Coronavirus: Spain had 17k ‘unexplained’ extra deaths in 2020


New official data in Spain released on Wednesday showed that many more people have died this year than the recorded number of coronavirus fatalities suggests, raising questions over almost 17,000 unexplained deaths.

The data also revealed a shocking 155% spike in mortality at the epidemic’s peak in early April when compared with the same period a year earlier.

The figures showed that a total of 225,930 people died in Spain in the first 21 weeks of 2020 – 43,945 more than the same period of 2019 and 16,818 more than the health ministry’s current total confirmed coronavirus death toll. 

This means that there have been 16,818 more unexplained deaths than there was during the same period last year that have not been put down to Covid-19.

Experts believe these include cases where the cause is hard to establish due to underlying conditions, and fatalities among people who avoided hospital treatment for other problems due to the fear of contracting the virus.

Today, figures showed that a total of 225,930 people died in Spain in the first 21 weeks of 2020 – 43,945 more than the same period of 2019, with 16,818 unexplained deaths. Pictured: People wave Spanish flags as they hold a minute of silence for the victims of COVID-19 at Sol square in downtown Madrid, June 3

Overall mortality in Spain jumped its highest, 155%, in the worst week of the coronavirus outbreak in early April from the same period a year earlier, according to data from the the National Statistics Institute (INE). 

This year – during the week from March 30 to April 5 – there were 20,575 deaths in Spain, compared with 8,081 during the same week in 2019. 

The INE said it was starting an experimental series monitoring the weekly mortality rate to help shed light on the impact of the pandemic.

The data from the INE was consistent with figures from the National Epidemiology Centre, which estimates mortality comparing deaths recorded across civil registries with historical averages. 

Supporting the Spanish government’s belief the worst is over, on the last week analysed by the INE, between May 18-24, mortality was at the same level as a year earlier.

Elderly people over 90 were the hardest hit so far this year, with 27% more deaths over the 21-week period, while 25% more died among those aged 85-89. There was hardly any difference from a year earlier in groups under 54 years old. 

The institute’s data is higher than the official Health Ministry death toll of the pandemic, which on Wednesday stood at 27,127. 

That counts only those who died having tested positive for COVID-19. Officials say the disparities are due to people who died without being tested or from other causes. The figure for excess deaths is seen as a more accurate reflection of the toll wreaked by the pandemic.  

Spain claimed to have suffered zero coronavirus deaths for the second day running Tuesday, with just one being added to the total on Wednesday, amid doubt over the numbers after they changed the way they are tallied

Spain claimed to have suffered zero coronavirus deaths for the second day running Tuesday, with just one being added to the total on Wednesday, amid doubt over the numbers after they changed the way they are tallied

The country also claimed today to have seen just 219 new coronavirus cases in the last 24 hours, though the overall total moved upwards by 394 because of how it now reports the numbers

The country also claimed today to have seen just 219 new coronavirus cases in the last 24 hours, though the overall total moved upwards by 394 because of how it now reports the numbers

Today, Spain’s official total number of Covid-19 deaths increased by one – its first recorded death in three days, but due to the way it now tallies the figure the country’s data has been accused of being unreliable. 

On Wednesday, its ‘deaths in the last seven days’ figure stood at 63 when on Tuesday it stood at 34, an increase of 29, suggesting it had added more deaths to previous days that had not been registered before.

Spain’s new experimental method of reporting means that it is impossible to know when the deaths occurred from the daily bulletin released by the government, or whether the figure has moved up or down day-to-day.

Experts have also said that the country’s R rating – which is used to check whether a second peak of infection is coming – is impossible to calculate as the nation prepares itself to reopen to tourists from some countries. 

The country’s old daily totals included all cases entered into government databases in the last 24 hours, regardless of when the actual infection or death occurred.

This is how most world countries have been reporting their data.

But Spain now only counts cases and deaths in its daily figures where the person fell sick or died within 36 hours of the report being published.

Experts believe the unexplained deaths include cases where the cause is hard to establish due to underlying conditions, and fatalities among people who avoided hospital treatment. Pictured: Healthcare workers demonstrate in Barcelona for stable contract conditions, a 100 percent public healthcare and individual protection equipment for health workers in Catalonia, June 3, 2020

Experts believe the unexplained deaths include cases where the cause is hard to establish due to underlying conditions, and fatalities among people who avoided hospital treatment. Pictured: Healthcare workers demonstrate in Barcelona for stable contract conditions, a 100 percent public healthcare and individual protection equipment for health workers in Catalonia, June 3, 2020

Pictured: Spain's Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez takes part in the Government's question time session prior to voting an extension of the state of emergency amid the coronavirus outbreak in Madrid on June 3, 2020

Pictured: Spain’s Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez takes part in the Government’s question time session prior to voting an extension of the state of emergency amid the coronavirus outbreak in Madrid on June 3, 2020

The new reporting method has caused discrepancies with Spain’s totals. 

For example, the country claimed to have suffered just 208 cases in the 48 hours before Tuesday’s figures were released, but its infection total moved up by 503.

That is because the extra 295 cases have been back-dated to different days. Spain does not say as part of its daily briefing when these cases occurred.

Experts said on Tuesday that it is ‘unlikely’ that the country had really suffered no deaths for two days, and the ‘zero’ figure is likely the result of a data backlog.

It often takes more than 36 hours to register a cause of death.

According to the UK’s Office for National Statistics, the average time taken to register a death in England and Wales in 2018 – the most recent year for which data is available – was five days.

Spain has seen nearly 17,000 ‘unexplained’ extra deaths since the start of 2020


New official data in Spain released on Wednesday showed that many more people have died this year than the recorded number of coronavirus fatalities suggests, raising questions over almost 17,000 unexplained deaths.

