The best cars made in Britain – from supercars to runarounds

With European-built cars imported to the UK set to become around £1,500 more expensive from next year, home-made motors are likely to be in higher demand than ever before.

The Government confirmed in May that vehicles imported from the EU will be subject to a 10 per cent tariff from 2021, and trade bodies have warned that manufacturers will pass these charges onto buyers in Britain by ramping up model prices.

Fortunately, there is a way of steering clear of unwelcome price rises, by purchasing new cars that have been assembled in UK factories.

But what are the options for home-grown automotive talent? We’ve broken it down into nine different car categories and named three brilliant models that are bolted together by British workforces around the country.

Built in Britain: Want to know which models are produced at home? We’ve listed 27 cars across 9 different categories to help you choose

Unless the Government negotiates a free trade agreement with the EU between now and the end of the Brexit transition period – which is due to terminate on 31 December 2020 – some of Britain’s most popular cars are going to be even pricier in 2021.

That includes best sellers like the Ford Fiesta, Volkswagen Golf and Mercedes-Benz A-Class.

But you can avoid these premiums entirely by buying a car that’s built in Britain – and it will be a decision that helps one of the nation’s biggest industries at a very difficult period. 

In the first six months of 2020, UK car manufacturing is down 43 per cent, mainly due to the impact of Covid-19.. 

Trade bodies have warned that the industry is now on course to produce just over 880,000 new cars this year –  the lowest output since 1957 – and that over 13,000 jobs have been lost from the sector during the pandemic. 

It means buying British-made cars has never been more important. And there are great motors to choose from. Here are our picks in different categories:

SMALLER CARS 

Nissan Juke 

Built in: Sunderland, Tyne & Wear

The first thing to note about the latest Nissan Juke is that it's an all-round much better looking car than the model it replaced. It also has plenty of equipment and a quality cabin

The first thing to note about the latest Nissan Juke is that it’s an all-round much better looking car than the model it replaced. It also has plenty of equipment and a quality cabin

 While the original Juke had Marmite looks, the latest example – built in Sunderland – should be attractive to a much wider audience.

It might be considered a crossover, but in terms of dimensions it’s similar to the Micra supermini. That means it’s ideal for motorists who predominantly want a car to drive through towns and cities.

It is in a ultra-competitive market, so there are plenty of rivals to choose from. In fact, there have been more super-compact-SUVs brought to market than any other car type in recent years. Where the Juke trumps the rest is plush interior quality, safety levels you’d expect from a much bigger car and lots of equipment.

Mini Hatchback

Built in: Oxford, Oxfordshire

The Mini hatchback, which is built at Plant Oxford, is one of the top-choice premium superminis you can buy on the market. It comes with an accomplished set of engines and plenty of retro appeal

The Mini hatchback, which is built at Plant Oxford, is one of the top-choice premium superminis you can buy on the market. It comes with an accomplished set of engines and plenty of retro appeal

There are few things more British than the iconic original Mini. And while the brand is now owned by BMW, the hatchback models (and the Clubman estate) are still built on UK shores.

Plant Oxford is the home of these cars, including the all-new Mini Electric, which it has already built 11,000 examples of – 3,000 of which have been produced for UK customers.

If it’s retro looks, a prestige badge and lots of quality you’re after, the Hatch won’t disappoint. The range of potent and frugal engines is impressive, even if interior space and luggage capacity is a little limited.

Nissan Leaf

Built in: Sunderland, Tyne & Wear

Price: from £26,845 (inclusive of £3,000 Gov grant)

The Leaf is proof of the UK's car manufacturing sector producing the latest-generation vehicles, with the pure-electric Nissan being one of Europe's best-selling EVs

The Leaf is proof of the UK’s car manufacturing sector producing the latest-generation vehicles, with the pure-electric Nissan being one of Europe’s best-selling EVs

The Mini Electric isn’t the only zero-emission car produced in the UK. Nissan’s Leaf has also been built in Sunderland since the first-generation car was introduced to market in 2010.

The second-installment of the plug-in model boasts improved driving ranges, with 168 miles from the standard Leaf and a claimed 239 from the Leaf E+. This tech comes at a cost, though, with the latter priced from an eye-watering £33,295, even when you knock off the £3,000 from the Government Plug-in Car Grant.

While it will ultimately be classed as a medium-size family hatchback based on its outer dimensions, most buyers opt for the model with the shorter driving range that’s tailored for city living.

MEDIUM CARS

Toyota Corolla

Built in: Burnaston, Derbyshire 

Toyota started production of the current-generation Corolla at the Burnaston plant in January 2019. It offers low running costs and great reliability

Toyota started production of the current-generation Corolla at the Burnaston plant in January 2019. It offers low running costs and great reliability 

The Corolla is the UK’s newcomer in this category, having been revealed in 2018 as a replacement for the outgoing Auris. While it might have a new (or returning) name, it shares the same Toyota principles and focus on hybrid powertrains.

Corolla officially went into production in the UK in January 2019 at the Burnaston plant and offers a family-size hatchback with exceptionally low running costs.

While other cars in the segment are more fun to drive – the Ford Focus, for instance – comfort levels in the Corolla are almost unmatched in the small family car segment. And the reliability record is bulletproof. 

Vauxhall Astra

Built in: Ellesmere Port, Cheshire 

While the Astra doesn't exceed in any particular area, it's a good all-rounder for anyone looking for a medium-size family hatchback

While the Astra doesn’t exceed in any particular area, it’s a good all-rounder for anyone looking for a medium-size family hatchback

With the Volkswagen Golf, Ford Focus and Mercedes-Benz A-Class soaking up most sales in this segment, the Astra has started to fall down the pecking order among Britons.

That’s a little unfair on the stalwart Vauxhall. It’s good to drive, has plenty of space and you can haggle a serious bargain with dealers right now. Low benefit-in-kind tax makes it an attractive option for company car drivers, too..

Production at the Ellesmere Port facility restarts this months, having been closed since the middle of March.  

Honda Civic

Built in: Swindon, Wiltshire

Honda has confirmed that it will close its Swindon plant in July 2021, meaning a loss of 3,500 jobs as production of the Civic returns to Japan

Honda has confirmed that it will close its Swindon plant in July 2021, meaning a loss of 3,500 jobs as production of the Civic returns to Japan

It’s a sad story for Honda in the UK, with the Swindon plant due to close in July 2021. The factory employs around 3,500 staff and produced 109,000 cars last year, making its loss a huge blow for British car making.

But it does mean that for the next 11 months or so, you will still be able to get your hands on a Swindon-made Civic. And you won’t be disappointed if you do.

The latest generation car is responsive to drive, has a big boot and comes with lots of standard kit. Reliability is impressive too, so the futuristic-looking Honda should endure the test of time.

LARGE CARS/COMPACT SUVS

Nissan Qashqai

Built in: Sunderland, Tyne & Wear 

The Qashqai has been the mot popular SUV in the UK for over a decade. While Britons don't need to be persuaded to buy them, there are more rivals - some of them very good indeed - looking to steal sales away

The Qashqai has been the mot popular SUV in the UK for over a decade. While Britons don’t need to be persuaded to buy them, there are more rivals – some of them very good indeed – looking to steal sales away

Britons don’t need much encouragement to buy a Qashqai. It’s been the best-selling SUV in the UK for over a decade, with motorists taken by the looks and practicality.

Produced at Nissan Sunderland – the biggest single production facility in the country – it is facing tougher and tougher competition as the market expands, with models like the Seat Ateca and Skoda Karoq giving it a good run for its money these days.

The 1.3-litre DIG-T 140 petrol engine is impressive, and means you don’t need to have a diesel in an SUV. It’s one of the cars that Britain’s motor industry hinges on.

Jaguar XE

Built in: Castle Bromwich, West Midlands

When Jaguar launched the XE in 2015, it knew it had some serious competition to face. Taking on BMW's 3 Series is no small task

When Jaguar launched the XE in 2015, it knew it had some serious competition to face. Taking on BMW’s 3 Series is no small task

The BMW 3 Series, Mercedes-Benz C-Class and Audi A4 have dominated the compact saloon segment for decades, but Jaguar threw its hat into the ring with the XE in 2015, produced at the firm’s Castle Bromwich factory.

While it might not have the practicality and interior glam of the competition – and small executive saloons have fallen deeply out of fashion – it’s brilliant to drive and comes with plenty of kit if you choose the right specification grade.

It’s availability in the US has increased sales, but in the UK it’s still relatively underappreciated. It might be one of the cars to become more appealing when Brexit takes shape.

Range Rover Evoque

 Built in: Halewood, Merseyside

The current Range Rover Evoque is an impressive compact SUV. It might be more expensive than most in the sector, but it also depreciates slower than just about any other compact SUV

The current Range Rover Evoque is an impressive compact SUV. It might be more expensive than most in the sector, but it also depreciates slower than just about any other compact SUV

The Evoque was Range Rover’s first proper punt at a luxurious compact SUV. Most will remember the first generation model built from 2011 being partly designed by Victoria Beckham and about as dependable as her husband in a World Cup quarter final against Argentina.

But the second-gen Evoque – made in Halewood –  is vastly improved. It drives well, has a gorgeous cabin and – despite the flashy looks – is as practical as the best-in-class models.

With a starting price of almost £32,000, it’s one of the most expensive compact SUVs. However, it depreciates comparatively slowly, so you have a much better chance of getting more of your money back when it comes time to sell than you would with a comparable VW or BMW. 

LARGE SUVS

Bentley Bentayga

Built in: Crewe, Cheshire 

The Bentayga is definitely the pricey option in this line-up, but we wanted to include it in the list as it just misses the cut for the next category - luxury SUVs

The Bentayga is definitely the pricey option in this line-up, but we wanted to include it in the list as it just misses the cut for the next category – luxury SUVs

The Bentayga could quite easily feature in the next list (luxury SUVs), but we’ve given it a slot here as it’s based on Audi’s own large SUV (the Q7) and is extremely practical. It has also just been refreshed in the last month, and the range could expand to include less expensive versions in the coming months.

