Boris Johnson pleads with Britons NOT to shun A&E saying hospitals are safe

Boris Johnson has announced £300million of extra funding for NHS hospitals to Covid-proof their facilities and get services up and running in time for winter.

The Prime Minister said it is essential that anyone who needs emergency treatment should go to hospital and they can be confident they would not catch coronavirus.

‘Thanks to the hard work and tireless efforts of NHS staff throughout the pandemic, our A&Es have remained open for the public,’ he said.

‘It’s vital that those who need emergency treatment this winter access it, and for those who remain concerned about visiting hospitals, let me assure you that the NHS has measures in place to keep people safe.’

His comments come after it was revealed that three in 10 adults would not feel comfortable attending A&E for urgent care if they needed it.

The survey, done by the Office for National Statistics, found that a fifth of respondents (21 per cent) would feel uncomfortable attending. 

Another eight per cent admitted they would be ‘very uncomfortable’, according to the results of the poll. 

And 14 per cent said they wouldn’t feel comfortable seeing any healthcare professional in person. 

Boris Johnson has urged Brits not to shun A&E as he announced a £300million upgrade of hospital facilities 

The Prime Minister visits  Hereford County Hospital today as he announces £300m will go towards hospitals to Covid-proof their facilities

The Prime Minister visits  Hereford County Hospital today as he announces £300m will go towards hospitals to Covid-proof their facilities

Mr Johnson speaks to staff at Hereford County Hospital today as he announces the new hospital funding

Mr Johnson speaks to staff at Hereford County Hospital today as he announces the new hospital funding

Which 10 NHS trusts will get the most money? 

1.) Southampton NHS Foundation Trust – £9million

2.) University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust – £6,997,000 

3.) Barts Health NHS Trust – £6,410,000

4.) Epsom And St Helier University Hospitals NHS Trust – £6,100,000

5.) Lancashire Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust – £6,054,000

6.) Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust – £5,389,000

7.) Bradford Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust – £4,888,000

8.) Manchester University NHS Foundation Trust – £4,861,000

9.) Mid And South Essex NHS Foundation Trust – £4,838,000

10.) Royal Berkshire NHS Foundation Trust – £4,520,000

Mr Johnson said the additional £300million would enable hospitals to maintain essential services and reduce the risk of Covid-19 infection during the coming months.

The funding comes from a £1.5billion capital building allocation for the NHS set out by Mr Johnson in June. 

Trusts across the Midlands will see a whopping £50million in funding while ones across the North East and Yorkshire will see £53million. 

The single trust to receive the most money is the University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust with a staggering £9million. 

Hospitals could use the new funding to expand waiting areas in A&Es and increase the number of treatment cubicles available which would help to boost capacity and reduce overcrowding. 

The reduction in overcrowding would then help infection control measures. 

Hospitals could also increase the amount of same day emergency care and improve patient flow to help the NHS respond to winter pressures and the risks of a second wave.  

Some 117 trusts will benefit from the additional funding, including: Southampton which will see £9million in funding, University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust which will get £7million and Barts Health NHS Trust which will get £6.4million. 

Mother-of-three, 36, is diagnosed with incurable cancer after she held off going to the doctor for a stomach ache during lockdown because she ‘didn’t want to waste their time’ 

Johanna William, 36, from Burton, Staffordshire, suffered abdomen pains in April but did not see her GP because she knew the NHS was ‘overwhelmed’ by the coronavirus and ‘didn’t want to waste their time’.

A CT scan in early June confirmed the chef had two tumours in her adrenal gland spreading to her liver, kidney and spleen – stage four incurable cancer. 

Ms William said: ‘I didn’t want to waste the doctors’ time for a tummy ache, the NHS had so much going on.

‘In June the pain got so bad I went to the hospital. Originally they thought they were two cysts but after the radiologists had a look at them they confirmed they were two tumours.

‘I had to wait a week to hear back from the oncology specialist- it was a very long week.

‘I was in shock, it never crossed my mind, a stomach ache could have been cancer. I was thinking I might have eaten the wrong thing or maybe I have an intolerance to dairy or something like that.’

Officials said the projects would all be completed by the start of 2021 so hospitals would benefit from the upgrades during the peak months of winter. 

Mr Johnson said: ‘These upgrades will help our fantastic NHS prepare for the winter months, helping them to deliver essential services and reduce the risk of coronavirus infections.’ 

It comes after new government figures revealed that lockdown killed two people for every three that died of coronavirus.   

It is thought that as many as 16,000 people died because they didn’t get medical care between March 23 and May 1. 

In the same period, 25,000 Britons died of the virus. 

The new figures were presented to the Government’s Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (Sage) in the middle of July.

They were calculated by the Department of Health, the Office for National Statistics (ONS), the Government Actuary’s Department and the Home Office. 

The 16,000 people who died included 6,000 who didn’t go to A&E during lockdown because they feared catching the virus. 

Another 10,000 people are thought to have died in care homes after early discharge from hospital and a lack of access to care. 

A further 26,000 people could die by next month because of the restrictions, while in total 81,500 people could lose their lives in the next 50 years because of the virus.

This would be through waiting longer for non-urgent care and due to the impact of the recession caused by the pandemic.

It comes after a district nurse warned that people suffering from treatable cancers will end up dying because of Government ‘scaremongering’ and an over-cautious reduction of NHS services. 

In more bad news, the next five years could see 1,400 people die because they were diagnosed with cancer too late. 

An earlier report by the same team suggested deaths caused by delayed care amid the virus they could be as high as 185,000.  

Number of NHS patients admitted for routine ops drops 82 per cent in a year: The number of patients admitted plummeted to 54,550 in May this year, the lowest ever one record and a drop from 295,881 in May 2019

Number of NHS patients admitted for routine ops drops 82 per cent in a year: The number of patients admitted plummeted to 54,550 in May this year, the lowest ever one record and a drop from 295,881 in May 2019

NHS figures show that 106,535 urgent cancer referrals were made by GPs in England in May 2020, 47 per cent down from 200,599 in May 2019

NHS figures show that 106,535 urgent cancer referrals were made by GPs in England in May 2020, 47 per cent down from 200,599 in May 2019

The Government’s report, published in April but largely overlooked until now, found the great majority of the deaths would be attributed to an extended wait for treatment in the longer term.

But up to 25,000 deaths would have come in the first six months because of healthcare delays, according to experts at the Department of Health and Social Care, Office for National Statistics, Government Actuary’s Department and the Home Office. 

5,000 HEART ATTACK SUFFERERS ‘MISSED OUT ON LIFE-SAVING CARE BECAUSE OF COVID-19’

Five-thousands heart attack sufferers in England missed out on life-saving hospital treatment due to the Covid-19 pandemic, a study claimed just weeks ago.

Researchers analysed NHS hospital data to show that around the peak of the crisis, in late March, admissions were 35 per cent lower than usual.

Up to a quarter of people who suffered the most severe heart attack — a complete blockage of an artery — did not seek help, figures suggest.

Admissions are now picking back up again because the coronavirus is fizzling out, according to researchers at the University of Oxford.

