Texas dog groomer bursts into tears as she is gifted a new puppy

Heartwarming moment dog groomer bursts into tears of joy as she is gifted a new puppy after her last pet died when he was hit by a car

  •  Vikki Sapp, 51, surprised with a puppy at dog salon she works at in Waco, Texas
  •  Coworker Heather Hodges, 26, decided to give her the sweet puppy as a gift
  •  Ms Sapp lost her last dog, Diego, after it escaped her yard and was hit by a car
  • After their heartwarming introduction, she has named the new puppy Layla 

A dog groomer let out a loud yell and burst into tears of joy when her coworker surprised her with a new puppy after her last dog was hit by a car. 

Vikki Sapp’s previous dog, Diego, died after he escaped from her yard in February and was sadly run over. 

The 51-year-old had been mourning the loss of her dog for months before her  coworker Heather Hodges, 26, decided to bring some canine joy into her life at their dog salon in Waco, Texas. 

The dog lover bursts into tears as she realises the dog is for her

Vikki Sapp, 51, yelled as she discovered the puppy she had been grooming at a dog salon in Waco, Texas, was a gift for her

In the heartwarming video, Ms Sapp’s colleagues present her with a take-home bag of treats while she is grooming a little white dog and confused she says: ‘I don’t have a dog yet?’

Suddenly she figures out their plan and points at the fluffy animal and shouts ‘NO’ with her hands over her mouth in shock.  

She begins to sob and the sweet puppy wags its tail and looks at her concerned before jumping into her arms. 

Ms Hodges had known for around four years that Ms Sapp liked Maltese dogs, Shih Tzus and Yorkies, and on May 19 received a call from a friend to ask if anyone was looking to adopt a dog. 

Thinking of her friend, she decided to give the beautiful puppy to Ms Sapp and the following morning Heather’s friend dropped the pooch off at the salon.

Ms Sapp was told the owner had said to give the dog whatever fur trim she felt would make it look pretty and for hours she talked about how beautiful the dog looked and how she wanted to take her home. 

The dog lover has since named the dog Layla, and after Ms Hodges shared the video online, the pair received an outpouring of support.

She said: ‘I was anxious, nervous, excited – I didn’t know what to do with myself there were so many times I wanted to run in there to tell her.

The sweet white puppy looks at her concerned before Ms Sapp and jumps into Ms Sapp's arms

Ms Sapp was left confused when her colleagues handed her a bag of take-home treats

The sweet white puppy, which was organised as a gift by Heather Hodges, 26, looks at Ms Sapp concerned before jumping into her arms

‘I’m not an openly emotional person so the second she realized what was going on I erupted with tears.

‘My heart was singing with joy because I finally got to do something for someone that is so special to us.

‘I wanted people to see that not all is bad and that anyone can bring joy to someone’s life.

‘While the message was great and everything went so smoothly, we do not encourage people to use animals as gifts.

‘It is a financial and personal decision that people need to make on their own.’

Texas dog groomer bursts into tears as she is gifted a new puppy

Heartwarming moment dog groomer bursts into tears of joy as she is gifted a new puppy after her last pet died when he was hit by a car

  •  Vikki Sapp, 51, surprised with a puppy at dog salon she works at in Waco, Texas
  •  Coworker Heather Hodges, 26, decided to give her the sweet puppy as a gift
  •  Ms Sapp lost her last dog, Diego, after it escaped her yard and was hit by a car
  • After their heartwarming introduction, she has named the new puppy Layla 

A dog groomer let out a loud yell and burst into tears of joy when her coworker surprised her with a new puppy after her last dog was hit by a car. 

Vikki Sapp’s previous dog, Diego, died after he escaped from her yard in February and was sadly run over. 

The 51-year-old had been mourning the loss of her dog for months before her  coworker Heather Hodges, 26, decided to bring some canine joy into her life at their dog salon in Waco, Texas. 

The dog lover bursts into tears as she realises the dog is for her

Vikki Sapp, 51, yelled as she discovered the puppy she had been grooming at a dog salon in Waco, Texas, was a gift for her

In the heartwarming video, Ms Sapp’s colleagues present her with a take-home bag of treats while she is grooming a little white dog and confused she says: ‘I don’t have a dog yet?’