It is the footballer’s car of choice, but you can see why. It blends supreme quality materials – the cabin being especially opulent – with supreme comfort and a high-riding motor for the first time in the British marque’s history. 

Performance and luxury are definitely its strong points, but you’ll need deep pockets to afford the Crewe-built 4X4.

Jaguar F-Pace 

Built in: Solihull, West Midlands

The F-Pace was Jaguar's first-ever SUV model. It's since been joined by the smaller E-Pace and electric I-Pace, but the other two are not manufactured in the UK

The F-Pace was Jaguar’s first-ever SUV model. It’s since been joined by the smaller E-Pace and electric I-Pace, but the other two are not manufactured in the UK

It might not seem it by the Bentley Bentayga’s standards, but Jaguar’s F-Pace SUV is still a pricey family 4X4. That said, you get a lot of quality and stunning looks for the money – and very slow depreciation.

Launched to the market in 2017 and produced at JLR’s Solihull plant, it’s been a roaring success. Proper petrolheads even have the choice of an outrageously fast SVR version, if they want a super SUV to race around in. 

Across the entire range, the F-Pace is brilliant to drive. Choose a model with smaller wheels and it’s very comfortable too. And while you might think practicality would have been overlooked when there’s so much style, that isn’t the case.   

Range Rover Velar

Built it: Solihull, West Midlands

The Velar is our favourite large Land Rover model on the market right now. With such huge demand for coupe-like SUVs, it's our choice of the bunch - mainly because it's still very practical despite the svelte design

The Velar is our favourite large Land Rover model on the market right now. With such huge demand for coupe-like SUVs, it’s our choice of the bunch – mainly because it’s still very practical despite the svelte design 

With so many Land Rover products in the sector to choose from (all built at the same Solihull plant), we’ve opted for the one we like the most – the Velar.

It’s stylish, refined and offers the appeal of a coupe SUV, which seems to be a popular choice with motorists right now.

If you don’t mind buying diesel, the D180 is a seriously competent powerplant and is an award-winning engine. Just be careful when it comes to options, as prices can start spiraling well beyond the £45,710 mark if you get carried away with the extras list.

LUXURY SUVS  

Aston Martin DBX 

Built in: St Athan, South Wales 

The £158,000 Aston Martin DBX is the new kid on the block. The SUV is fitted with the brand's most potent V8 engine yet

The £158,000 Aston Martin DBX is the new kid on the block. The SUV is fitted with the brand’s most potent V8 engine yet

The new kid on the block in the luxury SUV world is the Aston Martin DBX – and it’s built in the UK. James Bond’s favourite car maker is producing the stunning vehicle at its new St Athan factory in South Wales, with the first example coming off the production line just last month. 

The five-door, five-seater, all-wheel-drive crossover has been designed from the ground up with input from a female advisory board – and a panel of children were also enlisted to make sure it’s as family-friendly as possible.

Fitted with the brand’s most potent V8 motor yet, with 550bhp capable of propelling it from 0-to-62mph in 4.5 seconds, it will be a hoot on the road. And we’ve already driven it, but can’t tell you want it’s like until tomorrow. Stay tuned for our first drive report… 

Range Rover SVAutobiography

Built in: Ryton-on-Dunsmore, Warwickshire 

The SVAutobiography is the £130,000+ SUV for those who don't think a standard Range Rover is quite fancy enough

The SVAutobiography is the £130,000+ SUV for those who don’t think a standard Range Rover is quite fancy enough

If a standard Range Rover isn’t luxurious enough for you, you can ask the guys at Jaguar Land Rover Special Vehicle Operations in Ryton-on-Dunsmore, Coventry to make you an even fancier version of the SUV.

Called the SVAutobiography, it’s JLR’s take on a 4X4 limousine. Out goes the rear bench of the conventional model and drafted in are a pair of adjustable private-jet chairs. It’s available as a short or long-wheel-base version, with the latter offering enough leg room for professional basketball players.

It’s no slouch either. The 565hp V8 engine is the same one used in the Range Rover Sport SVR and will take you to red-carpet events in no time, with a 0-to-62mph sprint taking just 5.4 seconds and a limited top speed of 155mph. For £380,000, they’ll even make you an armour-plated version, called the ‘Sentinel’.

Rolls-Royce Cullinan 

Built in: Goodwood, Chichester 

Nothing says luxury like a Rolls-Royce, and the Cullinan is the first SUV to be adorned with the famed Spirit of Ecstasy on the bonnet

Nothing says luxury like a Rolls-Royce, and the Cullinan is the first SUV to be adorned with the famed Spirit of Ecstasy on the bonnet

When Rolls-Royce announced it would built an SUV, it was clear this would be the pinnacle for premium 4X4 cars. And it hasn’t disappointed.

If you want an opulent interior and boundless options to bespoke your car, then this is the model for you. The 6.7-litre V12 engine is effortlessly smooth and the levels of refinement are unmatched. Never has an SUV been as hushed as this. 

Not a single version will leave the factory priced at £264,000, with most featuring options that will push the total fee well beyond half a million quid. The vast majority built at Goodwood are ordered by customers in the US and Middle East. Outputs might be small but it’s a car that generates plenty of cash for the historic brand.

EXECUTIVE LIMOS

Jaguar XJ

Built in: Castle Bromwich, West Midlands  

A new Jaguar XJ is due to arrive next year, with an electric version on the way. It will continue to be built at the Castle Bromwich factory

A new Jaguar XJ is due to arrive next year, with an electric version on the way. It will continue to be built at the Castle Bromwich factory

The XJ is the longest-running model in the Jaguar line-up, and the current generation has been around for a decade now. Production has ceased, though examples are still in showrooms and you can haggle serious discounts if you want one.

It will make way for an all-new XJ, which was due to launch this year. However, Covid-19-enforced delays and work to setup the Castle Bromwich assembly line to prepare for an electrified version of the limo has seen the launch date pushed back to 2021.

The car you can get your hands on now is among the best to drive in class, but in terms of space, running costs and overall luxuriousness does fall a little short against the German competition.

Rolls-Royce Phantom

Built in: Goodwood, Chichester 

With endless options to bespoke the latest Phantom VIII, it's no surprise that most leaving the Goodwood factory cost over £1million

With endless options to bespoke the latest Phantom VIII, it’s no surprise that most leaving the Goodwood factory cost over £1million

The latest Phantom is the epitome of limousine – a car you will want to be driven in. but also enjoy driving yourself.

The V12 engine is, like the one in the Cullinan, silky smooth. The ride quality is supremely supple and the feeling of grandeur is unrivalled. With endless bespoke options – such as choosing a paint colour to exactly match your dog’s hair or a favourite lip stick – you can easily see why most Phantom’s leave the Goodwood assembly line costing over £1million.

It’s undoubtedly still the most luxurious car in the world, and Phantom VIII is almost impossible to fault. Look no further for one of the UK’s finest products.  

Bentley Flying Spur

Built in: Crewe, Cheshire 

The latest Flying Spur has one of the most glorious interiors you'll find in any motor. Bentley's potent 6-litre W12 motor isn't bad either

The latest Flying Spur has one of the most glorious interiors you’ll find in any motor. Bentley’s potent 6-litre W12 motor isn’t bad either

Bentley and Rolls-Royce have always been at battle in the premium limo market. The former’s latest offering is the new Flying Spur, which looks like an extended Continental GT (more about this later).

If you’re looking for something to make an entrance, ooze sophistication and provide a sense of occasion, it does a very good job of that. The interior is a sight to behold and the 6.0-litre W12 engine, developing 626bhp and driving all four wheels, is monumentally good

The biggest downside is the lack of all-round visibility. Not that this will be an issue for most Flying Spur buyers – though will be for their chauffeurs.  

SPORTS CARS

Lotus Elise

Built in: Hethel, Norfolk 

Compact, lightweight and a hoot to drive - the Lotus Elise (pictured, the 220 Sport) is a hair-raising sports car for enthusiastic drivers

Compact, lightweight and a hoot to drive – the Lotus Elise (pictured, the 220 Sport) is a hair-raising sports car for enthusiastic drivers

The iconic British sports car maker and former F1 team is still churning out its range of road cars in Norfolk, which next year will be joined by the stunning £2million Evija.

For those looking for cheaper thrills, the Elise is the one to consider. Compact, light and relatively basic by modern-day standards, it is a distraction-free sports car through and through – and one that’s full of sensation.

It is quite brilliant to drive, turns on a sixpence and has more grip than an Olympic weightlifter. It’s probably not one you’d want to use daily, but for a fun toy to have in the garage there are few cars that are better for less than £50,000.

Jaguar F-Type 

Built in: Castle Bromwich, West Midlands

The Jaguar F-Type isn't just gorgeous to look at, it's a refined and capable cruiser. While it's a little heavy and understeers too much for sports car standards (in our opinion), you can use it everyday

The Jaguar F-Type isn’t just gorgeous to look at, it’s a refined and capable cruiser. While it’s a little heavy and understeers too much for sports car standards (in our opinion), you can use it everyday

While the Lotus Elise is a car for special occasions and track sessions, the F-Type is definitely a sports car you can daily without any issues. There’s a choice of Coupe or Convertible (the latter coming at a premium) and either a 2.0-litre four-cylinder powerplant or the more raucous V8 engines in two power outputs and the option of rear- or all-whee;-drive.

While the smaller motor won’t provide as much drama, it is a relatively affordable sportster to run. But if you want theatre, the V8s are all superbly good.

Being front-engined, the F-Type isn’t the most direct or responsive of sports cars, but few look as good and offer as much comfort as the Castle Bromwich-built Jag.

Caterham Seven 

The Seven has been around since the 1970s, and in the last four decades the looks - and level of equipment - have barely changed. That said, nothing comes close if you're in search of the purest form of driving

The Seven has been around since the 1970s, and in the last four decades the looks – and level of equipment – have barely changed. That said, nothing comes close if you’re in search of the purest form of driving

If you want to get your hands on a sports car that’s developed a cult following, the Caterham Seven – built in Dartford, Kent – is right up your street.