The data also revealed a shocking 155% spike in mortality at the epidemic’s peak in early April when compared with the same period a year earlier.

The figures showed that a total of 225,930 people died in Spain in the first 21 weeks of 2020 – 43,945 more than the same period of 2019 and 16,818 more than the health ministry’s current total confirmed coronavirus death toll. 

This means that there have been 16,818 more unexplained deaths than there was during the same period last year that have not been put down to Covid-19.

Experts believe these include cases where the cause is hard to establish due to underlying conditions, and fatalities among people who avoided hospital treatment for other problems due to the fear of contracting the virus.

Today, figures showed that a total of 225,930 people died in Spain in the first 21 weeks of 2020 – 43,945 more than the same period of 2019, with 16,818 unexplained deaths. Pictured: People wave Spanish flags as they hold a minute of silence for the victims of COVID-19 at Sol square in downtown Madrid, June 3

Overall mortality in Spain jumped its highest, 155%, in the worst week of the coronavirus outbreak in early April from the same period a year earlier, according to data from the the National Statistics Institute (INE). 

This year – during the week from March 30 to April 5 – there were 20,575 deaths in Spain, compared with 8,081 during the same week in 2019. 

The INE said it was starting an experimental series monitoring the weekly mortality rate to help shed light on the impact of the pandemic.

The data from the INE was consistent with figures from the National Epidemiology Centre, which estimates mortality comparing deaths recorded across civil registries with historical averages. 

Supporting the Spanish government’s belief the worst is over, on the last week analysed by the INE, between May 18-24, mortality was at the same level as a year earlier.

Elderly people over 90 were the hardest hit so far this year, with 27% more deaths over the 21-week period, while 25% more died among those aged 85-89. There was hardly any difference from a year earlier in groups under 54 years old. 

The institute’s data is higher than the official Health Ministry death toll of the pandemic, which on Wednesday stood at 27,127. 

That counts only those who died having tested positive for COVID-19. Officials say the disparities are due to people who died without being tested or from other causes. The figure for excess deaths is seen as a more accurate reflection of the toll wreaked by the pandemic.  

Spain claimed to have suffered zero coronavirus deaths for the second day running Tuesday, with just one being added to the total on Wednesday, amid doubt over the numbers after they changed the way they are tallied

Spain claimed to have suffered zero coronavirus deaths for the second day running Tuesday, with just one being added to the total on Wednesday, amid doubt over the numbers after they changed the way they are tallied

The country also claimed today to have seen just 219 new coronavirus cases in the last 24 hours, though the overall total moved upwards by 394 because of how it now reports the numbers

The country also claimed today to have seen just 219 new coronavirus cases in the last 24 hours, though the overall total moved upwards by 394 because of how it now reports the numbers

Today, Spain’s official total number of Covid-19 deaths increased by one – its first recorded death in three days, but due to the way it now tallies the figure the country’s data has been accused of being unreliable. 

On Wednesday, its ‘deaths in the last seven days’ figure stood at 63 when on Tuesday it stood at 34, an increase of 29, suggesting it had added more deaths to previous days that had not been registered before.

Spain’s new experimental method of reporting means that it is impossible to know when the deaths occurred from the daily bulletin released by the government, or whether the figure has moved up or down day-to-day.

Experts have also said that the country’s R rating – which is used to check whether a second peak of infection is coming – is impossible to calculate as the nation prepares itself to reopen to tourists from some countries. 

The country’s old daily totals included all cases entered into government databases in the last 24 hours, regardless of when the actual infection or death occurred.

This is how most world countries have been reporting their data.

But Spain now only counts cases and deaths in its daily figures where the person fell sick or died within 36 hours of the report being published.

Experts believe the unexplained deaths include cases where the cause is hard to establish due to underlying conditions, and fatalities among people who avoided hospital treatment. Pictured: Healthcare workers demonstrate in Barcelona for stable contract conditions, a 100 percent public healthcare and individual protection equipment for health workers in Catalonia, June 3, 2020

Experts believe the unexplained deaths include cases where the cause is hard to establish due to underlying conditions, and fatalities among people who avoided hospital treatment. Pictured: Healthcare workers demonstrate in Barcelona for stable contract conditions, a 100 percent public healthcare and individual protection equipment for health workers in Catalonia, June 3, 2020

Pictured: Spain's Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez takes part in the Government's question time session prior to voting an extension of the state of emergency amid the coronavirus outbreak in Madrid on June 3, 2020

Pictured: Spain’s Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez takes part in the Government’s question time session prior to voting an extension of the state of emergency amid the coronavirus outbreak in Madrid on June 3, 2020

The new reporting method has caused discrepancies with Spain’s totals. 

For example, the country claimed to have suffered just 208 cases in the 48 hours before Tuesday’s figures were released, but its infection total moved up by 503.

That is because the extra 295 cases have been back-dated to different days. Spain does not say as part of its daily briefing when these cases occurred.

Experts said on Tuesday that it is ‘unlikely’ that the country had really suffered no deaths for two days, and the ‘zero’ figure is likely the result of a data backlog.

It often takes more than 36 hours to register a cause of death.

According to the UK’s Office for National Statistics, the average time taken to register a death in England and Wales in 2018 – the most recent year for which data is available – was five days.

Searches for holidays in Spain and Greece increase more than 50 per cent says TravelSupermarket


Searches for package holidays to Spain this summer have increased by 52 per cent, Greece by 51 per cent and Portugal by 38 per cent in the past fortnight on the back of news that European tourism is reopening and quarantine-free air bridges can be established.

There have been 40 per cent more price comparison searches for July, August and September holidays in the past two weeks. That’s according to searches on holiday price comparison site TravelSupermarket from May 16 to 30 compared with the previous fortnight, for package holidays overseas departing between July 1 and October 31 this year.