But patient confidence is nowhere near pre-Covid levels as Brits still fear catching the coronavirus if they go to hospital.

Experts warned the risk of death from delaying heart attack treatment is higher than picking up Covid-19 at hospital.

The figures equate to nearly one million years of life lost unnecessarily, in the worst-case scenario outlined in the report.

And the University of Oxford discovered just weeks ago that 5,000 fewer heart attack patients had attended hospital between March and May. 

The report said: ‘Suspending “non-urgent” care is expected to have a short-term health impact in itself, since patients not receiving treatment will have reduced quality of life whilst not receiving these healthcare services. 

‘In the longer term their condition is likely to deteriorate without treatment and some could die earlier than otherwise. 

‘Cutting screening, prevention services and primary care services will mean that life-threatening diseases will go undetected and hence untreated, resulting in more avoidable deaths.’

It added that the longer services are de-prioritised, the bigger the impact it will have on the nation’s health. 

The estimates were based on 75 per cent of elective care being cancelled over six months without a swift return to normality. 

In more positive news, it is estimated 2,500 deaths could have been prevented because of the lockdown. 

While people were restricted, they led healthier lifestyles, while there were fewer infectious diseases in children, a fall in air pollution and a decrease in road deaths 

The new report is the latest to highlight the impact the lockdown has had on Britons, amid suggestions of another national lockdown in the winter during a potential second wave.  

Medical organisations have consistently warned of the long term dangers of lockdown and of focusing so much of the NHS on coronavirus. 

Professor Neil Mortensen, the president of the Royal College of Surgeons of England, warned that the health service ‘must never again be a coronavirus-only service’.

He told the Telegraph: ‘We have to deal first with the most clinically urgent patients, and then as soon as possible with those who have been waiting the longest. 

‘The period through August and September is vitally important in making progress before routine winter pressures emerge. 

The coronavirus reproduction rate could now be as high as one right across the UK after rising slightly in the last week, the Government’s scientific advisers warned today amid fears the virus is making a resurgence.

SAGE estimates the R value – the average number of people each Covid-19 patient infects – is now between 0.8 and 1.0, up from last week’s prediction that it was hovering around 0.8 and 0.9. Experts say the R needs to stay below one or Governments risk losing control of the epidemic and the virus could spiral back out of control.

England as a whole has remained the same at 0.8 to 1.0, but the R rose in Scotland (0.6 and 1.0), Wales (0.7 and 1.0), Northern Ireland (0.8 and 1.8), London (0.8 and 1.1), the North East and Yorkshire (0.8 and 1.0), and in the Midlands (0.8 and 1.0). The East of England is the only region in the entire UK where scientists can say with certainty that the R is below one.

SAGE said it was now ‘starting to see early indications that’ coronavirus was on the rise, which has fuelled fears that a second wave of the virus is making its way through the country.  

But it warned that when transmission is as low as it currently is in the UK – less than 1,000 people are being diagnosed every day – the R is more volatile. This means it can be skewed upwards by local clusters of infections, which has been seen in Aberdeen in Scotland and in swathes of the North West of England.

NHS MUST NOT SHUT DOWN NORMAL CARE THIS WINTER, TOP MEDICS SAY

Tens of thousands of patients may die if the NHS shuts down normal care during a second coronavirus wave, leading medics warned today.

Health service bosses are being urged not to leave non-virus patients ‘stranded and in pain’ once again after cancelling millions of appointments during the first epidemic.

In early March the NHS told hospitals to scrap as many operations as possible and turf out patients on their wards to make way for an influx of Covid-19 patients. 

The move was successful and hospitals were not overwhelmed by the effects of the virus. But cancer charities fear tens of thousands more patients will die in the next year because they had their tumours diagnosed too late or missed completely.

Official figures show that 12,000 more people than average died in England during lockdown from illnesses unrelated to Covid, including heart attacks and strokes.  

Professor Neil Mortensen, president of the Royal College of Surgeons of England, said the NHS ‘must never again be a Covid-only service’.

He told the Guardian: ‘There is a duty to the thousands of patients waiting in need and in pain to make sure they can be treated.’

Dr Chaand Nagpaul, chair of council at the British Medical Association (BMA), warned patients who need urgent care should never be left ‘stranded’ again.

Despite the rise, separate Government data today suggested cases could actually be on their way down again after weeks of being on the up. The Office for National Statistics (ONS), which tracks the size of the outbreak by swabbing thousands of people, now believes there are 3,700 people in England getting infected with Covid-19 each day.

It is 12 per cent down on the 4,200 made in the government-run agency’s estimate last week, when they warned there was ‘enough evidence’ to prove cases were spiralling. The spike in cases prompted Boris Johnson to declare he was ‘squeezing the brake pedal’ on easing the coronavirus lockdown.

The ONS estimated 28,300 people in England had the coronavirus between July 27 and August 2 – the equivalent of one in 1,900 people. In comparison, last week’s rate was one in 1,500.

There has been some confusion about whether the virus is actually resurging, with prominent scientists warning that data was merely reflecting an increase in testing in areas that have been hit by flare-ups of the disease.   

Boris Johnson’s £300million pledge comes on top of a £3billion cash injection for the NHS in England – with extra funding also for Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland – announced last month to help it to cope with the expected winter pressures.

That funding has been earmarked to enable the NHS to continue to use the extra hospital capacity acquired from the independent sector, maintain Nightingale hospitals until the end of March and expand its flu vaccination programme. 

Dr Nick Scriven, immediate past president of the Society for Acute Medicine, said while any additional funding was helpful, there were limits to what it could achieve.

‘The money is welcome but how do we think we can actually implement what would be building works in existing units whilst remaining safe and efficient – all before any rise in either Covid or non-Covid patients which, if like last winter, may start before the end of October?’ he said. 

The move comes amid reports that scientists at Public Health England (PHE) have warned secondary school pupils are as likely to transmit coronavirus as easily as adults.

Education Secretary Gavin Williamson has said PHE findings due to be published later this year showed there was little risk from the Government’s plans to reopen schools in England in September. 

A PHE spokesperson said: ‘PHE analysis of recorded cases and outbreaks in educational settings in England is currently undergoing pre-publication verification and review, and will be published in due course.

‘It appears to show that SARS-CoV-2 infections and outbreaks were uncommon in educational settings during the first month after the easing of national lockdown in England.’

‘Additionally, a nationwide surveillance programme examining antibody prevalence in schoolchildren (sKIDs), is being analysed and should be published in the coming weeks. These publications combined will give the most complete picture of the landscape of Covid-19 in educational settings that we have seen to date.’

WHERE IS THE EXTRA £300MILLION GOING?  

