO Carlos Ghosn passage through Istanbul, after he fled Japan, in Istanbul, Friday, Jan. 3, 2020

Turkish police officers escort suspects, accused of involvement of Nissan’s former CEO Carlos Ghosn passage through Istanbul, after he fled Japan, in Istanbul, Friday, Jan. 3, 2020

Despite the father and son’s pleas, a US judge said she is unlikely to release the pair.   

At yesterday’s hearing in Boston, U.S. District Judge Indira Talwani said she was ‘anticipating’ denying expedited bail to the Taylor’s, who are being housed at the suburban Norfolk County Correctional Centre. 

Another aspect to their defence is the elevated risks they face since 36 inmates and staff tested positive for Covid-19 at their jail. 

The defence argues that Michael is at elevated risk because part of his left lung had been removed.

Ghosn had been under house arrest in Japan on financial crimes charges until late December, when he was smuggled in a large black box to a private jet and flown to Beirut, his childhood home.

Lebanon has no extradition treaty with Japan. Prosecutors on Tuesday said Ghosn wired £683,800 to a company co-managed by Peter Taylor two months before the escape.

At Wednesday’s hearing, federal prosecutor Stephen Hassink said the Taylors’ multiple property and familial ties to Lebanon justified their detention.

‘These two defendants present probably the greatest risk not only of fleeing, but also being successful in that flight that I’ve certainly seen in my time arguing for detention,’ Hassink said.

Abbe Lowell, a lawyer for the Taylors, countered that jail was too great a health risk.

‘I am not going to be the Dr. Fauci telling Mr. Hassink what the risks are’ of incarceration, Lowell said, referring to top U.S. infectious disease expert Anthony Fauci. ‘What we do know is that prisons have been incubators.’  

Penguins can fire their faeces with such power they reach more than FOUR FEET away


Penguins can fire their faeces out of their rectum with such power they reach more than FOUR FEET away, scientists find

  • Penguins have a high ‘rectal pressure’ that can expel excrement some distance
  • This lets them keep themselves and their nests from getting soiled with guano 
  • Experts from Japan calculated just how far Humboldt penguins can propel poop
  • They found it equivalent to a human defecating to a distance of 10 feet away 

Much has been said recently about the safe social distance to keep from each other. When dealing with penguins, however, it seems ‘one metre’ is clearly not enough.

Experts from Japan have found that the aquatic birds can fire their faeces out of their rectum with such power they reach more than four feet (1.2 meters) away.

Their high ‘rectal pressure’ — which sees faeces fly at some 4.5 mph — allows penguins to ensure that both they and their nests stay unsoiled when they defecate.

This dynamic discharging, however, forces zookeepers to be wary of approaching penguins from behind when visiting their enclosures. 

Experts from Japan have found that the aquatic birds can fire their faeces out of their rectum with such power they reach more than four feet away. Pictured, a Humboldt penguin

In their study, physicist Hiroyuki Tajima of Kochi University and Fumiya Fujisawa of Katsurahama Aquarium set out to calculate how far Humboldt penguins can fire their faeces — as well as the rectal pressure required to accomplish such a feat.

‘The flying distance of penguin’s faeces reaches about 0.4 metres [1.3 feet] even on the ground,’ the duo wrote in their paper.

While this may seem only a short distance, it is equivalent to the average height of Humboldt penguins themselves.

Moreover, penguins typically nest on rocks raised around 6.6 feet (2 metres) above ground — meaning that their gushing guano can go further still.

‘We found that penguin keepers should keep a distance of longer than 1.34 metres [4.4 feet] from penguins trying to eject faeces in the Katsurahama aquarium,’ the team wrote in their paper.

The researchers also calculated that the pressure inside a Humboldt penguin’s digestive track should reach around 28 kilopascals.

To put this in more relatable terms, this pressure in a human — one presumes with a decidedly aggressive stomach ache — expelling excrement to around a whopping 10 feet (or 3 metres) away.

Any person capable of such an impressive feat, the researchers conclude, ‘should not use usual rest rooms.’

‘Although we assume an ideal situation to obtain the numerical value, one can easily understand the incredible power of penguin’s rectum in this way,’ they added.

The aquatic bird's high 'rectal pressure' — which sees faeces fly at some 4.5 mph when expelling from a typical 6.6 foot-high roost — allows penguins to ensure that both they and their nests stay unsoiled when they defecate

The aquatic bird’s high ‘rectal pressure’ — which sees faeces fly at some 4.5 mph when expelling from a typical 6.6 foot-high roost — allows penguins to ensure that both they and their nests stay unsoiled when they defecate

The study is a ‘crucial’ contribution that is ‘moving the science forward’, natural materials expert Chris Holland of the University of Sheffield told The Times — while cautioning that the team’s pressure calculations may be a little off.

‘There is surprisingly little known about the flow properties of animal faeces. As a result in this paper they have had to treat it as a Newtonian fluid, which means their best projections may be an overestimate.’