Portugal has gone up two places in the search rankings in the past fortnight, compared with the start of May, to become the fifth most popular summer holiday search option for Britons.

Searches for package holidays to Spain this summer have increased by 52 per cent, Greece by 51 per cent and Portugal by 38 per cent, says TravelSupermarket 

This uptake in searches for Portuguese holidays is on the back of of the country’s announcement that it is hoping to welcome holidaymakers including Britons as soon as possible and will not quarantine them.

Greece has also been one of the first countries in Europe to say it wants to welcome back international holidaymakers – international flights will be operating to its two largest mainland airports from mid-June.

Similarly, Spain has been outlining in the past two weeks its desire for tourists to return in July and for the summer season to be salvaged.

According to TravelSupermarket, as Britons look to get away when lockdown restrictions are lifted, the country of choice to visit before the end of October is Spain.

In second place is Greece followed by the United States, Turkey and Portugal.

When it comes to more specific destinations, the top ten most-searched-for places by Britons in the past fortnight for a holiday to depart between July 1 and October 30, 2020, are Las Vegas (first), Tenerife (second), the Maldives (third), the Costa Blanca (fourth), Dubai (fifth), Orlando (sixth), Canary Islands (seventh), Majorca (eighth), Amsterdam (ninth) and Crete (10th). 

An uptake in searches for Portuguese holidays is on the back of of the country’s announcement that it is hoping to welcome holidaymakers including Britons as soon as possible and will not quarantine them. Pictured is a beach in the Algarve

An uptake in searches for Portuguese holidays is on the back of of the country’s announcement that it is hoping to welcome holidaymakers including Britons as soon as possible and will not quarantine them. Pictured is a beach in the Algarve 

BRITONS’ MOST POPULAR HOLIDAY DESTINATIONS

Most popular destinations to search for a holiday for between July 1 and October 30, 2020

1. Las Vegas

2. Tenerife

3. The Maldives

4. Costa Blanca

5. Dubai

6. Orlando

7. Canary Islands

8. Majorca

9. Amsterdam

10. Crete

Most popular countries to search for a holiday after lockdown, any departure date

1. Spain

2. U.S

3. Greece

4. Maldives

5. Turkey

6. Mexico

7. Italy

8. Portugal

9. Cyprus

10. Unite Arab Emirates

Source: TravelSupermarket 

TravelSupermarket points out that searches for package holidays to Crete have shot up by 73 per cent in the past two weeks – it was in 19th place.

The website says this comes as many airlines and holiday companies say they will resume flights to the Greek Islands from the beginning of July.

Package holiday price enquiries to Tenerife have increased by 36 per cent and to the Costa Blanca by 46 per cent, taking holidays to resorts including Benidorm from seventh to fourth most popular with Britons.

Emma Coulthurst, travel commentator from TravelSupermarket, said: ‘There are more people searching for a holiday now for this summer than there were at the beginning of May. Talk of air bridges and countries opening up to tourism appears to be getting people searching and comparing holiday prices.

TravelSupermarket says that package holiday price enquiries to the Costa Blanca, pictured, have increased by 46 per cent

TravelSupermarket says that package holiday price enquiries to the Costa Blanca, pictured, have increased by 46 per cent

‘Holiday prices have also been creeping down in the past fortnight and there are some good prices on offer. However, the reality is that we don’t yet know when Brits will be able to travel again.

‘The Foreign and Commonwealth Office indefinite advice against anything but essential travel remains in place and there is no indication of when this will be lifted. It is wait and see as to which countries will let Britons travel there and when – and when the UK Government will allow Brits to travel overseas for holidays again. The UK 14 day quarantine is also set to come in on Monday (June 8) and to be reviewed in the last week of June.

‘Despite the increase in people searching for holidays for this summer in the past week, people are clicking through from our site and booking with travel companies for next summer, more than they are for this summer. There needs to be more certainty before people are willing to take the plunge on this summer more than next.’

HOLIDAY SEARCHES IN THE PAST FORTNIGHT FOR ANY FUTURE DEPARTURE DATE

TravelSupermarket also looked at the most popular holiday searches for all dates in the future, not just this summer.

The most-searched-for destination between May 16 and 30 was the Maldives, followed by Las Vegas and Orlando.

Tenerife was in fourth place, New York fifth and Cancun was sixth. The Costa Blanca came seventh with the Canary Islands eighth, Dubai ninth and Amsterdam 10th.

The rest of the top 20 most-popular searches in the past fortnight were Lanzarote (11th), Ibiza (12th), Majorca (13th), Dominican Republic (14th), Bali (15th), Barbados (16th), Cape Verde (17th), Jamaica (18th), Hawaii (19th) and The Algarve (20th).

The most-searched-for destination for all departures in the future between May 16 and 30 was the Maldives, pictured

The most-searched-for destination for all departures in the future between May 16 and 30 was the Maldives, pictured 

Island escapes seem particularly popular as 11 of the top 20 most popular searches are to islands.

TravelSupermarket says that Ibiza has seen the biggest jump in search interest in the past two weeks, up 85 per cent, taking it from the 22nd to the 11th most-searched destination for a future holiday from the UK.

The website points out that the Balearic Islands, as a whole, have seen a 55 per cent increase in clicks in the past fortnight.

There has been a 48 per cent increase in searches to Portugal, taking it from 13th to the eighth most-searched country for holidays from the UK in the space of a fortnight and there has been a 45 per cent increase in holiday prices searches to Greece.

Spain has seen a 43 per cent increase in holiday price searches as has Italy, says TravelSupermarket. 

Other destinations that have seen a significant uplift in searches in the past fortnight are Crete (68 per cent), the Costa del Sol (63 per cent), Tenerife (46 per cent), Lanzarote (44 per cent), Rhodes (44 per cent), Goa (40 per cent), the Algarve (38 per cent), Santorini (37 per cent) and Cancun (36 per cent).