Midlands – £50,067,000

Birmingham Women’s And Children’s NHS Foundation Trust – £850,000

George Eliot Hospital NHS Trust – £3,000,000

Kettering General Hospital NHS Foundation Trust – £1,000,000

Northampton General Hospital NHS Trust – £2,900,000

Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust – £2,000,000

Sandwell And West Birmingham Hospitals NHS Trust – £4,000,000

Sherwood Forest Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust – £2,000,000

Shrewsbury And Telford Hospital NHS Trust – £2,000,000

South Warwickshire NHS Foundation Trust – £2,000,000

The Dudley Group NHS Foundation Trust – £3,000,000

The Royal Wolverhampton NHS Trust – £1,720,000

United Lincolnshire Hospitals NHS Trust – £2,000,000

University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust – £6,997,000

University Hospitals Of Derby And Burton NHS Foundation Trust – £4,000,000

University Hospitals Of Leicester NHS Trust – £2,000,000

University Hospitals Of North Midlands NHS Trust – £4,300,000

Walsall Healthcare NHS Trust – £4,100,000

Wye Valley NHS Trust – £2,000,000

Chesterfield Royal Hospital NHS Foundation Trust – £200,000

 

North East And Yorkshire – £53,760,000

Airedale NHS Foundation Trust – £224,000

Barnsley Hospital NHS Foundation Trust – £3,971,000

Bradford Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust – £4,888,000

Calderdale And Huddersfield NHS Foundation Trust – £2,252,000

County Durham And Darlington NHS Foundation Trust – £3,760,000

Doncaster And Bassetlaw Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust – £1,850,000

Gateshead Health NHS Foundation Trust – £1,435,000

Harrogate And District NHS Foundation Trust – £527,000

Hull University Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust – £4,297,000

Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust – £5,389,000

Mid Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust – £2,607,000

North Cumbria Integrated Care NHS Foundation Trust – £4,000,000

North Tees And Hartlepool NHS Foundation Trust – £3,000,000

Northumbria Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust – £1,000,000

Sheffield Children’s NHS Foundation Trust – £2,049,000

Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust – £1,700,000

South Tees Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust – £3,180,000

South Tyneside And Sunderland NHS Foundation Trust – £3,745,000

The Newcastle Upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust – £1,000,000

The Rotherham NHS Foundation Trust – £1,950,000

York Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust – £936,000

North West – £46,100,000

Alder Hey Children’s NHS Foundation Trust – £1,441,000

Blackpool Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust – £2,785,000

Bolton NHS Foundation Trust – £2,564,000

East Cheshire NHS Trust – £2,209,000

Greater Manchester Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust – £701,000

Lancashire Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust – £6,054,000

Liverpool University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust – £1,921,000

Manchester University NHS Foundation Trust – £4,861,000

Pennine Acute Hospitals NHS Trust – £1,921,000

Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust – £1,441,000

Southport And Ormskirk Hospital NHS Trust – £1,729,000

St Helens And Knowsley Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust – £3,842,000

 

Stockport NHS Foundation Trust – £3,611,000

Tameside And Glossop Integrated Care NHS Foundation Trust – £1,897,000

University Hospitals Of Morecambe Bay NHS Foundation Trust – £1,921,000

Warrington And Halton Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust – £4,322,000

Wirral University Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust – £1,441,000

Wrightington, Wigan And Leigh NHS Foundation Trust – £1,441,000

 

South East – £44,163,000

Brighton And Sussex University Hospitals NHS Trust – £3,700,000

Buckinghamshire Healthcare NHS Trust – £900,000

Dartford And Gravesham NHS Trust – £2,553,000

East Sussex Healthcare NHS Trust – £3,700,000

Frimley Health NHS Foundation Trust – £1,820,000

Hampshire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust – £1,505,000

Kent And Medway STP – £750,000

Kent Community Health NHS Foundation Trust – £1,500,000

Maidstone And Tunbridge Wells NHS Trust – £2,817,000

Medway NHS Foundation Trust – £857,000

Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust – £3,600,000

Royal Berkshire NHS Foundation Trust  – £4,520,000

Royal Surrey County Hospital NHS Foundation Trust – £500,000

Surrey And Sussex Healthcare NHS Trust – £2,200,000

Surrey Heartlands Health And Care Partnership – £541,000

University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust – £9,000,000

Western Sussex Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust – £3,700,000

South West – £27,400,000

Gloucestershire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust – £4,400,000

North Bristol NHS Trust – £1,900,000

Northern Devon Healthcare NHS Trust – £2,346,000

Poole Hospital NHS Foundation Trust – £1,759,000

Royal Cornwall Hospitals NHS Trust – £2,800,000

Royal United Hospitals Bath NHS Foundation Trust – £2,500,000

Salisbury NHS Foundation Trust – £2,000,000

Somerset Partnership NHS Foundation Trust – £1,245,000

The Royal Bournemouth And Christchurch Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust – £2,500,000

University Hospitals Plymouth NHS Trust – £4,000,000

University Hospitals Bristol And Weston NHS Foundation Trust – £1,200,000

Yeovil District Hospital NHS Foundation Trust – £750,000

London – £49,633,000

Barking, Havering And Redbridge University Hospitals NHS Trust – £4,100,000

Barts Health NHS Trust – £6,410,000

Chelsea And Westminster Hospital NHS Foundation Trust – £1,573,000

Croydon Health Services NHS Trust – £2,587,000

Epsom And St Helier University Hospitals NHS Trust – £6,100,000

Guy’s And St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust – £2,460,000

Homerton University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust – £2,700,000

Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust – £1,430,000

King’s College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust – £2,981,000

Kingston Hospital NHS Foundation Trust – £790,000

Lewisham And Greenwich NHS Trust – £1,500,000

London North West University Healthcare NHS Trust – £2,843,000

North Middlesex University Hospital NHS Trust – £4,400,000

Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust – £2,466,000

St George’s University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust – £2,521,000

The Hillingdon Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust – £4,103,000

University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust – £294,000

Whittington Health NHS Trust – £375,000

East – £28,800,000

Bedfordshire Hospital NHS Foundation Trust – £3,000,000

Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust – £875,000

East Suffolk And North Essex NHS Foundation Trust – £3,051,000

James Paget University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust – £2,200,000

Mid And South Essex NHS Foundation Trust – £4,838,000

Milton Keynes University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust – £1,578,000

Norfolk And Norwich University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust – £1,898,000

North West Anglia NHS Foundation Trust – £3,700,000

Queen Elizabeth Hospital Kings Lynn NHS Trust – £1,900,000

The Princess Alexandra Hospital NHS Trust – £400,000

West Hertfordshire Hospitals NHS Trust – £2,660,000

West Suffolk NHS Foundation Trust – £2,700,000

Total £299,723,000 

Patients will need to be seen by ‘social care navigators’ and ‘nurse practitioners’

The ‘non-doctor’ will see you now! Patients will need to be treated by ‘social care navigators’ and ‘nurse practitioners’ to clear the lockdown backlog, medical leader warns

  • Patients may have to get used to having appointments with physician associates
  • They do just two years’ medical training and care navigators can be receptionists
  • There are nearly four million people awaiting operations or treatment right now 

Patients  will need to be seen by non-doctors including ‘social care navigators’, ‘physician associates’ and ‘nurse practitioners’ to clear the lockdown backlog, a medical leader warns.

Professor Helen Stokes-Lampard predicted the waiting lists of the past five months will continue to rise unless the NHS radically alters how it delivers care.

The chairman of the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges said patients will need to get used to having appointments with physician associates, who do just two years’ medical training, and care navigators, who are often receptionists. Nurses will also have to take on doctors’ roles.