Outboard wheels, no doors, and a fully detachable roof; it’s not what you’d call a modern-day vehicle. But for many, that’s the appeal. It’s super basic, incredibly involving and a blast if you’re a regular trackday goer.

It’s not going to excel in any crash tests, you get next to nothing in refinement and prices are pretty high for a cramped car you won’t drive too often. But if you’re looking for the purest form of driving, very little comes close and be as rewarding to own.

LUXURY SPORTS CARS/SUPERCARS

McLaren 570S

Built in: Woking, Surrey 

Priced at just over £150,000, the 570S is our pick of the McLaren range. Though there are models to suit all supercar tastes - with price tags to match

Priced at just over £150,000, the 570S is our pick of the McLaren range. Though there are models to suit all supercar tastes – with price tags to match

We could have included any of the British firm’s cars in this list, because every single one of them is produced at the brand’s Technology Centre in Woking.

We chose the 570S because it’s one of the most affordable – as part of the Sports Series – and also one of its best products yet. While it’s staggeringly quick, it’s also super-involving to drive at normal speeds that won’t see you handing your licence back to the DVLA. The 570GT has the same twin-turbo V8 engine as the ‘S’ but adds a small rear luggage compartment and softer suspension, if you want added practicality.

All of this, for a fraction of the price of an equivalently-fast Ferrari.

Aston Martin Vantage 

Built in: Gaydon, Warwickshire 

The Aston Martin Vantage is a arguably the best supercar in the brand's range right now. It's also the cheapest, fortunately

The Aston Martin Vantage is a arguably the best supercar in the brand’s range right now. It’s also the cheapest, fortunately

It wouldn’t be a list of supercars if we didn’t include an Aston Martin. Our pick of the selection for this list is the most affordable of the range – the Vantage that’s built at the brand’s spiritual home of Gaydon. Though we could have opted for the DB11 or DBS Superleggera, both of which are also produced in Britain.

The V8 Vantage uses a twin-turbo 4.0-litre V8 producing a whopping 503hp – good for a 0-to-62mph sprint in 3.6 seconds and top speed of 195mph. 

But it’s the looks that are the most stunning aspect; it’s arguably the best-looking model you can buy on the market today at this price point. 

Bentley Continental GT

Built in: Crewe, Cheshire 

If you want to go on a tour of Europe in something fast and luxurious, the Bentley Continental GT should be high on the list. With a W12 motor up front, there more than enough potency on tap

If you want to go on a tour of Europe in something fast and luxurious, the Bentley Continental GT should be high on the list. With a W12 motor up front, there more than enough potency on tap

The latest Continental GT comes with the choice of powerplants: a raucous V8 or a thunderous W12 motor. 

No matter which one you opt for, neither will keep up with the aforementioned McLaren and Aston Martin. 

That’s because the Continental is a true GT model, built to cruise on long-distance journeys. It manages to find a great balance between sports car and luxury car and is a worthy rival to the British-built Aston Martin DB11. The Crewe factory churns them out in relatively big numbers, with strong demand for the classy tourer at home and overseas.

WILDCARDS

Ariel Nomad

Built in: Crewkerne, Somerset

The Ariel Nomad is like nothing else that's legal to drive on the road. It has no roof and no doors, but what it lacks in panels it makes up for in pure unadulterated four-wheel fun

The Ariel Nomad is like nothing else that’s legal to drive on the road. It has no roof and no doors, but what it lacks in panels it makes up for in pure unadulterated four-wheel fun

Founded in 2001, Ariel created the world’s first ‘road-going exoskeletal car’ – the Atom. It’s a high-performance vehicle with little to no bodywork, roof or windows. That means it’s feathery light, but also ridiculously quick.

But the model to make it into our range is the off-road Nomad – which is made in Crewkerne, Somerset, and is also road legal, we should point out. 

It uses a 2.4-litre, naturally-aspirated, Honda engine that – when you taking into account the lightness of the vehicle – produces 351bhp per tonne. Fun is the agenda for this car, and it delivers it in droves. 

Morgan 3 Wheeler

Built in: Malvern, Worcestershire 

If you're looking for something that's like nothing else on the road today, the Morgan 3 Wheeler will be right up your street. It's not a car you'd use daily (especially not during the winter) but will guarantee smiles every time you take it out of the garage

If you’re looking for something that’s like nothing else on the road today, the Morgan 3 Wheeler will be right up your street. It’s not a car you’d use daily (especially not during the winter) but will guarantee smiles every time you take it out of the garage

If you thought the Ariel Nomad was like nothing you’d ever seen before, wait until you clap your eyes on the Malvern-built Morgan 3 Wheeler. No roof, no windscreen, no…fourth wheel.

The Worcestershire-based car maker describes it as a ‘rebellion against sanitised, modern motoring’ – and it’s impossible to disagree. Powering the vehicle is a motorcycle-derived 2.0-litre S&S V-Twin engine linked to an engaging five-speed manual gearbox, which takes it from 0-to-62mph in an impressive 6 seconds.

Incredibly, it weighs just over 500kg, making it extremely light and nimble despite lacking a wheel. Of all the British built models in this list, it’s the one that will ultimately be the one that will result in the biggest smiles every time you take it out of the garage. 

Eagle E-Type

Eagle GB's range of modernised E-Types are a thing to behold. They each take 6,000 man hours to built and will set owners back a hefty £650,000-plus. But just look at it...

Eagle GB’s range of modernised E-Types are a thing to behold. They each take 6,000 man hours to built and will set owners back a hefty £650,000-plus. But just look at it…

So expensive are reborn E-Types built Eagle GB, they don’t even reveal the whereabouts of their factory for security reasons. Each car takes 18 months and 6,000 man hours to produce – so it’s worth the company protecting its assets.

The firm has reinvented the classic Jaguar with a range of drop-dead-gorgeous iterations. And if those looks don’t floor you, the hefty chunk missing from your bank balance might.

While it might look like the iconic classic, it won’t be the heavy-steering, poor-braking, oil-leaking car to own like an original E-Type. Instead it uses a supercharged 4.7-litre, 345bhp engine, weights a mere 1038kg (less than a Ford Fiesta) and is fitted with modern components and electronics to make it handle infinitely better than the 1960s silhouette suggests. Not many will be able to afford one, but what a machine if you do have the required funds.

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10,000 to lose their jobs at British Airways in scramble to cut costs

More than 10,000 British Airways staff to lose their jobs as airline scrambles to cut costs

  • More than 6,000 employees across business applied for voluntary redundancy 
  • A further 4,000 were due to be told yesterday that they were being laid off 
  • Unions branded the day ‘Black Friday’ and accused BA of ‘industrial thuggery’ 

More than 10,000 British Airways staff are being made redundant as the airline scrambles to cut costs to survive the  

In a sign of the brutal cuts workers were facing at Britain’s flag carrier, more than 6,000 employees across the business applied for voluntary redundancy. 

A further 4,000 were due to be told yesterday that they were being laid off.

In a sign of the brutal cuts workers were facing at British Airways, more than 6,000 employees across the business applied for voluntary redundancy

Many of the remaining staff will suffer steep pay cuts and will see significant changes to their contracts.

Long-serving cabin crew claim they could lose up to 50 per cent or 60 per cent of their income from the shake-up – which caps the amount cut from their basic pay at 20 per cent but will strip out a number of take-home allowances. 

Unions branded the day ‘Black Friday’ and accused BA of ‘industrial thuggery’. BA has been at loggerheads with cabin crew unions Unite and GMB over the job-cutting plans, which it insists are crucial to its long-term survival.

BA’s owner IAG plunged to a £3.8billion loss during the first six months of the year after the number of passengers on its flights fell by 98 per cent in the second quarter.

The company is planning to raise £2.5billion of emergency funding, backed by its largest shareholder Qatar Airways, to shore up its finances as it fears it could take until at least 2023 for business to recover. 

Rivals including Virgin, Ryanair and Easyjet are all planning to cull jobs and slash spending to survive the crisis as they face months of lower passenger numbers.

IAG boss Willie Walsh has said Covid-19 is the biggest crisis the airline has ever faced.

A British Airways spokesman said: ‘We are having to make difficult decisions and take every possible action now to protect as many jobs as possible.’

The airline said back in April it could axe as many as 12,000 jobs to help it stay afloat during the coronavirus crisis. This is around 17 per cent of its 42,000-strong workforce.

The company has several different crew divisions – which it calls ‘fleets’ – that operate as separate units with their own contracts.

It wants to put all crew on the same terms and conditions that will see staff who have joined in the last decade potentially get a small salary increase.

Those who the company chooses to make redundant will have the option of entering the airline’s priority return pool of workers and will be fast-tracked into any roles that become available. 

But unions have blasted the move as a ‘fire and rehire’ strategy.

The tussle with cabin crew unions comes after pilots voted to accept a deal hashed out between BA and pilot union Balpa. 

The airline had originally planned to axe around 1,250 of its 4,300 pilots – but this has been cut to 270 because remaining staff will take pay cuts for three years.

The best cars made in Britain – from supercars to runarounds

With European-built cars imported to the UK set to become around £1,500 more expensive from next year, home-made motors are likely to be in higher demand than ever before.

The Government confirmed in May that vehicles imported from the EU would be subject to a 10 per cent tariff from 1 January 2021, and trade bodies have warned that manufacturers will pass these additional costs onto buyers in Britain by ramping up model prices.

Fortunately, there is a way of steering clear of unwelcome price rises – by purchasing new cars that have been assembled in UK factories.

But what are the options for home-grown automotive talent? We’ve broken it down into nine different car categories and named three brilliant models that are bolted together by British workforces around the country.

Built in Britain: Want to know which models are produced at home? We’ve listed 27 cars across 9 different categories to help you choose

Unless the Government negotiates a free trade agreement with the EU between now and the end of the Brexit transition period, which is due to terminate on 31 December 2020, some of Britain’s most popular cars are going to be even pricier in 2021.

That includes best sellers like the Ford Fiesta, Volkswagen Golf and Mercedes-Benz A-Class.