The most popular country on British holidaymakers’ wishlists to visit after lockdown is Spain (No1), followed by the U.S, Greece, the Maldives and Turkey.

The rest of the top 10 comprises Mexico (sixth), Italy (seventh), Portugal (eighth), Cyprus (ninth) and the United Arab Emirates (10th).

THE MOST POPULAR MONTHS FOR A HOLIDAY

When looking at all holiday searches in May on TravelSupermarket, the price comparison website says that October 2020 is the most popular departure month. It is followed by September 2020, December 2020 and May 2021.

Data shows that the most popular destinations to search for an October 2020 holiday are the Canary Islands, Las Vegas, Dubai, the Costa Blanca and New York.

Las Vegas, pictured, is one of the most popular destinations for searches for a holiday for October 2020

Las Vegas, pictured, is one of the most popular destinations for searches for a holiday for October 2020 

The most popular destinations that Britons are comparing prices for in September are the Costa Blanca, Tenerife, Crete, Dubai and Las Vegas.

For December, the wish list is headed up by New York, followed by Tenerife, Lanzarote, the Maldives and Dubai.

For May 2021, British holidaymakers are looking and booking ahead for holidays to Orlando, followed by Majorca, the Maldives, the Balearic Islands and the Costa Blanca.

For departures being looked at for this July and August, the most price comparison searches are for the Canary and Balearic Islands and the resorts in and around Antalya in Turkey.

Other price comparison sites are available.  

BARGAIN HOLIDAY PRICE EXAMPLES FOR 2020  

Ibiza, three-star self-catering departing on August 17 for two adults and two school-aged children for seven nights from £326pp, reduced from £435pp.

Costa del Sol, four-star self-catering departing on August 19 for seven nights for two adults and two school-aged children from £354pp, reduced from £428pp.

Costa Blanca, four-star self-catering for seven nights departing on September 9 for two from £285pp, reduced from £373pp.

Rhodes, four-star self-catering departing on September 19 for seven nights for two from £142pp.

Dubai, five-star half-board departing on October 18 for seven nights for two from £470pp, reduced from £542pp.

Source: TravelSupermarket (prices correct as of June 2, 2020). 

Villanelle’s flat from season three of Killing Eve is on Airbnb 


The Barcelona filming location for Villanelle’s flat in season three of Killing Eve is a stunning Art Nouveau apartment that’s available to rent on Airbnb

  • The Art Nouveau property is listed on Airbnb as ‘Our house: Architects’ flat’, but its name is Casa Ramos 
  • Some Killing Eve scenes were filmed in the rentable flat, some in the family home that it’s part of
  • The host offers guided tours of the entire property, which is rich in Art Nouveau details and steeped in history
  • NOTE: The FCO currently advises British nationals against all but essential international travel 

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Killing Eve’s fictional assassin Villanelle has a killer flat in season three of the hit show – and the real-life Barcelona apartment used as the filming location is available to rent through Airbnb.

A wonderfully lavish place to lurk post-lockdown, with interiors to die for.

The Art Nouveau property is listed on Airbnb as ‘Our house: Architects’ flat’, but its actual name is Casa Ramos and it’s located in the Gracia area.

Killing Eve’s fictional assassin Villanelle has a killer flat in season three of the hit show – and the real-life Barcelona apartment (pictured) used as the filming location is available to rent through Airbnb

The Art Nouveau property is listed on Airbnb as 'Our house: Architects' flat', but its actual name is Casa Ramos and it's located in the Gracia area

The Art Nouveau property is listed on Airbnb as ‘Our house: Architects’ flat’, but its actual name is Casa Ramos and it’s located in the Gracia area

The apartment available for rent sits within a family home, with some scenes for Killing Eve filmed in the former’s bathroom and hall, and others in the latter’s eye-catching rooms.

But the family home isn’t off-limits – the host offers tours of the whole property. 

He says: ‘Go deep into Art Nouveau architecture with this visit to my family’s home, Casa Ramos, a Catalan Modernist gem, where I live.

A scene featuring Villanelle (played by Jodie Comer) from season three of Killing Eve that was filmed in the hallway of the Barcelona Airbnb apartment

A scene featuring Villanelle (played by Jodie Comer) from season three of Killing Eve that was filmed in the hallway of the Barcelona Airbnb apartment

Here's the hallway as it appears in the Airbnb listing. The apartments costs around £230 a night

Here’s the hallway as it appears in the Airbnb listing. The apartments costs around £230 a night

The apartment available for rent sits within a family home, with some scenes for Killing Eve filmed in the former's bathroom and hall, and others in the latter's eye-catching rooms (above)

The apartment available for rent sits within a family home, with some scenes for Killing Eve filmed in the former’s bathroom and hall, and others in the latter’s eye-catching rooms (above) 

The host offers tours of the entire property (above), which will no doubt delight Killing Eve fans

The host offers tours of the entire property (above), which will no doubt delight Killing Eve fans

Killer view: Here's Villanelle gazing out of the incredible apartment...

Killer view: Here’s Villanelle gazing out of the incredible apartment…

... in this matching exterior shot of the actual apartment, the foliage is a bit more colourful

… in this matching exterior shot of the actual apartment, the foliage is a bit more colourful

‘Steeped in history, every exposed surface is abundant in Art Nouveau details, original tiles, stained glass windows, and spectacular Arabesque features.’

The listing for the rentable apartment, meanwhile, says: ‘Unusual, very spacious “Art Nouveau” flat with reception hall, studio, dining, living-room, gallery, two bedrooms, a kitchen and a bathroom. An architectural experience in the Modernista Barcelona of 1906.’