There are nearly four million people awaiting operations or treatment. Professor Stokes-Lampard said: ‘We have to do things differently. There are many other healthcare professionals who do an amazing job.

Professor Helen Stokes-Lampard predicted the waiting lists of the past five months will continue to rise unless the NHS radically alters how it delivers care. Pictured: Stock photo of a medical professional using a stethoscope

‘But people are suspicious and many times patients say to me, “are you fobbing me off doctor?”.

‘There’s a fear and paranoia that if people aren’t being seen by a doctor they are somehow getting something inferior. That’s absolutely not the case. These healthcare professionals are highly trained.

‘There are people like healthcare navigators who literally help you through the system. You’ve got people like physician assistants who are highly trained in certain elements in certain medical care. 

We’ve got advanced nurse practitioners who do a lot of urgent medical care.

‘There’s a whole myriad of different healthcare professionals who are confusing to people.

‘I would encourage patients to give it a go and keep an open mind.’

Professor Stokes-Lampard said a patient with a sprained knee who would have traditionally been seen by a GP could now be seen by experts such as paramedics, musculoskeletal practitioners and ‘social prescribers’ – non-medically trained staff who put patients in touch with charities, exercise clubs or other activities.

She also urged healthcare staff to be honest with patients about the sheer size of the NHS waiting list and how long they were going to have to wait before being seen.

The Academy of Medical Royal Colleges is one of the most influential healthcare bodies in the country.

Professor Stokes-Lampard, who practises as a GP in Lichfield in Staffordshire, became chairman of the Academy last month after three years at the Royal College of GPs.

Peter Kay pens new Car Share sketch which sees John break down in tears during brain cancer scare

Peter Kay has penned a new emotional Car Share sketch for a tribute book about the National Health Service.  

The comedian, 47, wrote about his character John’s cancer scare, with the supermarket assistant manager telling cashier Kayleigh about having a brain scan. 

The moving story is published in book Dear NHS: 100 Stories to Say Thank You, which features 100 tales by celebs in tribute to the NHS.

Touching: Peter Kay has penned a new Car Share sketch which sees his character John telling Kayleigh about a brain cancer scare for an NHS tribute book (pictured the comedian and Sian Gibson in the popular BBC show)

The sketch begins with Peter’s character John explaining how he’s organising his dad’s end-of-life care to Kayleigh.

He tells her: ‘I went for a brain scan once… it was years ago, I kept getting these really bad headaches.

‘My GP said it was sinuses, but being a proper hypochondriac, I thought: “b*****ks, what does he know?” So I booked in for a brain scan.’

John reveals that he was left in tears during the MRI when, after asking the nurse to play Simon & Garfunkel, the first track which came on was The Sound Of Silence.  

Hit show: Car Share finished in 2018 but did return for a one-off audio special in April amid the coronavirus pandemic (Peter is pictured in 2017)

Hit show: Car Share finished in 2018 but did return for a one-off audio special in April amid the coronavirus pandemic (Peter is pictured in 2017)

‘It got worse – in the third verse the lyrics are “silence like a cancer grows”. I was in tears. I was ashen when I came out,’ says John.

Thankfully, the sketch ends on a positive note, with John explaining that nothing was found by the doctors, and that his GP had been right: his sinuses were the issue. 

Peter’s new Car Share sketch is included in Dear NHS: 100 Stories to Say Thank You, which was curated and edited by Adam Kay.

As well as the comedian, 100 other inspirational people came together to share their personal stories about how the NHS has supported them and changed their lives. 

End of an era: The final episode saw John and Kayleigh holding hands as they sat on a bus and laughing after one of their rows ended in his car being towed, hinting they were finally going to end up a couple

End of an era: The final episode saw John and Kayleigh holding hands as they sat on a bus and laughing after one of their rows ended in his car being towed, hinting they were finally going to end up a couple

As a collection the deeply moving, hilarious and hopeful become a love letter to the NHS and the 1.4 million people who go above and beyond every single day.

Other famous faces who contributed to the book include Paul McCartney, Emilia Clarke, Stephen Fry, Dawn French, Sir Trevor McDonald and Graham Norton.

Stories from Ricky Gervais, Sir David Jason, Dame Emma Thompson, Joanna Lumley, Miranda Hart, Dermot O’Leary, Jamie Oliver and Ed Sheeran are also included. 

A minimum of £3.09 from the sale of each book will be paid to NHS Charities Together and £0.16 will be paid to The Lullaby Trust. 

Popular: Avid fans even starting a petition for a third series of Car Share after it ended, but have had no luck. Peter did release an audio special in April as well as the new sketch in the NHS tribute book (the comedian is pictured as character John alongside Kayleigh in the show)

Popular: Avid fans even starting a petition for a third series of Car Share after it ended, but have had no luck. Peter did release an audio special in April as well as the new sketch in the NHS tribute book (the comedian is pictured as character John alongside Kayleigh in the show)

Peter Kay’s Car Share series finished back in May 2018, but did return for a special one-off episode to cheer fans up amid the coronavirus pandemic.

The comedian revealed he had recorded an audio episode of the sitcom, which dropped on Friday, April 10.

Peter said: ‘It’s a horrific situation right now we’re all going through and like so many people I feel compelled to try to do something positive in an attempt to cheer people up in some way.    

‘Sian Gibson, Paul Coleman and myself got together via t’internet and wrote a new short episode of Car Share. It all happened very quickly – in fact, it didn’t exist a week ago.

Tweet: Car Share last aired in May 2018 and told the story of supermarket assistant manager John Redmond and promotions rep Kayleigh Kitson during their time in a company car sharing scheme

Tweet: Car Share last aired in May 2018 and told the story of supermarket assistant manager John Redmond and promotions rep Kayleigh Kitson during their time in a company car sharing scheme

‘Obviously we weren’t able to film anything because of the lockdown but I hope people will use their imagination and enjoy listening.’ 

Car Share last aired in May 2018 and told the story of supermarket assistant manager John Redmond and promotions rep Kayleigh Kitson during their time in a company car sharing scheme.

The final episode of the very popular series saw John and Kayleigh, played by Sian Gibson, finally getting together and holding hands on the bus.

The co-workers had to take the bus home after they had a row where the door of his red Fiat 500 car was knocked off.

Rare appearance: Peter has not been seen very often in the past two years and was recently forced to announce his Dance For Life tour had been cancelled due to the Covid-19 outbreak (pictured in 2010)

Rare appearance: Peter has not been seen very often in the past two years and was recently forced to announce his Dance For Life tour had been cancelled due to the Covid-19 outbreak (pictured in 2010)

The last scenes saw John and Kayleigh listening to music together on a bus after his car got towed. Kayleigh then rested her head on John’s shoulder, causing fans to believe that the pair were finally going to make a go of it romantically.

Avid followers of the show were gutted that the second series had come to an end, with some even starting a petition for a third series.

However, despite fans calling for more on Twitter, the comedian confirmed the Bank Holiday special was the ‘definite end’, as he feels the show went ‘out on a high’.