But you can avoid these premiums entirely by buying a car that’s made in Britain – and it will be a decision that will help one of the nation’s biggest industries at a very difficult period. 

In the first six months of 2020, UK car manufacturing is down 43 per cent, mainly due to the impact of Covid-19.. 

Trade bodies have warned that the industry is now on course to produce just over 880,000 new cars this year –  the lowest output since 1957 and says that over 13,000 jobs have already been cut from the sector as it tries to recover. 

It means buying British-built cars has never been more important. And there are some great ones to choose from. Here are our picks in different categories: 

SMALLER CARS 

Nissan Juke 

Built in: Sunderland, Tyne & Wear

The first thing to note about the latest Nissan Juke is that it's an all-round much better looking car than the model it replaced. It also has plenty of equipment and a quality cabin

The first thing to note about the latest Nissan Juke is that it’s an all-round much better looking car than the model it replaced. It also has plenty of equipment and a quality cabin

 While the original Juke had Marmite looks, the latest example built in Sunderland should be attractive to a wider audience.

It might be considered a crossover, but in terms of dimensions it’s similar in dimension to the Micra supermini, so is ideal for those driving through towns and cities.

It is in a ultra-competitive market, so there are plenty of rivals to choose from. In fact, there have been more super-compact-SUVs brought to market than any other car type in recent years. Where the Juke impresses is plush interior quality, safety levels you’d expect from a much bigger car and lots of equipment.

Mini Hatchback

Built in: Oxford, Oxfordshire

The Mini hatchback, which is built at Plant Oxford, is one of the top-choice premium superminis you can buy on the market. It comes with an accomplished set of engines and plenty of retro appeal

The Mini hatchback, which is built at Plant Oxford, is one of the top-choice premium superminis you can buy on the market. It comes with an accomplished set of engines and plenty of retro appeal

There are few things more British than the iconic original Mini. And while the latest generation of the branded cars are owned by BMW, the hatchback models (and the Clubman estate) are still built on UK shores.

Plant Oxford is the home of these cars, including the all-new Mini Electric, which it has already built 11,000 examples of – 3,000 of which have been produced for UK customers.

If it’s retro looks, a prestige badge and lots of quality you’re after, the Hatch won’t disappoint. The range of potent and frugal engines are impressive, even if interior space and luggage capacity is a little limited.

Nissan Leaf

Built in: Sunderland, Tyne & Wear

Price: from £26,845 (inclusive of £3,000 Gov grant)

The Leaf is more a medium-sized car than a small one, but the most popular model with a 168-mile range is more suited to town and city living rather than being a long-distance cruiser

The Leaf is more a medium-sized car than a small one, but the most popular model with a 168-mile range is more suited to town and city living rather than being a long-distance cruiser

The Mini Electric isn’t the only zero-emission car produced in the UK. Nissan’s Leaf has also been built in Sunderland since the first-generation car was introduced to the market in 2010.

The second-installment of the plug-in model boasts improved driving ranges on a full battery charge, with 168 miles from the standard Leaf and a claimed 239 from the Leaf E+, though the latter is priced from an eye-watering £33,295, even when you knock off the £3,000 from the Government Plug-in Car Grant.

While it will ultimately be classed as a medium-size family hatchback based on its outer dimensions, most will opt for the model with the shorter driving range that’s tailored more towards city living.

MEDIUM CARS

Toyota Corolla

Built in: Burnaston, Derbyshire 

Toyota started production of the current-generation Corolla at the Burnaston plant in January 2019. It offers low running costs and great reliability

Toyota started production of the current-generation Corolla at the Burnaston plant in January 2019. It offers low running costs and great reliability 

The Corolla is the UK’s newcomer in this category, having been revealed in 2018 as a replacement for the outgoing Auris. While it might have a new – well, a returning – name, it shares the same Toyota principles and focus on hybrid powertrains.

Corolla officially went into production in the UK in January 2019 at the Burnaston plant and offers a family-size hatchback with exceptionally low running costs.

While other cars in the segment are more fun to drive – the Ford Focus, for instance – comfort levels in the Corolla are almost unmatched in the small family car segment. And the reliability record is bulletproof. 

Vauxhall Astra

Built in: Ellesmere Port, Cheshire 

While the Astra doesn't exceed in any particular area, it's a good all-rounder for anyone looking for a medium-size family hatchback

While the Astra doesn’t exceed in any particular area, it’s a good all-rounder for anyone looking for a medium-size family hatchback

With the Volkswagen Golf, Ford Focus and Mercedes-Benz A-Class soaking up most of the sales in this segment, the Astra has started to fall down the pecking order.

That’s a little unfair on the stalwart Vauxhall. It’s pretty good to drive, has plenty of space and you can haggle some serious bargains with dealers. Low benefit-in-kind tax makes it an attractive option for company car drivers too..

Production at the Ellesmere Port facility restarts this months, having been closed since the middle of March.  

Honda Civic

Built in: Swindon, Wiltshire

Honda has confirmed that it will close its Swindon plant in July 2021, meaning a loss of 3,500 jobs as production of the Civic returns to Japan

Honda has confirmed that it will close its Swindon plant in July 2021, meaning a loss of 3,500 jobs as production of the Civic returns to Japan

It’s a sad story for Honda in the UK, with the Swindon plant due to close in July 2021. The factory employs around 3,500 staff and produced 109,000 cars last year, making its loss a huge blow for British car making.

But it does mean that for the next 11 months or so, you will still be able to get your hands on a Swindon-made Civic. And you won’t be disappointed if you do.

The latest generation car is responsive to drive, has a big boot and comes with lots of standard kit. Reliability is impressive too, so the futuristic-looking Honda should endure the test of time.

LARGE CARS/COMPACT SUVS

Nissan Qashqai

Built in: Sunderland, Tyne & Wear 

The Qashqai has been the mot popular SUV in the UK for over a decade. While Britons don't need to be persuaded to buy them, there are more rivals - some of them very good indeed - looking to steal sales away

The Qashqai has been the mot popular SUV in the UK for over a decade. While Britons don’t need to be persuaded to buy them, there are more rivals – some of them very good indeed – looking to steal sales away

Britons don’t need much encouragement to buy a Qashqai. It’s been the best-selling SUV in the UK for over a decade, with motorists taken by the looks and practicality.

Produced at Nissan Sunderland – the biggest single production facility in the country – it is facing tougher and tougher competition as the market expands, with models like the Seat Ateca and Skoda Karoq giving it a good run for its money these days.

The 1.3-litre DIG-T 140 petrol engine is impressive, and means you don’t need to have a diesel in an SUV. It’s one of the cars that Britain’s motor industry hinges on.

Jaguar XE

Built in: Castle Bromwich, West Midlands

When Jaguar launched the XE in 2015, it knew it had some serious competition to face. Taking on BMW's 3 Series is no small task

When Jaguar launched the XE in 2015, it knew it had some serious competition to face. Taking on BMW’s 3 Series is no small task

The BMW 3 Series, Mercedes-Benz C-Class and Audi A4 have dominated the compact saloon segment for decades, but Jaguar threw its hat into the ring with the XE in 2015, produced at the firm’s Castle Bromwich factory.

While it might not have the practicality and interior glam of the competition – and small executive saloons have fallen deeply out of fashion – it’s brilliant to drive and comes with plenty of kit if you choose the right specification grade.

It’s availability in the US has increased sales, but in the UK it’s still relatively underappreciated. It might be one of the cars to become more appealing when Brexit takes shape.

Range Rover Evoque

 Built in: Halewood, Merseyside

The current Range Rover Evoque is an impressive compact SUV. It might be more expensive than most in the sector, but it also depreciates slower than just about any other compact SUV

The current Range Rover Evoque is an impressive compact SUV. It might be more expensive than most in the sector, but it also depreciates slower than just about any other compact SUV

The Evoque was Range Rover’s first proper punt at a luxurious compact SUV. Most will remember the first generation model built from 2011 being partly designed by Victoria Beckham and about as dependable as her husband in a World Cup quarter final against Argentina.

But the second-gen Evoque – made in Halewood –  is vastly improved. It drives well, has a gorgeous cabin and – despite the flashy looks – is as practical as the best-in-class models.

With a starting price of almost £32,000, it’s one of the most expensive compact SUVs. However, it depreciates comparatively slowly, so you have a much better chance of getting more of your money back when it comes time to sell than you would with a comparable VW or BMW. 

LARGE SUVS

Bentley Bentayga

Built in: Crewe, Cheshire 

The Bentayga is definitely the pricey option in this line-up, but we wanted to include it in the list as it just misses the cut for the next category - luxury SUVs

The Bentayga is definitely the pricey option in this line-up, but we wanted to include it in the list as it just misses the cut for the next category – luxury SUVs

The Bentayga could quite easily feature in the next list (luxury SUVs), but we’ve given it a slot here as it’s based on Audi’s own large SUV (the Q7) and is extremely practical. It has also just been refreshed in the last month, and the range could expand to include less expensive versions in the coming months.

It is the footballer’s car of choice, but you can see why. It blends supreme quality materials – the cabin being especially opulent – with supreme comfort and a high-riding motor for the first time in the British marque’s history. 

Performance and luxury are definitely its strong points, but you’ll need deep pockets to afford the Crewe-built 4X4.

Jaguar F-Pace 

Built in: Solihull, West Midlands

The F-Pace was Jaguar's first-ever SUV model. It's since been joined by the smaller E-Pace and electric I-Pace, but the other two are not manufactured in the UK

The F-Pace was Jaguar’s first-ever SUV model. It’s since been joined by the smaller E-Pace and electric I-Pace, but the other two are not manufactured in the UK

It might not seem it by the Bentley Bentayga’s standards, but Jaguar’s F-Pace SUV is still a pricey family 4X4. That said, you get a lot of quality and stunning looks for the money – and very slow depreciation.

Launched to the market in 2017 and produced at JLR’s Solihull plant, it’s been a roaring success. Proper petrolheads even have the choice of an outrageously fast SVR version, if they want a super SUV to race around in. 