It adds: ‘Gracia is one of the trendy areas in Barcelona where there are many designer shops, supermarkets, restaurants, bars and cinemas.’

The listing for the rentable apartment says: 'Unusual, very spacious "Art Nouveau" flat with reception hall, studio, dining, living-room, gallery, two bedrooms, a kitchen and a bathroom. An architectural experience in the Modernista Barcelona of 1906'

The listing for the rentable apartment says: ‘Unusual, very spacious “Art Nouveau” flat with reception hall, studio, dining, living-room, gallery, two bedrooms, a kitchen and a bathroom. An architectural experience in the Modernista Barcelona of 1906’

The season three finale of Killing Eve aired on Sunday night – and a fourth season has been confirmed

The season three finale of Killing Eve aired on Sunday night – and a fourth season has been confirmed

The Gracia area, where the apartment (pictured) is located, is described as 'trendy'

The Gracia area, where the apartment (pictured) is located, is described as ‘trendy’

The season three finale of Killing Eve aired on Sunday night – and a fourth season has been confirmed.

You can read all about the finale here – but warning, there are spoilers. 

Casa Ramos costs from around £230 a night and sleeps four.

Spain reports ZERO coronavirus deaths in 24 hours for the first time since March 


Spain reports ZERO coronavirus deaths in 24 hours for the first time since March

  • Spain had no coronavirus deaths over 24 hours for the first time since March 
  • The country also reported there had been only 71 new infections over 24 hours
  • Spanish people flocked to beaches today as they were reopened in Malaga

Spain has reported no deaths related to coronavirus over a 24-hour period for the first time since March.

The country also confirmed there had only been 71 new infection in the 24-hour period.

This death-free period was described as ‘very, very encouraging’ by Spain’s emergency health response chief Fernando Simon.

Spain has reported no deaths related to coronavirus over a 24-hour period for the first time since March. Pictured: People enjoy the Misericordia beach today as Malaga reopens them

This was followed by the news that the country reported only 71 new coronavirus infections across 24 hours. Pictured: People enjoy Velez beach, Malaga, today while following social distancing

This was followed by the news that the country reported only 71 new coronavirus infections across 24 hours. Pictured: People enjoy Velez beach, Malaga, today while following social distancing

He said: ‘We are in a very good place in the evolution of the pandemic.

‘The statistics are following a trend.

‘They are going the right direction.’

The last time Spain was able to report no deaths linked to coronavirus was back in March, with their first two covid-19 deaths coming on March 3.

Following these deaths, Spain saw a dramatic increase in both infections and deaths rising to a peak of 950 deaths in 24 hours on April 2.

According to the John Hopkins University, Spain has so far seen just under 240,000 confirmed cases and 27,127 deaths. Pictured: People enjoy La Malagueta beach today during the first day of Phase 2 of de-escalation due to Covid-19

According to the John Hopkins University, Spain has so far seen just under 240,000 confirmed cases and 27,127 deaths. Pictured: People enjoy La Malagueta beach today during the first day of Phase 2 of de-escalation due to Covid-19

According to the John Hopkins University, Spain has so far seen just under 240,000 confirmed cases and 27,127 deaths.

Last month Spain began the process of easing their lockdown measures starting with allowing one form of exercise daily.

The Spanish government divided the allowed exercise into a rota system where people had to go out between 6am and 10am or 8pm to 11pm.

Those aged 70 or over had to wait until between 10am and midday or 7pm and 8pm.

Some parts of Spain also introduced social distancing measures on their beaches which used roped off areas to keep people at a safe distance from each other. 

The system of roped-off boxes that allows people to enjoy their beaches but at a reduced capacity.

Brendan Cole frolics on the beach with wife Zoe and their children


Brendan Cole hits the beach with wife Zoe and children Aurelia, 7, and Dante, 2, as family remain in Mallorca after Spanish lockdown is eased

Brendan Cole’s extended family holiday on the island of Mallorca continued on Sunday as the former Strictly Come Dancing professional visited a local beach with his loved ones.

The 43-year old remains on the Spanish island with wife Zoe and their two children, daughter Aurelia, seven, and son Dante, two, as Spain eases itself away from strict lockdown policies in the fight against coronavirus COVID-19.

But despite the context Cole, who owns a holiday home on the island, appeared to be in high spirits as he relaxed with his family over the weekend.

Good times: Brendan Cole’s extended family holiday on the island of Mallorca continued on Sunday as the former Strictly Come Dancing professional visited a local beach with his loved ones

Sporting a pair of blue shorts, the shirtless ballroom dancer topped up his tan while building sandcastles with his children.

Joining her husband, Zoe, 37, caught the eye in a distinctive grey swimsuit as she occupied herself by taking pictures of the stunning coastal scenery.

Speaking in April, the lifestyle blogger said that while the family hadn’t been able to leave their home  due to the state’s restrictions, she hopes their kids will be able to remember this period as ‘a happy time’ rather than ‘traumatic’. 

Doting mother: Brendan's wife Zoe cradled two-year old son Dante as they made their way across the sand

Doting mother: Brendan's wife Zoe cradled two-year old son Dante as they made their way across the sand

Doting mother: Brendan’s wife Zoe cradled two-year old son Dante as they made their way across the sand

Looking good: Zoe caught the eye in a grey swimsuit during her latest appearance in Mallorca

Looking good: Zoe caught the eye in a grey swimsuit during her latest appearance in Mallorca

Outrage at Belgian prince as he catches coronavirus after attending an illegal party in Spain


Outrage at Belgium’s Prince Joachim, 28, as he catches coronavirus after flying 1050 miles to Spain to attend a party with his girlfriend and 26 others in breach of lockdown

  • Prince Joachim of Belgium attended an illegal private party in Spain on Tuesday
  • The Belgian Royal Household confirmed he has now contracted coronavirus
  • The 28-year-old was allowed to travel to Madrid for business reasons
  • But the party on Tuesday took place in the city of Cordoba in southern Spain 
  • Here’s how to help people impacted by Covid-19

A Belgian prince has been diagnosed with coronavirus just days after attending a private party in Spain which breached social distancing rules. 