A huge 6.4million tuned in to watch the last episode – causing both fans and BBC bosses to beg the Manchester native for another series. 

Yet, Peter reportedly confirmed at the time that he will not be taking the show further in the future, as he feels it was left in a good place.

What a show: The sitcom surrounded two work colleagues who share a ride to work with the final episode having a huge 6.4million tune in to watch

What a show: The sitcom surrounded two work colleagues who share a ride to work with the final episode having a huge 6.4million tune in to watch

A source told The Sun: ‘He believes great sitcoms should go out on a high like Fawlty Towers. So sadly that’s definitely the end, however much fans might beg for more.’  

Since the show ended Peter has rarely been seen in public and made his first TV appearance in two years during BBC One’s The Big Night In in April 2020, which fundraised during the coronavirus pandemic.     

Fans were especially pleased as Peter had been forced to cancelled his Dance For Life tour due to the Covid-19 outbreak.

The comedian broke the news in a statement, less than a month after confirming he would be returning to the stage with his epic dance-a-thon to raise money for Cancer Research UK. 

Peter’s Dance For Life Tour would have been his long-awaited return to the spotlight after cancelling all of his work commitments in 2017 due to ‘unforeseen family circumstances.’ 

He said: ‘Obviously this is disappointing news but well and truly justified given the circumstances. We’ll get through this, together and then we’ll all have a great big dance for life. Stay safe and look after yourselves and the people around you.’

A further statement from Peter said: ‘Due to the ongoing coronavirus outbreak and following Government advice, it is with deep regret that the forthcoming Peter Kay’s Dance For Life shows are being postponed.

‘We are looking to schedule the shows so please hold onto your tickets as they will be valid for the new dates. We apologise for any inconvenience this may cause but the safety of the public is paramount.’

Bad news: Peter announced his tour had been cancelled in a statement to fans just weeks after first revealing his comeback

Bad news: Peter announced his tour had been cancelled in a statement to fans just weeks after first revealing his comeback

Peter Kay pens new Car Share sketch which sees John break down in tears during brain cancer scare

Peter Kay has penned a new emotional Car Share sketch for a tribute book about the National Health Service.  

The comedian, 47, wrote about his character John’s cancer scare, with the supermarket assistant manager telling cashier Kayleigh about having a brain scan. 

The moving story is published in book Dear NHS: 100 Stories to Say Thank You, which features 100 tales by celebs in tribute to the NHS.

Touching: Peter Kay has penned a new Car Share sketch which sees his character John telling Kayleigh about a brain cancer scare for an NHS tribute book (pictured the comedian and Sian Gibson in the popular BBC show)

The sketch begins with Peter’s character John explaining how he’s organising his dad’s end-of-life care to Kayleigh.

He tells her: ‘I went for a brain scan once… it was years ago, I kept getting these really bad headaches.

‘My GP said it was sinuses, but being a proper hypochondriac, I thought: “b*****ks, what does he know?” So I booked in for a brain scan.’

John reveals that he was left in tears during the MRI when, after asking the nurse to play Simon & Garfunkel, the first track which came on was The Sound Of Silence.  

Hit show: Car Share finished in 2018 but did return for a one-off audio special in April amid the coronavirus pandemic (Peter is pictured in 2017)

Hit show: Car Share finished in 2018 but did return for a one-off audio special in April amid the coronavirus pandemic (Peter is pictured in 2017)

‘It got worse – in the third verse the lyrics are “silence like a cancer grows”. I was in tears. I was ashen when I came out,’ says John.

Thankfully, the sketch ends on a positive note, with John explaining that nothing was found by the doctors, and that his GP had been right: his sinuses were the issue. 

Peter’s new Car Share sketch is included in Dear NHS: 100 Stories to Say Thank You, which was curated and edited by Adam Kay.

As well as the comedian, 100 other inspirational people came together to share their personal stories about how the NHS has supported them and changed their lives. 

End of an era: The final episode saw John and Kayleigh holding hands as they sat on a bus and laughing after one of their rows ended in his car being towed, hinting they were finally going to end up a couple

End of an era: The final episode saw John and Kayleigh holding hands as they sat on a bus and laughing after one of their rows ended in his car being towed, hinting they were finally going to end up a couple

As a collection the deeply moving, hilarious and hopeful become a love letter to the NHS and the 1.4 million people who go above and beyond every single day.

Other famous faces who contributed to the book include Paul McCartney, Emilia Clarke, Stephen Fry, Dawn French, Sir Trevor McDonald and Graham Norton.

Stories from Ricky Gervais, Sir David Jason, Dame Emma Thompson, Joanna Lumley, Miranda Hart, Dermot O’Leary, Jamie Oliver and Ed Sheeran are also included. 

A minimum of £3.09 from the sale of each book will be paid to NHS Charities Together and £0.16 will be paid to The Lullaby Trust. 

Popular: Avid fans even starting a petition for a third series of Car Share after it ended, but have had no luck. Peter did release an audio special in April as well as the new sketch in the NHS tribute book (the comedian is pictured as character John alongside Kayleigh in the show)

Popular: Avid fans even starting a petition for a third series of Car Share after it ended, but have had no luck. Peter did release an audio special in April as well as the new sketch in the NHS tribute book (the comedian is pictured as character John alongside Kayleigh in the show)

Peter Kay’s Car Share series finished back in May 2018, but did return for a special one-off episode to cheer fans up amid the coronavirus pandemic.

The comedian revealed he had recorded an audio episode of the sitcom, which dropped on Friday, April 10.

Peter said: ‘It’s a horrific situation right now we’re all going through and like so many people I feel compelled to try to do something positive in an attempt to cheer people up in some way.    

‘Sian Gibson, Paul Coleman and myself got together via t’internet and wrote a new short episode of Car Share. It all happened very quickly – in fact, it didn’t exist a week ago.

Tweet: Car Share last aired in May 2018 and told the story of supermarket assistant manager John Redmond and promotions rep Kayleigh Kitson during their time in a company car sharing scheme

Tweet: Car Share last aired in May 2018 and told the story of supermarket assistant manager John Redmond and promotions rep Kayleigh Kitson during their time in a company car sharing scheme

‘Obviously we weren’t able to film anything because of the lockdown but I hope people will use their imagination and enjoy listening.’ 

Car Share last aired in May 2018 and told the story of supermarket assistant manager John Redmond and promotions rep Kayleigh Kitson during their time in a company car sharing scheme.

The final episode of the very popular series saw John and Kayleigh, played by Sian Gibson, finally getting together and holding hands on the bus.

The co-workers had to take the bus home after they had a row where the door of his red Fiat 500 car was knocked off.

Rare appearance: Peter has not been seen very often in the past two years and was recently forced to announce his Dance For Life tour had been cancelled due to the Covid-19 outbreak (pictured in 2010)

Rare appearance: Peter has not been seen very often in the past two years and was recently forced to announce his Dance For Life tour had been cancelled due to the Covid-19 outbreak (pictured in 2010)

The last scenes saw John and Kayleigh listening to music together on a bus after his car got towed. Kayleigh then rested her head on John’s shoulder, causing fans to believe that the pair were finally going to make a go of it romantically.