Across the entire range, the F-Pace is brilliant to drive. Choose a model with smaller wheels and it’s very comfortable too. And while you might think practicality would have been overlooked when there’s so much style, that isn’t the case.   

Range Rover Velar

Built it: Solihull, West Midlands

The Velar is our favourite large Land Rover model on the market right now. With such huge demand for coupe-like SUVs, it's our choice of the bunch - mainly because it's still very practical despite the svelte design

The Velar is our favourite large Land Rover model on the market right now. With such huge demand for coupe-like SUVs, it’s our choice of the bunch – mainly because it’s still very practical despite the svelte design 

With so many Land Rover products in the sector to choose from (all built at the same Solihull plant), we’ve opted for the one we like the most – the Velar.

It’s stylish, refined and offers the appeal of a coupe SUV, which seems to be a popular choice with motorists right now.

If you don’t mind buying diesel, the D180 is a seriously competent powerplant and is an award-winning engine. Just be careful when it comes to options, as prices can start spiraling well beyond the £45,710 mark if you get carried away with the extras list.

LUXURY SUVS  

Aston Martin DBX 

Built in: St Athan, South Wales 

The £158,000 Aston Martin DBX is the new kid on the block. The SUV is fitted with the brand's most potent V8 engine yet

The £158,000 Aston Martin DBX is the new kid on the block. The SUV is fitted with the brand’s most potent V8 engine yet

The new kid on the block in the luxury SUV world is the Aston Martin DBX – and it’s built in the UK. James Bond’s favourite car maker is producing the stunning vehicle at its new St Athan factory in South Wales, with the first example coming off the production line just last month. 

The five-door, five-seater, all-wheel-drive crossover has been designed from the ground up with input from a female advisory board – and a panel of children were also enlisted to make sure it’s as family-friendly as possible.

Fitted with the brand’s most potent V8 motor yet, with 550bhp capable of propelling it from 0-to-62mph in 4.5 seconds, it will be a hoot on the road. And we’ve already driven it, but can’t tell you want it’s like until tomorrow. Stay tuned for our first drive report… 

Range Rover SVAutobiography

Built in: Ryton-on-Dunsmore, Warwickshire 

The SVAutobiography is the £130,000+ SUV for those who don't think a standard Range Rover is quite fancy enough

The SVAutobiography is the £130,000+ SUV for those who don’t think a standard Range Rover is quite fancy enough

If a standard Range Rover isn’t luxurious enough for you, you can ask the guys at Jaguar Land Rover Special Vehicle Operations in Ryton-on-Dunsmore, Coventry to make you an even fancier version of the SUV.

Called the SVAutobiography, it’s JLR’s take on a 4X4 limousine. Out goes the rear bench of the conventional model and drafted in are a pair of adjustable private-jet chairs. It’s available as a short or long-wheel-base version, with the latter offering enough leg room for professional basketball players.

It’s no slouch either. The 565hp V8 engine is the same one used in the Range Rover Sport SVR and will take you to red-carpet events in no time, with a 0-to-62mph sprint taking just 5.4 seconds and a limited top speed of 155mph. For £380,000, they’ll even make you an armour-plated version, called the ‘Sentinel’.

Rolls-Royce Cullinan 

Built in: Goodwood, Chichester 

Nothing says luxury like a Rolls-Royce, and the Cullinan is the first SUV to be adorned with the famed Spirit of Ecstasy on the bonnet

Nothing says luxury like a Rolls-Royce, and the Cullinan is the first SUV to be adorned with the famed Spirit of Ecstasy on the bonnet

When Rolls-Royce announced it would built an SUV, it was clear this would be the pinnacle for premium 4X4 cars. And it hasn’t disappointed.

If you want an opulent interior and boundless options to bespoke your car, then this is the model for you. The 6.7-litre V12 engine is effortlessly smooth and the levels of refinement are unmatched. Never has an SUV been as hushed as this. 

Not a single version will leave the factory priced at £264,000, with most featuring options that will push the total fee well beyond half a million quid. The vast majority built at Goodwood are ordered by customers in the US and Middle East. Outputs might be small but it’s a car that generates plenty of cash for the historic brand.

EXECUTIVE LIMOS

Jaguar XJ

Built in: Castle Bromwich, West Midlands  

A new Jaguar XJ is due to arrive next year, with an electric version on the way. It will continue to be built at the Castle Bromwich factory

A new Jaguar XJ is due to arrive next year, with an electric version on the way. It will continue to be built at the Castle Bromwich factory

The XJ is the longest-running model in the Jaguar line-up, and the current generation has been around for a decade now. Production has ceased, though examples are still in showrooms and you can haggle serious discounts if you want one.

It will make way for an all-new XJ, which was due to launch this year. However, Covid-19-enforced delays and work to setup the Castle Bromwich assembly line to prepare for an electrified version of the limo has seen the launch date pushed back to 2021.

The car you can get your hands on now is among the best to drive in class, but in terms of space, running costs and overall luxuriousness does fall a little short against the German competition.

Rolls-Royce Phantom

Built in: Goodwood, Chichester 

With endless options to bespoke the latest Phantom VIII, it's no surprise that most leaving the Goodwood factory cost over £1million

With endless options to bespoke the latest Phantom VIII, it’s no surprise that most leaving the Goodwood factory cost over £1million

The latest Phantom is the epitome of limousine – a car you will want to be driven in. but also enjoy driving yourself.

The V12 engine is, like the one in the Cullinan, silky smooth. The ride quality is supremely supple and the feeling of grandeur is unrivalled. With endless bespoke options – such as choosing a paint colour to exactly match your dog’s hair or a favourite lip stick – you can easily see why most Phantom’s leave the Goodwood assembly line costing over £1million.

It’s undoubtedly still the most luxurious car in the world, and Phantom VIII is almost impossible to fault. Look no further for one of the UK’s finest products.  

Bentley Flying Spur

Built in: Crewe, Cheshire 

The latest Flying Spur has one of the most glorious interiors you'll find in any motor. Bentley's potent 6-litre W12 motor isn't bad either

The latest Flying Spur has one of the most glorious interiors you’ll find in any motor. Bentley’s potent 6-litre W12 motor isn’t bad either

Bentley and Rolls-Royce have always been at battle in the premium limo market. The former’s latest offering is the new Flying Spur, which looks like an extended Continental GT (more about this later).

If you’re looking for something to make an entrance, ooze sophistication and provide a sense of occasion, it does a very good job of that. The interior is a sight to behold and the 6.0-litre W12 engine, developing 626bhp and driving all four wheels, is monumentally good

The biggest downside is the lack of all-round visibility. Not that this will be an issue for most Flying Spur buyers – though will be for their chauffeurs.  

SPORTS CARS

Lotus Elise

Built in: Hethel, Norfolk 

Compact, lightweight and a hoot to drive - the Lotus Elise (pictured, the 220 Sport) is a hair-raising sports car for enthusiastic drivers

Compact, lightweight and a hoot to drive – the Lotus Elise (pictured, the 220 Sport) is a hair-raising sports car for enthusiastic drivers

The iconic British sports car maker and former F1 team is still churning out its range of road cars in Norfolk, which next year will be joined by the stunning £2million Evija.

For those looking for cheaper thrills, the Elise is the one to consider. Compact, light and relatively basic by modern-day standards, it is a distraction-free sports car through and through – and one that’s full of sensation.

It is quite brilliant to drive, turns on a sixpence and has more grip than an Olympic weightlifter. It’s probably not one you’d want to use daily, but for a fun toy to have in the garage there are few cars that are better for less than £50,000.

Jaguar F-Type 

Built in: Castle Bromwich, West Midlands

The Jaguar F-Type isn't just gorgeous to look at, it's a refined and capable cruiser. While it's a little heavy and understeers too much for sports car standards (in our opinion), you can use it everyday

The Jaguar F-Type isn’t just gorgeous to look at, it’s a refined and capable cruiser. While it’s a little heavy and understeers too much for sports car standards (in our opinion), you can use it everyday

While the Lotus Elise is a car for special occasions and track sessions, the F-Type is definitely a sports car you can daily without any issues. There’s a choice of Coupe or Convertible (the latter coming at a premium) and either a 2.0-litre four-cylinder powerplant or the more raucous V8 engines in two power outputs and the option of rear- or all-whee;-drive.

While the smaller motor won’t provide as much drama, it is a relatively affordable sportster to run. But if you want theatre, the V8s are all superbly good.

Being front-engined, the F-Type isn’t the most direct or responsive of sports cars, but few look as good and offer as much comfort as the Castle Bromwich-built Jag.

Caterham Seven 

The Seven has been around since the 1970s, and in the last four decades the looks - and level of equipment - have barely changed. That said, nothing comes close if you're in search of the purest form of driving

The Seven has been around since the 1970s, and in the last four decades the looks – and level of equipment – have barely changed. That said, nothing comes close if you’re in search of the purest form of driving

If you want to get your hands on a sports car that’s developed a cult following, the Caterham Seven – built in Dartford, Kent – is right up your street.

Outboard wheels, no doors, and a fully detachable roof; it’s not what you’d call a modern-day vehicle. But for many, that’s the appeal. It’s super basic, incredibly involving and a blast if you’re a regular trackday goer.

It’s not going to excel in any crash tests, you get next to nothing in refinement and prices are pretty high for a cramped car you won’t drive too often. But if you’re looking for the purest form of driving, very little comes close and be as rewarding to own.

LUXURY SPORTS CARS/SUPERCARS

McLaren 570S

Built in: Woking, Surrey 

Priced at just over £150,000, the 570S is our pick of the McLaren range. Though there are models to suit all supercar tastes - with price tags to match

Priced at just over £150,000, the 570S is our pick of the McLaren range. Though there are models to suit all supercar tastes – with price tags to match

We could have included any of the British firm’s cars in this list, because every single one of them is produced at the brand’s Technology Centre in Woking.

We chose the 570S because it’s one of the most affordable – as part of the Sports Series – and also one of its best products yet. While it’s staggeringly quick, it’s also super-involving to drive at normal speeds that won’t see you handing your licence back to the DVLA. The 570GT has the same twin-turbo V8 engine as the ‘S’ but adds a small rear luggage compartment and softer suspension, if you want added practicality.