Prince Joachim, the nephew of King Philippe of Belgium and ninth in line to the throne, attended the party on Tuesday in a private house in the city of Cordoba.

The prince, 28, had arrived in Madrid two days earlier for a business trip but then took a high-speed train to Cordoba, where his long-term girlfriend Victoria Ortiz grew up.

Prince Joachim of Belgium (pictured middle) has been diagnosed with coronavirus a few days after attending a private party which broke lockdown rules in Cordoba, Spain

The prince (pictured) is the nephew of King Phillipe of Belgium and is ninth in line to the throne

The prince (pictured) is the nephew of King Phillipe of Belgium and is ninth in line to the throne

The prince, 28, travelled to Madrid on a business trip on Sunday but then took a high-speed train to Cordoba (pictured) on Tuesday

The prince, 28, travelled to Madrid on a business trip on Sunday but then took a high-speed train to Cordoba (pictured) on Tuesday

According to Spanish news outlet El Pais, 27 people attended the private party, which is nearly double the number of people (15) currently allowed to congregate under one roof in the Andalusian city. 

The same news organisation says the Belgian Royal Household confirmed that Prince Joachim attended the party.

All the guests who attended the party are now in quarantine, while it is not clear whether the prince contracted the virus at the party or whether he already had the virus beforehand.  

Prince Laurent of Belgium, another of Joachim’s uncles, confirmed the virus has been contracted by at least one member of his family.

He said: ‘We do not know how, but the coronavirus has entered our household.’

In Cordoba (pictured) there is a regional social limit of just 15 people under one roof. The party was attended by 27 guests, all of whom are now in quarantine

In Cordoba (pictured) there is a regional social limit of just 15 people under one roof. The party was attended by 27 guests, all of whom are now in quarantine 

Spanish authorities confirmed on Saturday that the prince (pictured) was at the event and have branded the staging of the social occasion as 'completely irresponsible' and 'unforgivable'

Spanish authorities confirmed on Saturday that the prince (pictured) was at the event and have branded the staging of the social occasion as ‘completely irresponsible’ and ‘unforgivable’

‘For weeks now, we have hardly gone out – only to shop and for sports.’ 

The party has been branded as ‘completely irresponsible’ by Spanish authorities, with police in the country investigating the party.

Those found guilty of breaking lockdown restrictions could face fines of between 600 and 10,000 euros. 

Speaking about the party, Rafaela Valenzuela, the Spanish government’s sub-delegate in Cordoba, said: ‘I feel surprised and indignant, given that at a moment of national mourning for so many dead, an incident of this type stands out. 

‘It’s completely irresponsible, because that number of people multiplied could cause an outbreak, and that would mean that Córdoba, after passing to Phase 2, would have to take a step back.

‘That is unforgivable. The police are investigating not just the observance of confinement measures, but also the breaking of other rules, given that we are still under a state of alarm. The virus is still out there.’

Outrage at Belgian prince as he catches coronavirus after attending an illegal party in Spain


Outrage at Belgium’s Prince Joachim, 28, as he catches coronavirus after flying 1050 miles to Spain to attend a party with his girlfriend and 26 others in breach of lockdown

  • Prince Joachim of Belgium attended an illegal private party in Spain on Tuesday
  • The Belgian Royal Household confirmed he has now contracted coronavirus
  • The 28-year-old was allowed to travel to Madrid for business reasons
  • But the party on Tuesday took place in the city of Cordoba in southern Spain 
  • Here’s how to help people impacted by Covid-19

A Belgian prince has been diagnosed with coronavirus just days after attending a private party in Spain which breached social distancing rules. 

Prince Joachim, the nephew of King Philippe of Belgium and ninth in line to the throne, attended the party on Tuesday in a private house in the city of Cordoba.

The prince, 28, had arrived in Madrid two days earlier for a business trip but then took a high-speed train to Cordoba, where his long-term girlfriend Victoria Ortiz grew up.

Prince Joachim of Belgium (pictured middle) has been diagnosed with coronavirus a few days after attending a private party which broke lockdown rules in Cordoba, Spain

The prince (pictured) is the nephew of King Phillipe of Belgium and is ninth in line to the throne

The prince (pictured) is the nephew of King Phillipe of Belgium and is ninth in line to the throne

The prince, 28, travelled to Madrid on a business trip on Sunday but then took a high-speed train to Cordoba (pictured) on Tuesday

The prince, 28, travelled to Madrid on a business trip on Sunday but then took a high-speed train to Cordoba (pictured) on Tuesday

According to Spanish news outlet El Pais, 27 people attended the private party, which is nearly double the number of people (15) currently allowed to congregate under one roof in the Andalusian city. 

The same news organisation says the Belgian Royal Household confirmed that Prince Joachim attended the party.

All the guests who attended the party are now in quarantine, while it is not clear whether the prince contracted the virus at the party or whether he already had the virus beforehand.  

Prince Laurent of Belgium, another of Joachim’s uncles, confirmed the virus has been contracted by at least one member of his family.

He said: ‘We do not know how, but the coronavirus has entered our household.’

In Cordoba (pictured) there is a regional social limit of just 15 people under one roof. The party was attended by 27 guests, all of whom are now in quarantine

In Cordoba (pictured) there is a regional social limit of just 15 people under one roof. The party was attended by 27 guests, all of whom are now in quarantine 

Spanish authorities confirmed on Saturday that the prince (pictured) was at the event and have branded the staging of the social occasion as 'completely irresponsible' and 'unforgivable'

Spanish authorities confirmed on Saturday that the prince (pictured) was at the event and have branded the staging of the social occasion as ‘completely irresponsible’ and ‘unforgivable’

‘For weeks now, we have hardly gone out – only to shop and for sports.’ 