Avid followers of the show were gutted that the second series had come to an end, with some even starting a petition for a third series.

However, despite fans calling for more on Twitter, the comedian confirmed the Bank Holiday special was the ‘definite end’, as he feels the show went ‘out on a high’.

A huge 6.4million tuned in to watch the last episode – causing both fans and BBC bosses to beg the Manchester native for another series. 

Yet, Peter reportedly confirmed at the time that he will not be taking the show further in the future, as he feels it was left in a good place.

What a show: The sitcom surrounded two work colleagues who share a ride to work with the final episode having a huge 6.4million tune in to watch

What a show: The sitcom surrounded two work colleagues who share a ride to work with the final episode having a huge 6.4million tune in to watch

A source told The Sun: ‘He believes great sitcoms should go out on a high like Fawlty Towers. So sadly that’s definitely the end, however much fans might beg for more.’  

Since the show ended Peter has rarely been seen in public and made his first TV appearance in two years during BBC One’s The Big Night In in April 2020, which fundraised during the coronavirus pandemic.     

Fans were especially pleased as Peter had been forced to cancelled his Dance For Life tour due to the Covid-19 outbreak.

The comedian broke the news in a statement, less than a month after confirming he would be returning to the stage with his epic dance-a-thon to raise money for Cancer Research UK. 

Peter’s Dance For Life Tour would have been his long-awaited return to the spotlight after cancelling all of his work commitments in 2017 due to ‘unforeseen family circumstances.’ 

He said: ‘Obviously this is disappointing news but well and truly justified given the circumstances. We’ll get through this, together and then we’ll all have a great big dance for life. Stay safe and look after yourselves and the people around you.’

A further statement from Peter said: ‘Due to the ongoing coronavirus outbreak and following Government advice, it is with deep regret that the forthcoming Peter Kay’s Dance For Life shows are being postponed.

‘We are looking to schedule the shows so please hold onto your tickets as they will be valid for the new dates. We apologise for any inconvenience this may cause but the safety of the public is paramount.’

Bad news: Peter announced his tour had been cancelled in a statement to fans just weeks after first revealing his comeback

Bad news: Peter announced his tour had been cancelled in a statement to fans just weeks after first revealing his comeback

Police issue CCTV in hunt for racist hit-and-run driver

Police issue CCTV in hunt for racist hit-and-run driver who left black NHS worker, 21, with a broken leg, nose and cheek in Bristol

  • Police released CCTV footage as part of a investigation into a racist hit and run 
  • The NHS worker had left his shift at hospital when he was hit by the vehicle
  • It left the 21-year-old with a broken leg, nose and cheekbone and facial scars 

Police have released CCTV footage as part of a investigation into a shocking hit and run which left an NHS worker in hospital.

Four men have been arrested on suspicion of attempted murder after K – also known as K-Dogg – was badly injured while walking to a bus stop last month.

The musician had just finished his shift at Southmead Hospital, Bristol on July 22 when he was hit.

The collision left the victim, 21, with a broken leg, nose and cheekbone and facial scars which may remain for life.

The incident is being treated as racially-motivated due to the language used by the occupants of the car involved, police said.

Social affairs correspondent Fiona Lamdin used the offensive language when covering a collision between a Honda Accord and a 21-year-old man (pictured) in Bristol

Detectives have today issued CCTV footage of a vehicle pictured prior to the attack (circled in red)

Detectives have today issued CCTV footage of a vehicle pictured prior to the attack (circled in red)

Detectives have today issued CCTV footage of a vehicle pictured prior to the attack.

They want to speak anyone who recognises the car and how it is being driven in the lead up to the incident in the Horfield area of the city.

The four men who were arrested – aged 23, 22, 18 and 18 – remain under investigation, Avon and Somerset Constabulary said. 

The hit and run has since become the focal point of a race storm after a local BBC journalist used a slur in a report on the attack.

More than 18,000 people complained after Fiona Lamdin used the N-word – forcing the broadcaster to apologise. 

The man, who has been affected both mentally and physically by the assault, said he wanted people to 'be aware' of what had happened

The man, who has been affected both mentally and physically by the assault, said he wanted people to ‘be aware’ of what had happened

BBC director-general Tony Hall said in an email to staff that a “mistake” had been made and “distress” may have been caused by the decision to air the term.

The use of the derogatory language has made headlines worldwide and even prompted Radio 1Xtra DJ Sideman to quite the corporation.

Sideman, real name David Whitely, said in a statement that the “action and the defence of the action feels like a slap in the face of our community”.

The investigation into the attack in Bristol continues.   

Conman who earned £1million running two NHS can KEEP his ill-gotten gains

Jon Andrewes (pictured) told ‘staggering lies’ about his academic qualifications and experience to win a string of high-flying posts, the Court of Appeal in London heard.

A conman who chaired two NHS trusts after lying about having a PHD has been allowed to keep his £1million of ill-gotten gains after a judge ruled he gave ‘full value’ for his salary.

Jon Andrewes told ‘staggering lies’ about his academic qualifications and experience to win a string of high-flying posts, the Court of Appeal in London heard.

His dishonesty got him a £75,000 a year job as chief executive of the St Margaret’s Hospice, a charity based in Taunton, where he worked for over a decade.

And he went on to be appointed chairman of the Torbay NHS Care Trust and the Royal Cornwall NHS Hospital Trust.

Andrewes, 65, from Totnes, lived a lie for years until the truth finally emerged in 2015 and he was sacked and prosecuted.

He later pleaded guilty to two counts of fraud and one of obtaining a pecuniary advantage by deception and was jailed for two years.

The judge who locked him up said he had lived an ‘outwardly prestigious’ lifestyle purely on the basis of his ‘staggering lies’.

Andrewes’ disgrace was complete in July 2018 when a judge ruled that all the money he earned from his deception amounted to proceeds of crime.

Andrewes, 65, went on to be appointed chairman of the Royal Cornwall NHS Hospital Trust. Pictured: The Royal Cornwall Hospital

Andrewes, 65, went on to be appointed chairman of the Royal Cornwall NHS Hospital Trust. Pictured: The Royal Cornwall Hospital

After tax, he was found to have benefitted from crime to the tune of over £640,000 but, by then, most of the money had been spent.

Andrewes had every penny he had left – more than £96,000 – confiscated under the Proceeds of Crime Act.

But, overturning the bill, Appeal Court judges said he had in effect been punished twice for the same crimes.

Lord Justice Davis ruled that, having ‘properly performed his duties’ for 10 years, he had given ‘full value’ for the salary and benefits he received.

When applying for the hospice job in 2004, Andrewes claimed to have joint honours and master of philosophy degrees from Bristol University.

He said he had an MBA from Edinburgh University, a PhD from Plymouth University and an advanced diploma in accounting.

Andrewes was also appointed chairman of the Torbay NHS Care Trust

Andrewes was also appointed chairman of the Torbay NHS Care Trust

But Lord Justice Davis, who was sitting with Mrs Justice Andrews and Judge Richard Marks QC, said: ‘None of this was true.’

Giving details of his experience, Andrewes said he had been seconded to the Home Office and worked as CEO and MD of two charities.