All of this, for a fraction of the price of an equivalently-fast Ferrari.

Aston Martin Vantage 

Built in: Gaydon, Warwickshire 

The Aston Martin Vantage is a arguably the best supercar in the brand's range right now. It's also the cheapest, fortunately

The Aston Martin Vantage is a arguably the best supercar in the brand’s range right now. It’s also the cheapest, fortunately

It wouldn’t be a list of supercars if we didn’t include an Aston Martin. Our pick of the selection for this list is the most affordable of the range – the Vantage that’s built at the brand’s spiritual home of Gaydon. Though we could have opted for the DB11 or DBS Superleggera, both of which are also produced in Britain.

The V8 Vantage uses a twin-turbo 4.0-litre V8 producing a whopping 503hp – good for a 0-to-62mph sprint in 3.6 seconds and top speed of 195mph. 

But it’s the looks that are the most stunning aspect; it’s arguably the best-looking model you can buy on the market today at this price point. 

Bentley Continental GT

Built in: Crewe, Cheshire 

If you want to go on a tour of Europe in something fast and luxurious, the Bentley Continental GT should be high on the list. With a W12 motor up front, there more than enough potency on tap

If you want to go on a tour of Europe in something fast and luxurious, the Bentley Continental GT should be high on the list. With a W12 motor up front, there more than enough potency on tap

The latest Continental GT comes with the choice of powerplants: a raucous V8 or a thunderous W12 motor. 

No matter which one you opt for, neither will keep up with the aforementioned McLaren and Aston Martin. 

That’s because the Continental is a true GT model, built to cruise on long-distance journeys. It manages to find a great balance between sports car and luxury car and is a worthy rival to the British-built Aston Martin DB11. The Crewe factory churns them out in relatively big numbers, with strong demand for the classy tourer at home and overseas.

WILDCARDS

Ariel Nomad

Built in: Crewkerne, Somerset

The Ariel Nomad is like nothing else that's legal to drive on the road. It has no roof and no doors, but what it lacks in panels it makes up for in pure unadulterated four-wheel fun

The Ariel Nomad is like nothing else that’s legal to drive on the road. It has no roof and no doors, but what it lacks in panels it makes up for in pure unadulterated four-wheel fun

Founded in 2001, Ariel created the world’s first ‘road-going exoskeletal car’ – the Atom. It’s a high-performance vehicle with little to no bodywork, roof or windows. That means it’s feathery light, but also ridiculously quick.

But the model to make it into our range is the off-road Nomad – which is made in Crewkerne, Somerset, and is also road legal, we should point out. 

It uses a 2.4-litre, naturally-aspirated, Honda engine that – when you taking into account the lightness of the vehicle – produces 351bhp per tonne. Fun is the agenda for this car, and it delivers it in droves. 

Morgan 3 Wheeler

Built in: Malvern, Worcestershire 

If you're looking for something that's like nothing else on the road today, the Morgan 3 Wheeler will be right up your street. It's not a car you'd use daily (especially not during the winter) but will guarantee smiles every time you take it out of the garage

If you’re looking for something that’s like nothing else on the road today, the Morgan 3 Wheeler will be right up your street. It’s not a car you’d use daily (especially not during the winter) but will guarantee smiles every time you take it out of the garage

If you thought the Ariel Nomad was like nothing you’d ever seen before, wait until you clap your eyes on the Malvern-built Morgan 3 Wheeler. No roof, no windscreen, no…fourth wheel.

The Worcestershire-based car maker describes it as a ‘rebellion against sanitised, modern motoring’ – and it’s impossible to disagree. Powering the vehicle is a motorcycle-derived 2.0-litre S&S V-Twin engine linked to an engaging five-speed manual gearbox, which takes it from 0-to-62mph in an impressive 6 seconds.

Incredibly, it weighs just over 500kg, making it extremely light and nimble despite lacking a wheel. Of all the British built models in this list, it’s the one that will ultimately be the one that will result in the biggest smiles every time you take it out of the garage. 

Eagle E-Type

Eagle GB's range of modernised E-Types are a thing to behold. They each take 6,000 man hours to built and will set owners back a hefty £650,000-plus. But just look at it...

Eagle GB’s range of modernised E-Types are a thing to behold. They each take 6,000 man hours to built and will set owners back a hefty £650,000-plus. But just look at it…

So expensive are reborn E-Types built Eagle GB, they don’t even reveal the whereabouts of their factory for security reasons. Each car takes 18 months and 6,000 man hours to produce – so it’s worth the company protecting its assets.

The firm has reinvented the classic Jaguar with a range of drop-dead-gorgeous iterations. And if those looks don’t floor you, the hefty chunk missing from your bank balance might.

While it might look like the iconic classic, it won’t be the heavy-steering, poor-braking, oil-leaking car to own like an original E-Type. Instead it uses a supercharged 4.7-litre, 345bhp engine, weights a mere 1038kg (less than a Ford Fiesta) and is fitted with modern components and electronics to make it handle infinitely better than the 1960s silhouette suggests. Not many will be able to afford one, but what a machine if you do have the required funds.

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Spending data reveals pub and restaurant spending recovered in July

Spending in pubs and restaurants remains below pre-coronavirus levels but recovered throughout July, with the latest data suggesting consumers are willing to return to their pre-Covid spending ways.

Figures from Barclaycard, which processes around £1 in every £3 spent in the UK, said spending in pubs in the last week of July was down 9.4 per cent on the same week in 2019, and down 16.4 per cent in restaurants.

While these figures demonstrate that spending has not yet returned to normal levels, the figures are reveal a surprisingly resilient consumer economy.

Spending and bars, pubs and restaurants gradually recovered throughout July, figures suggest, even if consumer spending remains below normal levels

Compared to the first full week that pubs and restaurants were allowed to reopen, 6 – 12 July, spending in pubs was up by 49.2 per cent and up by 23.2 per cent in restaurants.

Kate Nicholls, the chief executive of trade association UK Hospitality, called the figures ‘a positive first step on the road to recovery for those ventures that can reopen’.

She told This is Money: ‘There are some positive, green shoots of recovery here. It’s nice to see spend in venues bouncing back after a pretty torrid few months. We mustn’t think we are out of the woods, though, and many businesses have not reopened.’  

And the British Beer and Pub Association warned this week more than one-third of pubs in the UK cannot break even one month after reopening.

UK Hospitality chief executive Kate Nicholls: 'It's nice to see spend in venues bouncing back after a pretty torrid few months'

UK Hospitality chief executive Kate Nicholls: ‘It’s nice to see spend in venues bouncing back after a pretty torrid few months’

Large swathes of the hospitality industry were handed a 15 per cent cut in the rate of VAT by Chancellor Rishi Sunak on 15 July, while restaurants will also be hoping the Government’s ‘Eat Out to Help Out’ discount scheme brings out more customers after pubs and restaurants were required to shut their doors in March. 

Businesses are keen to make the most of the good weather and pent-up demand and outperform last year’s sales figures. If Covid cases spike as summer turns to autumn and the weather gets worse, and the Government is forced to choose between opening pubs and opening schools, their fortunes could reverse dramatically. 

England’s children’s commissioner Anne Longfield said Wednesday that ‘If the choice has to be made in a local area about whether to keep pubs or schools open, then schools must always take priority.’

Consumer spending appears to be rebounding, if slowly

Figures reported last month by This is Money revealed spending in pubs and restaurants remained far below normal levels over the so-called ‘Super Saturday’ weekend, despite pictures of packed crowds in certain parts of the country.

Britain’s biggest bank Lloyds found pub spending was 65 per cent down on pre-coronavirus levels seen in February and restaurant spending 55 per cent, while Barclaycard said spending across hospitality, leisure and entertainment was lower than the same July weekend in 2019.

But the new figures suggest spending did gradually recover throughout July.

Bars, pubs and restaurants were allowed to reopen on 4 July

Bars, pubs and restaurants were allowed to reopen on 4 July

Barclaycard’s Rob Cameron said consumers were ‘becoming more confident with pre-lockdown activities’ and that, ‘while some sectors are still waiting to see an uptick in volumes, there is positive momentum and the spending trends we’ve seen over the past month will bring hope to a number of UK businesses.’

Separate analysis from the data provider CGA found a similar trend. 

Figures based off sales data from 50 companies including Greene King, Pizza Express and The Restaurant Group found sales were down 28.5 per cent year-on-year in the week of 20 July, a better performance than the nearly 40 per cent slump seen in the first week after lockdown was eased at the start of the month.

Consumers will benefit from a 50% Government discount of up to £10 a head on food and non-alcholic drinks from Monday to Wednesday in August

Consumers will benefit from a 50% Government discount of up to £10 a head on food and non-alcholic drinks from Monday to Wednesday in August

Sales were up 36.8 per cent on the week before, with nearly seven in 10 bars, pubs and restaurants open for business.

CGA’s Karl Chessell said the improvement was ‘more steady than sensational’, and restaurant chains in particular were ‘taking it cautiously as demand edges up’.

He added: ‘What will be interesting to see in the next few weeks will be the impact of the cut in VAT, the ‘Eat Out to Help Out’ campaign and also the holiday season, now that more people are expected to stay in Britain.’

A ‘v-shaped’ recovery?

Bank of England chief economist Andy Haldane told the Treasury Select Committee in July that Britain appeared to be on track for a 'v-shaped' recovery after the coronavirus shock

Bank of England chief economist Andy Haldane told the Treasury Select Committee in July that Britain appeared to be on track for a ‘v-shaped’ recovery after the coronavirus shock

With GDP figures and other economic data published months after the fact and the fast-moving changes to lockdown rules, officials have been poring over so-called fast indicators like footfall surveys and credit card and payment processing data to determine whether the UK is primed for a ‘v-shaped’ coronavirus recovery.

The UK’s service sector expanded at the fastest rate in five years last month as lockdown measures continued to be eased, with IHS Markit/CIPS Services purchasing managers’ index rising to 56.5 last month, up from 47.1 in June.