The party has been branded as ‘completely irresponsible’ by Spanish authorities, with police in the country investigating the party.

Those found guilty of breaking lockdown restrictions could face fines of between 600 and 10,000 euros. 

Speaking about the party, Rafaela Valenzuela, the Spanish government’s sub-delegate in Cordoba, said: ‘I feel surprised and indignant, given that at a moment of national mourning for so many dead, an incident of this type stands out. 

‘It’s completely irresponsible, because that number of people multiplied could cause an outbreak, and that would mean that Córdoba, after passing to Phase 2, would have to take a step back.

‘That is unforgivable. The police are investigating not just the observance of confinement measures, but also the breaking of other rules, given that we are still under a state of alarm. The virus is still out there.’

Tourists to be tested and isolated for six hours in Mallorca and Ibiza


The first tourists to arrive in Mallorca will undergo PCR coronavirus tests at the airport and then remain isolated for six hours in their hotels to await the results.

This is one of the measures contained in a pilot ‘action plan’ being prepared by the Balearic government which wants to be one of the first regions in Spain to receive holidaymakers.

It is planned to test-drive the new procedures in mid-June if permission is given to bring up to 5,000 Germans to Mallorca as a prelude to the opening of international borders and the scrapping of Spain’s 14-day quarantine rule from July 1st.

The first tourists to arrive in Mallorca will undergo PCR coronavirus tests at the airport and then remain isolated for six hours in their hotels to await the results. Pictured: A passenger arriving in Adolfo Suarez Madrid-Barajas Airport last week

People sunbathe and children play in the water in Mallorca, Spain, as the country partially eases lockdown restrictions 

A pilot ‘action plan’ to welcome back tourists is being prepared by the Balearic government which wants to be one of the first regions in Spain to receive holidaymakers. Pictured: Travellers arriving into Valencia airport

According to reports in the island’s press, the go-ahead has already been given by both the Ministry of Tourism and Ministry of Transport but approval is still pending from the Ministeries of Labour and Health.

The Balearics, which include Mallorca, Menorca and Ibiza, have a low incidence of coronavirus deaths at 224 since the outbreak of the crisis and just over 2,000 infections. As a result, the local government wants the islands to be treated as one of the world leaders in dealing with the aftermath of COVID-19 and how to cope with international tourism again in the safest way possible.

‘The pilot plan aims to demonstrate that it is possible to allow the subsequent entry of tourists without risk into the islands from July 1st, the date on which the summer season is to start more generally, hence the inclusion of tests for detection of the disease on arrival at the islands,’ says Diario de Mallorca.

Four hotels in Mallorca have offered to take the German visitors from June 16 to 30. Two of them are in Platja de Palma and two in Alcúdia. It is hoped to have another one Menorca, another in Ibiza and a third in Formentera.

Son Sant Joan's Airport in Palma de Mallorca is nearly deserted on April 30, 2020

Son Sant Joan’s Airport in Palma de Mallorca is nearly deserted on April 30, 2020

The Balearics, which include Mallorca, Menorca and Ibiza, have a low incidence of coronavirus deaths at 224 since the outbreak of the crisis and just over 2,000 infections. Pictured: Ibiza airport

The Balearics, which include Mallorca, Menorca and Ibiza, have a low incidence of coronavirus deaths at 224 since the outbreak of the crisis and just over 2,000 infections. Pictured: Ibiza airport

Originally, it was thought about 3,000 Germans would take part in the experiment which will also test all the coronavirus protocols, from arriving at the airport, transfers to hotels, the accommodation itself, arrangements around the swimming pools, use of the facilities, trips out and their eventual return.

According to Diario de Mallorca, that figure could now increase to 4,000 for Mallorca, 500 in Menorca, 500 in Ibiza and 100 in Formentera. The latter island is considerably ahead of other Spanish regions in the de-escalation period as it has always been one phase ahead, together with three of the Canary islands. Again, this is due to the low incidence of coronavirus.

President of the Hotel Federation of Mallorca, María Frontera said the pilot test was essential to demonstrate that the Balearic Islands are a safe destination.

Pictured: Hotels and bars on the beach in Ibiza

Pictured: A general view of the Iberostar Grand Hotel Portals Nous hotel in Majorca, Spain

Four hotels in Mallorca have offered to take the German visitors from June 16 to 30. Two of them are in Platja de Palma and two in Alcúdia. It is hoped to have another one Menorca, another in Ibiza and a third in Formentera. Pictured left: Hotels and bars on the beach in Ibiza. Pictured right: A general view of the Iberostar Grand Hotel Portals Nous hotel in Majorca, Spain

It is hoped it will help pave the way for other international tourists, including from Britain when travel is allowed.  

This comes after Spanish PM Pedro Sanchez put the UK at the top of his list of target countries in talks aimed at reaching bilateral ‘safe corridor’ swaps. 

Spain has quarantined all international arrivals for 14 days since May 14 but recently announced that the country would open for tourism from July 1.  

There has been debate over whether Britons should be allowed to holiday in Spain  after the Home Secretary Priti Patel’s announcements that anyone who arrives into the UK after June 8, including returning Britons, will have to self-isolate for 14 days or face fines of £1,000. 

The travel industry also lambasted the rules, labelling them as ‘ineffective and unenforceable’ given that those travelling to the UK from Ireland were exempt from the rules.

It means flyers can first travel into Dublin and then either jet into the UK or get a bus across the border with Northern Ireland, avoiding the self-isolating rules.  