But the judge added: ‘The actuality was very different’.

He was a social worker for 20 years and, although he held a senior post with a charity for a year, the dates did not match his CV.

There was no record of him every having worked for the other charity, let alone becoming its MD.

After two years in the hospice job, Andrewes demanded that staff address him as ‘Dr Andrewes’.

Using that title and repeating his lies, he applied for paid positions with the two NHS trusts, rising to chair of both of them.

Crown lawyers argued that every penny he made over the 10-year period, net of tax, ‘represented the proceeds of criminality’.

But for his serial dishonesty he would never have obtained any of the high-flying posts, said barrister, Martin Evans QC.

Upholding Andrewes’ appeal, however, Lord Justice Davis said he was not alleged to have led ‘a criminal lifestyle’.

He added: ‘It is essential to bear in mind the fundamental point that a confiscation order is not designed to be a punishment.’

Even if he still had the money, it would make ‘no sense’ to strip Andrewes’ of all his earnings over the 10-year period as if he had not done a stroke of work.

The thought that a shelf-stacker who lied on his CV about his criminal record might have to pay back his entire earnings was ‘unappealing’.

The judge ruled: ‘Andrewes is to be taken as having over the years given full value, in terms of the services he provided, to the hospice and trusts in return for the remuneration which he obtained.

‘Throughout, as is to be taken, he properly performed his duties…whilst he had obtained the positions dishonestly, they were positions which he was otherwise lawfully entitled to hold.’

Through his work, he had already made ‘full restoration’ of the money he received and to also hit him with a confiscation order ‘would involve a double penalty,’ the judge concluded.

Giving guidance for the future, Lord Justice Davis said prosecutors ‘may need to reflect long and hard’ before seeking confiscation orders against those who get jobs by lying on their CVs.

The ‘disproportionate’ confiscation order, which totalled £96,737, was overturned.

NHS trusts tell women seeking IVF to prove they’re in a ‘stable’ relationship

Dozens of NHS trusts tell women seeking IVF to prove they’re in a ‘stable’ relationship – creating infertility ‘postcode lottery’

  • IVF patients in some areas in England must prove 3-year ‘stable’ relationship status to be eligible for free infertility treatment
  • 24 CCGs require relationship stability to ‘ensure the welfare of the child’ 
  • However, local policies differ leaving patients ‘confused and upset’
  • IVF counsellor claims women lie about relationship to get infertility treatment

Women seeking IVF treatment on the NHS, in some areas of England, must prove they are in a three-year ‘stable’ relationship to get funding.

However, local policies differ from region to region creating an infertility ‘postcode lottery’ based on relationship status. 

In Cornwall, a patient must have a partner of two years and be in a ‘financially interdependent’ relationship to be eligible for treatment, according to the policy for Kernow CCG.

But in Devon, single women are allowed IVF on the NHS. 

Kernow CCG said its criteria were ‘agreed in consultation with clinicians’ to ensure the welfare of the child. 

Some women seeking IVF treatment on the NHS must prove they are in a three-year ‘stable’ relationship to get funding, depending on where they live

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) makes recommendations about who should have access to IVF treatment on the NHS in England and Wales.

However, NHS clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) make the final decision about who can have NHS-funded IVF in their local area – and their criteria may be stricter than those recommended by NICE.  

The policies of 24 out of England’s 135 CCGs require patients to be in a ‘stable’ relationship – some requiring three years, while others require two years, according to the Sunday Times.  

Nearly half of CCGs in England (48%) do not allow for single women in their criteria. 

Other common policies in all CCGs is that the welfare of the child should be considered according to evidence-based criteria, and parents who smoke, are overweight or have an addiction are ruled out. 

However, they have ‘inconsistent’ policies on the upper age limit for patients, how many rounds of IVF they can have and whether or not their partner has a child from a former relationship.

One IVF counsellor claims that some women lie about their relationship status to get NHS infertility treatment.

Joanita Namugenyi, conceived through IVF and now counsels other women having fertility treatment. 

She claims to know of women who lied about their relationship status to get treatment, saying: ‘They know they won’t get it otherwise.’ 

Local CCG policies for IVF treatment differ leaving patients 'confused and upset'

Local CCG policies for IVF treatment differ leaving patients ‘confused and upset’

One IVF patient, Kate, from east London, initially sought NHS-funded IVF aged 39 before going private.

She had been trying to conceive with a close friend of 10 years but because they live at separate addresses, their lawyer advised them that they could be turned down for NHS funding. 

Kate, who works in education, ended up paying £20,000 to go private rather than risk being refused. 

‘It’s not a gamble I could take,’ she said.

Professor Tim Child, who helped to write the fertility guidelines for Nice, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, said CCGs were ‘applying their own, made-up criteria’ to help them ‘ration’ services.

‘It causes confusion and upset for patients,’ he said.

Professor Geeta Nargund, lead consultant in reproductive medicine services at St George’s Hospital in south London, said: ‘The postcode lottery for IVF treatment urgently needs to be addressed.’

BBC finally APOLOGISES after correspondent said ‘n****r’ in news report

‘We made a mistake’: BBC finally APOLOGISES after social affairs correspondent Fiona Lamdin said ‘n****r’ in news report about hit-and-run attack on black NHS worker

  • Social affairs correspondent Fiona Lamdin said highly-offensive term on July 29
  • Tony Hall said they ‘made a mistake’ and ‘should have taken different approach’ 
  • More than  18,000 people complained to the BBC after the broadcast was made

The BBC has finally apologised nearly two weeks after a white presenter said ‘n****r’ in a news report. 

More than 18,000 people complained to the BBC after social affairs correspondent Fiona Lamdin said the highly-offensive term while covering a racist hit-and-run attack on a black NHS worker on July 29.

And now, 11 days after the initial report was made, the broadcaster’s director-general Lord Tony Hall said they ‘made a mistake’ and ‘should have taken a different approach’.

After the broadcaster initially defended the report, Lord Hall said in an email sent to all BBC staff: ‘This morning I brought together a group of BBC colleagues to discuss our news coverage of the recent shocking attack on an NHS worker. I wanted us to look at the issues raised by the reporting and the strength of feeling surrounding it.

Fiona Lamdin, left, used a racially offensive slur during a news broadcast on July 29

Viewers were warned ahead of the broadcast about the racially offensive language

Viewers were warned ahead of the broadcast about the racially offensive language 

‘We are proud of the BBC’s values of inclusion and respect, and have reflected long and hard on what people have had to say about the use of the n-word and all racist language both inside and outside the organisation.

‘It should be clear that the BBC’s intention was to highlight an alleged racist attack. This is important journalism which the BBC should be reporting on and we will continue to do so.

‘Yet despite these good intentions, I recognise that we have ended up creating distress amongst many people.

‘The BBC now accepts that we should have taken a different approach at the time of broadcast and we are very sorry for that. We will now be strengthening our guidance on offensive language across our output.

‘Every organisation should be able to acknowledge when it has made a mistake. We made one here. It is important for us to listen – and also to learn. And that is what we will continue to do.’ 