The Bank of England’s chief economist Andy Haldane told the Treasury Select Committee last month that ‘roughly half’ of the economic slump seen in March and April had since been clawed back, describing the recovery as ‘a pretty sharp one’.

He said: ‘So far it has been a V’.

Other ratesetters have disagreed, and the Bank’s monetary policy committee this week said it expected Britain’s economic recovery to be slower, even if it believed the initial damage caused by the coronavirus was less severe than previously predicted in May. 

Simon French, chief economist at investment bank Panmure Gordon, also sounded a more cautious note on the figures.

He said: ‘The first half of the rebound has happened, but you need the second half to make a V. That’s the problem with social distancing, the last 10 – 15 per cent is far harder than the first 10 – 15 per cent.’

He added: ‘A decent recovery so far misses three things. The worst is still to come as the furlough scheme is unwound; fears over a second spike have grown so you would expect a stalling despite the summer holidays; and quite a lot of this is pent up demand that will fizzle as that enthusiasm wanes.

‘Don’t get me wrong things are improving, but to get back to levels seen at the end of 2019 it’s going to be a long old road.’

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INVESTMENT EXTRA: Put your trust in tech and back the American dream

There are just 87 days to go until the US election, and seldom have Americans cast their votes in such extraordinary circumstances.

The economy is cratered, but stock markets are reaching for the skies and the victor may be the man who seemed, just a few months ago, to have little chance of occupying the Oval Office. Joe Biden, the Democratic candidate, has taken a strong polling lead over President Trump.

The situation represents a considerable dilemma for UK investors who have backed the American dream and are now wondering whether to bow out, or stick around for more thrills and spills (both are likely).

There are just 87 days to go until the US election, and seldom have Americans cast their votes in such extraordinary circumstances

America’s GDP fell by an annualised rate of 32.9 per cent in the second quarter, the steepest decline on record, and the pandemic is forecast to cost the US $8 trillion in lost growth over the next decade.

A rescue package is being delayed by rows between the Trump administration, the Republican-controlled Senate and Democrat leaders in Congress.

Meanwhile, the markets’ mood is remarkably sunny, with the Nasdaq index close to 60pc above its March lows, driven by Apple, Alphabet (Google’s parent company), Amazon, Facebook, Microsoft and Netflix.

Their ascent has been accelerated by lockdown demand for online shopping and streamed entertainment. 

Microsoft is set to acquire parts of Chinese-owned Tik Tok, the song-and-dance app, a move that exemplifies Big Tech’s insatiable appetite for more users (and their data). 

One aim of Trump’s threat to ban US companies’ dealings with TikTok is to facilitate this purchase. The Dow Jones Industrial Average and the S&P 500 index – which include fewer tech companies – are about 43 per cent higher.

Such has been the soaraway performance of markets that some consider a sudden fall to be inevitable, although a lack of return from other investments is a key factor behind the rising share prices. 

Morgan Stanley is among those warning of a possible 10 per cent stock market correction, but the bank expects this to be followed by ‘a surprising recovery in the economy and earnings later this year and into 2021’.

Others argue that the outlook is less easy to discern. Ian Heslop, co-manager of the Merian North American Equity fund, says: ‘You could follow the old rule of thumb that a Republican victory tends to be good for the markets and a Democratic victory not so good. But things are now more nuanced.’

But reflecting on a Biden presidency’s impact is still worthwhile. He may be minded to be less aggressive in dealings with China than Trump, although the effects of the current president’s stance may be hard to unravel. 

Since the 77-year-old Biden may only serve one term, his running mate choice, due to be announced this month is key. 

Heslop comments: ‘Will she – and it will be a she – be a Left-winger or someone who can secure the centrist vote?’

A more socialist vice-president may push for the breaking-up of Amazon and Facebook to curb their power and the reversing of tax cuts for corporations and individuals. 

This would hit share prices, although any dip could be regarded as a buying opportunity.

It is also interesting to pinpoint shares that could be boosted by Biden’s clean energy policies.

Procter & Gamble, with its ambition to become carbon neutral, may be one beneficiary. 

This consumer goods bellwether has prospered during lockdown, as people have turned to Ariel and its other trusted brands. It’s a trend that has also favoured Kellogg’s, the cereal maker, but, confusingly, Kraft Heinz has stumbled.

The difficulty of assessing what lies ahead for companies and the economy may incline some investors to cash in their US gains. 

Yet even if you believe that tech share prices have lost touch with reality, it is clear lockdown has speeded the adoption of technology.

Ben Yearsley of Shore Financial Planning says: ‘Ask yourself if you think that in ten years time we’ll be using more tech than we do today. 

‘If the answer is yes, then you need some tech in your portfolio and the companies that lead the field are in the US and China.’

If you choose to stay on board, you could even increase your exposure to technology via the Polar Technology investment trust. 

Or you could diversify into fast-developing US biotech via Biotech Growth, another investment trust.

If you have decided to take a bet on America, under either Trump or Biden, Interactive Investor’s best buy funds include Merian North American Equity which holds Microsoft, Procter & Gamble and Johnson & Johnson.

LF Miton US Opportunities is a more adventurous pick. It has a stake in soft-drinks maker Keurig Dr Pepper whose products will appeal to both Trump and Biden for they have something in common: neither likes alcohol.

Popular shares – Tui 

The collapse in Tui’s share price as the Covid-19 pandemic struck was one of the most dramatic on the stock market – falling from 967p to 280p in just over a month.

It is axing 8,000 jobs globally and cancelling more holidays in response to the UK’s reinstatement of quarantine for tourists returning from various parts of the Continent – leaving shares at 322.5p last night.

On Thursday it will provide an update to the market on the period of trading since lockdown measures were lifted across Europe.

It will give the first signs of how the uncertainty over travel restrictions are affecting bookings, and whether customers have any confidence left in heading abroad.

Investors will also be looking at how much cash the company has. It said it could burn up to £540million every month – putting it on course to run out in just a few months.

It agreed a €1.8billion loan from the German state bank KfW, received compensation from Boeing over delayed Max jets and on Monday announced it had sold and leased back five aircraft for £171million.

Staff will also be keen to find out where the 8,000 job cuts will fall.

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Asos asks brands to reveal supply chains in wake of sweatshop scandal

Asos calls for clothing brands to reveal their supply chains in wake of Boohoo sweatshop scandal

Asos has demanded greater transparency from brands which want to sell their clothes on its site, following an industry-wide scandal surrounding factory working conditions.

The fast-fashion retailer is urging third-party brands to sign the Transparency Pledge – launched in 2016 by nine charities, including Human Rights Watch – which will require them to publicly reveal their manufacturing supply chains.

Rival Boohoo was accused of modern slavery, paying staff below the minimum wage and forcing them to work in unsafe conditions in a factory in Leicester.

ASOS is urging  brands to sign the Transparency Pledge which will require them to publicly reveal their manufacturing supply chains

Boohoo said it was not aware it was using the facility, and denied any wrongdoing.

Asos itself had already signed the pledge, as have River Island, Next and New Look. 

Along with other retailers, it dropped Boohoo lines – which also include Pretty Little Thing and Nasty Gal – from their sites in the wake of the scandal.

It will now ask brands to ensure they have ‘visibility’ over all parts of their supply chain, and that they can prove this to Asos. 

Asos has already ended contracts with a number of suppliers after unearthing issues with their supply chain.

The Transparency Pledge was launched in 2016 by nine charities, including Human Rights Watch.

MAGGIE PAGANO: Dishi Rishi’s furlough dilemma

Rishi Sunak has that rare quality among politicians of sounding as though he means what he says.

Using the jargon, he comes across as authentic and his enthusiasm makes him immensely likable.

Even his nickname, Dishi Rishi, is complimentary rather than derogatory. Again, rare for a politician.

Tough call: Chancellor Rishi Sunak admits there is hardship ahead for many people when the furlough scheme is unwound

So when the Chancellor said yesterday that taking the decision to wind down the furlough scheme at the end of October was ‘one of the most difficult decisions I’ve had to make in this job’, you believed him.

He’s known to be a bit of a geek, has a ‘mind that works in Excel’, according to one City friend, and sits up late at night scrutinising his screens. 

You can easily imagine he will have agonised over the numbers, and fretted over whether he should end the scheme.

Nor is the Chancellor pretending that bringing well over 9m people off life support is going to be easy. 

He admits there is hardship ahead for many people when the scheme is unwound but as he argues, it is neither fair to keep people hanging or pretend that many will not lose their jobs. Or spend even more billions of taxpayers’ money.

Sunak might well have said: ‘ Now is the winter of our discontent.’ But is he right to end the scheme with a bang in October? 

Will the hit not be too heavy a burden, falling as it will on the poorer workers who have no savings? 

Although Sunak also said that most other countries are also coming off their versions of furlough, not all of them are. Indeed, France, Germany, Japan, Canada and Australia are looking to continue schemes into the new year.

It’s a huge bet for him to take. However you look at the months ahead, they will be bloody. Around 130,000 jobs have already been lost that we know about, and probably thousands more have gone from SMEs below the radar. 

And the danger is there will be sharp-elbowed finance directors who will seize this opportunity to cut costs and jobs.

Yet there are some scraps of hope, which is perhaps what Sunak is banking on. First, the Bank of England has downgraded its forecast for unemployment to 7.5 per cent from 9 per cent in May when we were still in deep lockdown. 

That’s still 1.2m unemployed, and it’s bound to hurt school-leavers and the young first. 

Although the BofE is being criticised for being too optimistic, it is unlikely that its boffins are making such forecasts without serious evidence from the grassroots.

Second, the Government is working on several job schemes such as the Kickstart programme. 

The aim is to offer companies grants to take on 300,000 youngsters on Universal Credit. In theory, it’s a great idea and one can only pray it does not get bogged down in bureaucracy.

Finally, relations between the Government and the unions look to be relatively healthy. 