Spain has proposed restarting travel between European zones where coronavirus has been brought under control as a way to save the summer tourist season.

The plan would see Europe divided into zones which would then be coded ‘green’ or ‘red’ depending on whether the virus has been brought under control locally. 

The green zones would then be joined to form a network with travel allowed freely between them - even if they are in different countries.  Travel in the red zones would be restricted to all-but essential journeys

The green zones would then be joined to form a network with travel allowed freely between them – even if they are in different countries.  Travel in the red zones would be restricted to all-but essential journeys

Tourists to be tested and isolated for six hours in Mallorca and Ibiza


The first tourists to arrive in Mallorca will undergo PCR coronavirus tests at the airport and then remain isolated for six hours in their hotels to await the results.

This is one of the measures contained in a pilot ‘action plan’ being prepared by the Balearic government which wants to be one of the first regions in Spain to receive holidaymakers.

It is planned to test-drive the new procedures in mid-June if permission is given to bring up to 5,000 Germans to Mallorca as a prelude to the opening of international borders and the scrapping of Spain’s 14-day quarantine rule from July 1st.

Tourists arriving in Mallorca will be tested for coronavirus and then isolated for six hours while they wait for results. Pictured: Son Sant Joan’s Airport in Palma de Mallorca taken on April 30, 2020

The Balearic government is test-driving this plan in mid-June by bringing 5,000 Germans to try and show that it is safe to allow tourists to holiday from July 1 without isolating for 14 days/ Pictured: File photo of the harbour of Port d'Andratx on the Balearic island of Majorca

The Balearic government is test-driving this plan in mid-June by bringing 5,000 Germans to try and show that it is safe to allow tourists to holiday from July 1 without isolating for 14 days/ Pictured: File photo of the harbour of Port d’Andratx on the Balearic island of Majorca

According to reports in the island’s press, the go-ahead has already been given by both the Ministry of Tourism and Ministry of Transport but approval is still pending from the Ministeries of Labour and Health.

The Balearics, which include Mallorca, Menorca and Ibiza, have a low incidence of coronavirus deaths at 224 since the outbreak of the crisis and just over 2,000 infections. As a result, the local government wants the islands to be treated as one of the world leaders in dealing with the aftermath of COVID-19 and how to cope with international tourism again in the safest way possible.

‘The pilot plan aims to demonstrate that it is possible to allow the subsequent entry of tourists without risk into the islands from July 1st, the date on which the summer season is to start more generally, hence the inclusion of tests for detection of the disease on arrival at the islands,’ says Diario de Mallorca.

Four hotels in Mallorca have offered to take the German visitors from June 16 to 30. Two of them are in Platja de Palma and two in Alcúdia. It is hoped to have another one Menorca, another in Ibiza and a third in Formentera.

The Balearics, which include Mallorca, Menorca and Ibiza, have a low incidence of coronavirus deaths at 224 since the outbreak of the crisis and just over 2,000 infections. Pictured: Ibiza airport

The Balearics, which include Mallorca, Menorca and Ibiza, have a low incidence of coronavirus deaths at 224 since the outbreak of the crisis and just over 2,000 infections. Pictured: Ibiza airport

Originally, it was thought about 3,000 Germans would take part in the experiment which will also test all the coronavirus protocols, from arriving at the airport, transfers to hotels, the accommodation itself, arrangements around the swimming pools, use of the facilities, trips out and their eventual return.

According to Diario de Mallorca, that figure could now increase to 4,000 for Mallorca, 500 in Menorca, 500 in Ibiza and 100 in Formentera. The latter island is considerably ahead of other Spanish regions in the de-escalation period as it has always been one phase ahead, together with three of the Canary islands. Again, this is due to the low incidence of coronavirus.

President of the Hotel Federation of Mallorca, María Frontera said the pilot test was essential to demonstrate that the Balearic Islands are a safe destination.

Pictured: Hotels and bars on the beach in Ibiza

Pictured: A general view of the Iberostar Grand Hotel Portals Nous hotel in Majorca, Spain

Four hotels in Mallorca have offered to take the German visitors from June 16 to 30. Two of them are in Platja de Palma and two in Alcúdia. It is hoped to have another one Menorca, another in Ibiza and a third in Formentera. Pictured left: Hotels and bars on the beach in Ibiza. Pictured right: A general view of the Iberostar Grand Hotel Portals Nous hotel in Majorca, Spain

It is hoped it will help pave the way for other international tourists, including from Britain when travel is allowed.  

This comes after Spanish PM Pedro Sanchez put the UK at the top of his list of target countries in talks aimed at reaching bilateral ‘safe corridor’ swaps. 

Spain has quarantined all international arrivals for 14 days since May 14 but recently announced that the country would open for tourism from July 1.  

There has been debate over whether Britons should be allowed to holiday in Spain  after the Home Secretary Priti Patel’s announcements that anyone who arrives into the UK after June 8, including returning Britons, will have to self-isolate for 14 days or face fines of £1,000. 

The travel industry also lambasted the rules, labelling them as ‘ineffective and unenforceable’ given that those travelling to the UK from Ireland were exempt from the rules.

It means flyers can first travel into Dublin and then either jet into the UK or get a bus across the border with Northern Ireland, avoiding the self-isolating rules.  

Spain has proposed restarting travel between European zones where coronavirus has been brought under control as a way to save the summer tourist season.

The plan would see Europe divided into zones which would then be coded ‘green’ or ‘red’ depending on whether the virus has been brought under control locally. 

The green zones would then be joined to form a network with travel allowed freely between them - even if they are in different countries.  Travel in the red zones would be restricted to all-but essential journeys

The green zones would then be joined to form a network with travel allowed freely between them – even if they are in different countries.  Travel in the red zones would be restricted to all-but essential journeys