Social affairs correspondent Fiona Lamdin used the offensive term when covering the collision between a Honda Accord and a 21-year-old man in Bristol.

The car was said to have deliberately hit the victim as he left Southmead Hospital after a shift last Wednesday.

Horrified witnesses said he was flung from the pavement into a nearby garden as two thugs reportedly hurled racist abuse at him.

Social affairs correspondent Fiona Lamdin used the offensive language when covering a collision between a Honda Accord and a 21-year-old man (pictured) in Bristol

Social affairs correspondent Fiona Lamdin used the offensive language when covering a collision between a Honda Accord and a 21-year-old man (pictured) in Bristol

Lamdin shocked viewers during the 10.30am clip for BBC Points West when she said: ‘Just to warn you, you’re about to hear highly offensive language.’

She added: ‘Because as the men ran away, they hurled racial abuse, calling him a n*****.’

BBC guidance says strong language should not be used before the 9pm watershed, but ‘n****r’ is usually seen as too rude to ever air.

BBC finally APOLOGISES after correspondent said ‘n****r’ in news report

‘We made a mistake’: BBC finally APOLOGISES after social affairs correspondent Fiona Lamdin said ‘n****r’ in news report about hit-and-run attack on black NHS worker

  • Social affairs correspondent Fiona Lamdin said highly-offensive term on July 29
  • Tony Hall said they ‘made a mistake’ and ‘should have taken different approach’ 
  • More than  18,000 people complained to the BBC after the broadcast was made

The BBC has finally apologised nearly two weeks after a white presenter said ‘n****r’ in a news report. 

More than 18,000 people complained to the BBC after social affairs correspondent Fiona Lamdin said the highly-offensive term while covering a racist hit-and-run attack on a black NHS worker on July 29.

And now, 11 days after the initial report was made, the broadcaster’s director-general Lord Tony Hall said they ‘made a mistake’ and ‘should have taken a different approach’.

Lord Hall said in an email sent to all BBC staff: ‘This morning I brought together a group of BBC colleagues to discuss our news coverage of the recent shocking attack on an NHS worker. I wanted us to look at the issues raised by the reporting and the strength of feeling surrounding it.

Fiona Lamdin, left, used a racially offensive slur during a news broadcast on July 29

Viewers were warned ahead of the broadcast about the racially offensive language

Viewers were warned ahead of the broadcast about the racially offensive language 

‘We are proud of the BBC’s values of inclusion and respect, and have reflected long and hard on what people have had to say about the use of the n-word and all racist language both inside and outside the organisation.

‘It should be clear that the BBC’s intention was to highlight an alleged racist attack. This is important journalism which the BBC should be reporting on and we will continue to do so.

‘Yet despite these good intentions, I recognise that we have ended up creating distress amongst many people.

‘The BBC now accepts that we should have taken a different approach at the time of broadcast and we are very sorry for that. We will now be strengthening our guidance on offensive language across our output.

‘Every organisation should be able to acknowledge when it has made a mistake. We made one here. It is important for us to listen – and also to learn. And that is what we will continue to do.’ 

Social affairs correspondent Fiona Lamdin used the offensive term when covering the collision between a Honda Accord and a 21-year-old man in Bristol.

The car was said to have deliberately hit the victim as he left Southmead Hospital after a shift last Wednesday.

Horrified witnesses said he was flung from the pavement into a nearby garden as two thugs reportedly hurled racist abuse at him.

Social affairs correspondent Fiona Lamdin used the offensive language when covering a collision between a Honda Accord and a 21-year-old man (pictured) in Bristol

Social affairs correspondent Fiona Lamdin used the offensive language when covering a collision between a Honda Accord and a 21-year-old man (pictured) in Bristol

Lamdin shocked viewers during the 10.30am clip for BBC Points West when she said: ‘Just to warn you, you’re about to hear highly offensive language.’

She added: ‘Because as the men ran away, they hurled racial abuse, calling him a n*****.’

BBC guidance says strong language should not be used before the 9pm watershed, but ‘n****r’ is usually seen as too rude to ever air.

NHS trusts tell women seeking IVF to prove they’re in a ‘stable’ relationship

Dozens of NHS trusts tell women seeking IVF to prove they’re in a ‘stable’ relationship – creating infertility ‘postcode lottery’

  • IVF patients in some areas in England must prove 3-year ‘stable’ relationship status to be eligible for free infertility treatment
  • 24 CCGs require relationship stability to ‘ensure the welfare of the child’ 
  • However, local policies differ leaving patients ‘confused and upset’
  • IVF counsellor claims women lie about relationship to get infertility treatment

Women seeking IVF treatment on the NHS, in some areas of England, must prove they are in a three-year ‘stable’ relationship to get funding.

However, local policies differ from region to region creating an infertility ‘postcode lottery’ based on relationship status. 

In Cornwall, a patient must have a partner of two years and be in a ‘financially interdependent’ relationship to be eligible for treatment, according to the policy for Kernow CCG.

But in Devon, single women are allowed IVF on the NHS. 

Kernow CCG said its criteria were ‘agreed in consultation with clinicians’ to ensure the welfare of the child. 

Some women seeking IVF treatment on the NHS must prove they are in a three-year ‘stable’ relationship to get funding, depending on where they live

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) makes recommendations about who should have access to IVF treatment on the NHS in England and Wales.

However, NHS clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) make the final decision about who can have NHS-funded IVF in their local area – and their criteria may be stricter than those recommended by NICE.  

The policies of 24 out of England’s 135 CCGs require patients to be in a ‘stable’ relationship – some requiring three years, while others require two years, according to the Sunday Times.  

Nearly half of CCGs in England (48%) do not allow for single women in their criteria. 

Other common policies in all CCGs is that the welfare of the child should be considered according to evidence-based criteria, and parents who smoke, are overweight or have an addiction are ruled out. 

However, they have ‘inconsistent’ policies on the upper age limit for patients, how many rounds of IVF they can have and whether or not their partner has a child from a former relationship.

One IVF counsellor claims that some women lie about their relationship status to get NHS infertility treatment.

Joanita Namugenyi, conceived through IVF and now counsels other women having fertility treatment. 

She claims to know of women who lied about their relationship status to get treatment, saying: ‘They know they won’t get it otherwise.’ 

Local CCG policies for IVF treatment differ leaving patients 'confused and upset'

Local CCG policies for IVF treatment differ leaving patients ‘confused and upset’

One IVF patient, Kate, from east London, initially sought NHS-funded IVF aged 39 before going private.

She had been trying to conceive with a close friend of 10 years but because they live at separate addresses, their lawyer advised them that they could be turned down for NHS funding. 

Kate, who works in education, ended up paying £20,000 to go private rather than risk being refused. 

‘It’s not a gamble I could take,’ she said.

Professor Tim Child, who helped to write the fertility guidelines for Nice, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, said CCGs were ‘applying their own, made-up criteria’ to help them ‘ration’ services.

‘It causes confusion and upset for patients,’ he said.

Professor Geeta Nargund, lead consultant in reproductive medicine services at St George’s Hospital in south London, said: ‘The postcode lottery for IVF treatment urgently needs to be addressed.’