Frances O’Grady, General Secretary of the TUC, was one of the first to congratulate Sunak on March 20 when he announced the massive £350billion rescue bazooka, tweeting he had shown ‘real leadership’.

Keeping those good relations between bosses, unions and the Government going will be vital this autumn. 

Hopefully, the old-fashioned bust-up which looks to be blowing up between BA and the unions over the airline’s 10,000 job losses is particular to the airline industry, which is known for its fractious relations. 

Working well together is going to be more essential than ever. A paper from Warwick Business School analysed the British Workplace Employment Relations Survey, which took place in 2004 and 2011, either side of the financial crash.

The research shows that companies with strong human resources and trade union relationships survived far better than those which did not. It sounds obvious, but it is not always easy to achieve in practice.

But as companies and unions discovered during the crash, there are always innovative solutions to be found – whether it’s flexitime or part-time working if there are proper discussions. Meeting jaw to jaw is better than war.

Saving jobs is important. Helping to create new ones is even more so. Arguably, this is Sunak’s biggest challenge. 

His Future Fund was an instant hit, helping 320 early-stage, high-growth firms which have so far benefited from £320million of support.

Still more needs to be done. For starters, those who do have money to spare should be encouraged to invest in start-ups and SMEs with more generous tax incentives. 

Taxes paid on equity should also be reduced to help companies convert debt to equity.

The Chancellor has had a great honeymoon. Now comes the hard bit if he wants to avoid putting the country back onto life support. No pressure, then.

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Betting giants Flutter, Bet 365 and William Hill in tax haven row

Betting giants caught in tax haven row after being accused of fuelling gambling addiction

Britain’s biggest gambling firms have dozens of offshoots in tax havens, a Mail audit has found.

Paddypower’s owner Flutter, Bet 365 and William Hill all list subsidiaries offshore in locations such as Guernsey, Gibraltar and the Isle of Man in their annual accounts.

The complex corporate structures have raised concerns that the taxman could be losing out. 

Tax havens: Paddypower’s owner Flutter, Bet 365 and William Hill all list subsidiaries offshore in locations such as Guernsey, Gibraltar and the Isle of Man in their annual accounts

This week, a report by public policy think-tank, the Social Market Foundation, said most online companies operating in the UK are headquartered in tax havens, and claimed some do not pay corporation tax in full.

In the last two years Bet 365 paid an effective tax rate of 12.7 per cent on profits of £1.4billion.

The rate of corporation tax in the UK is 19 per cent. In its accounts, the online group said the rate was lower because of the ‘difference in tax rate of overseas subsidiaries’.

Four of the firm’s licences to operate in the UK are registered in Gibraltar or Malta, where the effective rate of corporation tax is 10 per cent and 5 per cent respectively.

William Hill, which has six subsidiaries in Gibraltar, said it expected to pay around 12 per cent in corporation tax on its profits in 2020. 

Winnings: Bet365 founder Denise Coates took home £323m in pay and dividends last year

Winnings: Bet365 founder Denise Coates took home £323m in pay and dividends last year 

Ladbrokes Coral is not required to disclose its tax rate, but one of its two licenses to operate in the UK is registered in Gibraltar.

Its parent GVC paid an effective rate of 3 per cent on profits of £81.5million between 2012 and 2015. 

Despite growing into a £4.2billion company, it has booked losses in the last four years.

In 2019 Paddypower and Betfair’s owner Flutter, which was based in Ireland ahead of its merger with the Stars Group, paid 15.9 per cent in tax. 

There is no allegation that the firms have broken the law, but the opaque web of companies they deploy makes it almost impossible to check if firms are paying the correct amount.

Matt Zarb-Cousin, director of campaign group Clean Up Gambling, said: ‘This sector is extracting massive profits from Britain while leaving the rest of the country to pick up the bill for the damage.’

Last year the Mail revealed that 32 Red, which is based in Gibraltar, paid just £812,000 in corporation tax in the ten years to 2016 – an effective tax rate of 3 per cent.

To counter the bookmakers’ tactics, the Government brought in remote gaming duty in 2014 – now levied at 21 per cent on revenue.

32 Red’s owner gambling operator Kindred said: ‘Kindred Group and all our brands – including 32Red – pays all taxes required in every market we operate including the UK.’

William Hill said any claim it is avoiding tax is ‘ inaccurate and highly misleading’.

Bet365 said it is a global business headquartered in the UK. It added that its majority shareholders and Bet365 were together the country’s largest tax payers and contributed £446million in tax last year.

A GVC spokesman said: ‘GVC is a global business. Nevertheless, group companies paid more than £2.5billion of UK taxes from 2015 – 2019 , making it one of the top 20 largest taxpayers in the country.’

Flutter declined to comment.

Lockdown savers pile £8bn into Hargreaves Lansdown

Lockdown savers pile £8bn into Hargreaves Lansdown: Broker’s billionaire founders to receive £82m in dividends

Hargreaves Lansdown was boosted by an influx of customers during lockdown, as thousands of Britons sat down to order their finances and invest.

The Bristol-based broker saw savers pile £7.7billion more than they withdrew into stocks and funds through its platform in the 12 months to June 30, and its profit before tax shot up by 24 per cent to £378.3million.

The billionaire founders of Hargreaves will receive £82million in dividends. 

Hargreaves Lansdown saw savers pile £7.7bn more than they withdrew into stocks and funds in the 12 months to June 30, and its profit before tax shot up by 24 per cent to £378.3m

Peter Hargreaves and Stephen Lansdown are to pocket £63.4million and £18.6million respectively from the company they founded in a bedroom in 1981. The pair own a combined 31.5 per cent of shares. 

Their latest bonanza comes after Hargreaves hiked its payout by almost a third to 54.9p a share.

The strong performance comes as the firm attempts to put its involvement in the Neil Woodford debacle behind it.

The firm is still facing legal action from swathes of customers who objected to its promotion of the Woodford Equity Income fund, even when it was facing severe issues threatening its stability.

But many savers appear to have forgiven Hargreaves, as 188,000 new customers joined over the year to take its clients to 1.4million.

Chris Hill, chief executive, said: ‘The impacts of Covid are really significant. But people are thinking more about saving for the long term.’

Asset manager Standard Life Aberdeen managed to stem its outflows, pulling £100million more than it lost into its funds over the first half of the year. 

This was a marked improvement on the £15.9billion of outflows it experienced over the same period a year earlier.

MARKET REPORT: Rightmove shares leap as housing revival starts

MARKET REPORT: Rightmove shares leap as housing revival starts with property search site notching up 65 days of record traffic

After months cooped up at home during lockdown, many Britons are reappraising their living arrangements.

So many, in fact, that property search site Rightmove notched up 65 days of record traffic since the housing market came out of hibernation on May 13.

Rightmove’s turnover and profit, predictably, sank between January and June when compared with 2019. Revenues fell by more than a third to £95million, while profits dived from £108million to £62million over the six-month period.

Housing revival: Property search site Rightmove notched up 65 days of record traffic since the housing market came out of hibernation on May 13

But shares in the group leapt 9.1 per cent, or 52.8p, to 630.6p after it said membership numbers – of estate agents who pay to show properties on the site – have only fallen by 3.3 per cent to 19,158.

It offered a 75 per cent discount to customers between April and June and extended this until the end of September – which should ensure it manages to keep hold of agencies if the recent ‘mini boom’ in house prices continues.

According to data from Halifax, prices rose 1.6 per cent in July as the market reacted to news of the Chancellor’s stamp duty holiday.

A surge from pent-up demand was expected after the property market ground to a halt for several months – and there has been a noticeable increase in people searching for bigger houses in more rural areas as people ‘reassess their priorities’.

Stock Watch -Codemasters

Video game developer Codemasters Group accelerated following the release of Fast & Furious Crossroads.

Slightly Mad Studios, which AIM-listed Codemasters bought last year, created the game, the latest in the phenomenally successful racing franchise that stars Vin Diesel and Michelle Rodriguez.

It was originally going to be released alongside the film of the same name, but this has been pushed back to next year. 

Shares rose 1.2 per cent, or 4.5p, to 377.7p.

Chief executive Peter Brooks-Johnson is trying to stay pragmatic, and yesterday said it is ‘hard to predict how sustained the increase in activity will be’ over the rest of this year.

Rightmove’s surge almost sent it to the top of the FTSE 100 leaderboard – but it was beaten by Hikma Pharmaceuticals. 

Hikma has started making Gilead’s Covid-19 drug remdesivir under contract in Portugal to increase global supply. It’s one of just two medicines shown to help hospitalised patients in clinical trials.

Hikma also hiked its dividend by 14 per cent (to 12p per share) after first-half profits jumped 21 per cent to £209million. 

The news was music to the ears of dividend-deprived investors and put a rocket under Hikma’s stock, sending it soaring 10.9 per cent, or 236p, to 2393p.

Rightmove and Hikma’s gains weren’t seen across the wider stock market though with the FTSE 100 climbing just 0.1 per cent, or 5.24 points, to 6032.18, while the FTSE 250 finished up 0.8 per cent, or 143.55 points, at 17622.93.

The Footsie was nudged into the black by US employment figures that showed almost 1.8m people were added to payrolls in July – a much bigger rise than economists had been expecting.

This meant the unemployment figure fell from 11.1 per cent to 10.2 per centWall Street rose on the figures, with both the Dow Jones and Nasdaq climbing in early trading. 

Traders across the world were also encouraged by figures released earlier in the day that suggested a rebound might be on the way for the global economy. 

German and French manufacturers both reported seeing a surge in demand – with industrial production in the former rising by almost 9 per cent in June – and that exports were starting to pick up.

And China released buoyant trade numbers showing exports had risen sharply in July – by 7.2 per cent compared with the same month of last year.

Rolls-Royce tipped into the red following reports that activist investor Value Act has sold out of its entire stake in the struggling engineering group.

The San Francisco-based group is thought to be annoyed by serial restructurings at the firm since it took a holding in 2015 – and its exit comes shortly before Rolls is expected to raise around £1.5billionn by selling new shares.

Footsie-listed Rolls fell 0.2 per cent, or 0.5p, to 252.6p.