‘In reality faeces is more likely to be Non-Newtonian — a “funny fluid” — and far more complex,’ he said.

‘In the future it would be useful to understand the surface tension of the faeces so that one could predict if it is likely to jet or mist upon release, and how it would splash, so that the workers could take measures [to avoid it] accordingly.’

A pre-print of the researchers’ article, which has not yet been peer-reviewed, can be read on the arXiv repository. 

P-P-Pooping penguins: the researchers also calculated that the pressure inside a Humboldt penguin's digestive track should reach around 28 kilopascals. Pictured: in their paper, the researchers modelled a penguin's digestive system as a cylindrical tank with radius R and sphincter aperture radius r, allowing them to calculate the stomach pressure, P

P-P-Pooping penguins: the researchers also calculated that the pressure inside a Humboldt penguin’s digestive track should reach around 28 kilopascals. Pictured: in their paper, the researchers modelled a penguin’s digestive system as a cylindrical tank with radius R and sphincter aperture radius r, allowing them to calculate the stomach pressure, P

Volcanic island in the Pacific Ocean is experiencing a ‘growth spurt’


Volcanic island in the Pacific Ocean is experiencing a ‘growth spurt’ – adding nearly 500 feet of land in under a month

  • Nishinoshima, a volcanic island,  sits some 600 miles south of Tokyo, Japan 
  • Experts observed multiple eruptions since May that have added to its land mass
  • Since June, some 500 feet has been added to the island’s surface
  • Since 2013, the volcanic island has grown at least 12 times its size 

A volcanic island some 600 miles south of Japan is experiencing a ‘vigorous growth spurt.’

Nishinoshima, which first emerged from the sea in the 1970s, has expanded an additional 500 feet from June 19 through July 3.

The Japan Coast Guard note that activity of the young volcano appeared to started late May and by June, ash has detected as high as 27,200 feet that contributed to the expansion.

Nishinoshiman has grown 12 times its initial size since 2015 when it merged with a smaller island created by an underwater volcano.

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A volcanic island some 600 miles south of Japan is experiencing a ‘vigorous growth spurt.’ Nishinoshima, which first emerged from the sea in the 1970s, has expanded an additional 500 feet from June 19 through July 3

For more than a month in 2015 an underwater volcano in the Pacific Ocean spewed ash and magma to the surface, and high into the air.

The dramatic build-up created a new island, just off the coast of Tonga, in a region known as the Ring of Fire. The island, called Hunga Tonga, was found to be around 0.6 miles wide and composed mostly of ash.

But due to its weak structure, experts had believed the small island would deteriorate into the water.

However, the small islet merged with Nishinoshima – resulting in the larger island growing 12 times its initial size.

NASA released a satellite image from July 4 that shows heat signature of erupting lava and cooling of the dark plume ash blowing to the north.

NASA released a satellite image from July 4 that shows heat signature of erupting lava and cooling of the dark plume ash blowing to the north.

NASA’s Aqua satellite acquired the natural-color image above on July 6, when the volcanic plume stretched hundreds of miles to the north and rose several thousand miles into the sky

NASA’s Aqua satellite acquired the natural-color image above on July 6, when the volcanic plume stretched hundreds of miles to the north and rose several thousand miles into the sky

Now, Nishinoshima seems to be more awake and has had multiple eruptions over the past few months that have added land to its surface.

The Japan Coast Guard reported a powerful explosion on July 1 that generated a dense dark ash plume that rose approximately 11,482 feet into the air.

NASA released a satellite image from July 4 that shows heat signature of erupting lava and cooling of the dark plume ash blowing to the north.

Nishinoshima seems to be more awake and has had multiple eruptions over the past few months that have added land to its surface

Nishinoshima seems to be more awake and has had multiple eruptions over the past few months that have added land to its surface

Japan officials say the activity began around late May and on July 3 the volcanic plume rose as high as 15,400 feet and the next day ash was detected at 27,200 feet- the highest plume on record since 2013.

Tokyo Institute of Technology Professor Nogami Kenji told Japan’s NHK news agency that the volcano appears to be the most active now and is being fueled by ‘massive supplies of underground magma.’

According to Japan’s NHK news agency, researchers from the Geospatial Information Authority of Japan say the southern part of the island has expanded by almost 500 feet from June 19 to July 3.

Japan launches new 223mph N700S bullet train that can escape to safety in the event of an earthquake


Japan launches new 223mph bullet train that can ‘escape’ to safety in the event of an earthquake

  • The N700S serves the Tokaido Shinkansen line which connects Tokyo with Osaka and Kobe
  • It became the world’s first high-speed line when the first bullet trains began running on it on October 1, 1964 
  • The train has an active suspension system and lithium-ion batteries so it can run without the overhead lines

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A new bullet train has entered service in Japan that’s the country’s fastest, smoothest, most comfortable and safest yet – it’s able to ‘escape’ to safety in the event of an earthquake.

The N700S – the ‘s’ stands for ‘Supreme’ – has a top speed of 360kph (223mph), though the line it serves, the Tokaido Shinkansen line, has a maximum operating speed of 285kph (177mph).

This line, which links Tokyo with Osaka and Kobe, is one of the world’s most famous. It became the world’s first high-speed line when the first bullet trains began running on it on October 1, 1964, between Tokyo and Osaka – and it passes the 12,400ft-high Mount Fuji.

A new bullet train – the N700S (pictured) – has entered service in Japan that’s the country’s fastest, smoothest, most comfortable and safest yet – it’s able to ‘escape’ to safety in the event of an earthquake

The N700S – the ‘s’ stands for ‘Supreme’ – has a top speed of 360kph (223mph), though the line it serves, the Tokaido Shinkansen line, has a maximum operating speed of 285kph (177mph)

The N700S – the ‘s’ stands for ‘Supreme’ – has a top speed of 360kph (223mph), though the line it serves, the Tokaido Shinkansen line, has a maximum operating speed of 285kph (177mph)

The summit of Mt Fuji has been considered sacred since ancient times and bullet train staff have been known to bow to it as the train passes.

While the N700S, which entered service on July 1, looks very similar to the N700A trains it’s replacing, it boasts a number of impressive new features.

The seats, according to CNN, can recline further, have individual power outlets and the overhead racks light up at each station to remind passengers to pick up their bags.

An active suspension system makes the ride quieter and smoother and lithium-ion batteries enable the train to move without using power from the overhead lines.

While the N700S looks very similar to the N700A trains it’s replacing, it boasts a number of impressive new features

While the N700S looks very similar to the N700A trains it’s replacing, it boasts a number of impressive new features

The seats on the N700S can recline further, have individual power outlets and the overhead racks light up at each station to remind passengers to pick up their bags

The seats on the N700S can recline further, have individual power outlets and the overhead racks light up at each station to remind passengers to pick up their bags

An active suspension system makes the ride quieter and smoother and lithium-ion batteries enable the N700S to move without using power from the overhead lines

An active suspension system makes the ride quieter and smoother and lithium-ion batteries enable the N700S to move without using power from the overhead lines

The entire Shinkansen network is wired up to earthquake sensors. If a tremor is detected, the bullet trains stop automatically. But the N700S, thanks to its battery packs, can trundle to a safer spot if it comes to a halt somewhere risky

The entire Shinkansen network is wired up to earthquake sensors. If a tremor is detected, the bullet trains stop automatically. But the N700S, thanks to its battery packs, can trundle to a safer spot if it comes to a halt somewhere risky

This feature is particularly useful in the event of an earthquake.

The entire Shinkansen network is wired up to earthquake sensors. If a tremor is detected, the bullet trains stop automatically.

But the N700S, thanks to its battery packs, can trundle to a safer spot if it comes to a halt somewhere risky, such as a bridge or tunnel.

Hitachi, which has been building bullet trains since the 1960s, brought bullet train technology to the UK.

In 2009 it introduced the country’s fastest domestic train – the Javelin – which runs at 140mph between London St Pancras International and Kent.

BULLET TRAIN FAST FACTS 

The first bullet train, built by Hitachi, began operating on October 1, 1964, between Tokyo and Osaka.

If bullet trains are more than one minute behind schedule they are considered officially ‘late’.

If bullet trains are more than five minutes behind schedule, the company operating them must explain themselves to the government.

Hitachi, which has been building bullet trains since the 1960s, brought bullet train technology to the UK. In 2009 it introduced the country’s fastest domestic train – the Javelin (pictured at St Pancras) – which runs at 140mph

Hitachi, which has been building bullet trains since the 1960s, brought bullet train technology to the UK. In 2009 it introduced the country’s fastest domestic train – the Javelin (pictured at St Pancras) – which runs at 140mph

The average bullet train delay is around 30 seconds.

The bullet train network passenger fatality record – in 55 years of operation – is zero.

Hitachi, which has been building bullet trains since the 1960s, brought bullet train technology to the UK. In 2009 it introduced the country’s fastest domestic train – the Javelin – which runs at 140mph between London St Pancras International and Kent. 

Bullet trains aren’t just quiet for passengers on the inside – they’re quiet when they speed past for people on the outside too. They never exceed 75 decibels while running. For comparison, a passenger car travelling at 65mph, 25 feet away makes 77 dB of noise. 

Shinkansen carriages are 0.3metres wider than high-speed trains in Europe.

The latest bullet trains use about half the electricity that a Eurostar uses.

The network is wired up to earthquake sensors. If a tremor is detected, the bullet trains stop automatically.

The summit of Mt Fuji has been considered sacred since ancient times and bullet train staff have been known to bow to it as the train passes.