Suddenly she figures out their plan and points at the fluffy animal and shouts ‘NO’ with her hands over her mouth in shock.  

She begins to sob and the sweet puppy wags its tail and looks at her concerned before jumping into her arms. 

Ms Hodges had known for around four years that Ms Sapp liked Maltese dogs, Shih Tzus and Yorkies, and on May 19 received a call from a friend to ask if anyone was looking to adopt a dog. 

Thinking of her friend, she decided to give the beautiful puppy to Ms Sapp and the following morning Heather’s friend dropped the pooch off at the salon.

Ms Sapp was told the owner had said to give the dog whatever fur trim she felt would make it look pretty and for hours she talked about how beautiful the dog looked and how she wanted to take her home. 

The dog lover has since named the dog Layla, and after Ms Hodges shared the video online, the pair received an outpouring of support.

She said: ‘I was anxious, nervous, excited – I didn’t know what to do with myself there were so many times I wanted to run in there to tell her.

The sweet white puppy looks at her concerned before Ms Sapp and jumps into Ms Sapp's arms

Ms Sapp was left confused when her colleagues handed her a bag of take-home treats

The sweet white puppy, which was organised as a gift by Heather Hodges, 26, looks at Ms Sapp concerned before jumping into her arms

‘I’m not an openly emotional person so the second she realized what was going on I erupted with tears.

‘My heart was singing with joy because I finally got to do something for someone that is so special to us.

‘I wanted people to see that not all is bad and that anyone can bring joy to someone’s life.

‘While the message was great and everything went so smoothly, we do not encourage people to use animals as gifts.

‘It is a financial and personal decision that people need to make on their own.’

Mother-of-three has a better body at 52 than she did at 20

A mother who says she is in better shape at 52 than she ever has been says that she is flooded with messages from both men and women asking how she maintains such youthful looks.    

Certified fitness trainer and healthy lifestyle and nutrition coach, Lori Vick, 52, from Mineola, Texas, has always been naturally athletic and a keen runner, running seven marathons and countless half marathons between 2010 and 2014.

Lori, who is mom to three children, Lexi, 25, Logan, 19, and Lawson, 17, has been a fitness trainer for more than 30 years, however, in 2014 she fancied a change and decided to give competitive bodybuilding a try as she was interested to find out how switching up her diet and training could sculpt her physique.

Transformed: Mother-of-three Lori Vick has revealed how she completely transformed her figure to get in better shape at 52 (pictured) than she ever was in her 20s and 30s

Transformed: Mother-of-three Lori Vick has revealed how she completely transformed her figure to get in better shape at 52 (right) than she ever was in her 20s and 30s (left) 

Impressive: The 52-year-old Texas native says she is regularly inundated with social media messages from both men and women asking her for her secrets

Impressive: The 52-year-old Texas native says she is regularly inundated with social media messages from both men and women asking her for her secrets

Changes: Lori has been a fitness trainer for more than 30 years so she has always been in shape, but in 2014 she took up bodybuilding which has completely changed her body

Changes: Lori has been a fitness trainer for more than 30 years so she has always been in shape, but in 2014 she took up bodybuilding which has completely changed her body

Changes: Lori has been a fitness trainer for more than 30 years so she has always been in shape, but in 2014 she took up bodybuilding which has completely changed her body

Family first: The proud mom, pictured with her family before her transformation, wanted to change up her workout routine when she took up bodybuilding

Family first: The proud mom, pictured with her family before her transformation, wanted to change up her workout routine when she took up bodybuilding 

Since then, Lori has competed in several bodybuilding competitions at a national level, placing first and second over the years. Lori’s incredible figure means that she has become a fitness bikini model and takes part in regular photoshoots showcasing her enviable physique and hard work – her goal is to still be bikini modelling when she is 60.

Lori’s incredible figure is the result of years of consistency and hard work which sees her train between five to six days a week which she fuels through eating ‘super clean’ which means Lori never eats fast food, or foods with chemicals in them, she eats gluten free and an 80 per cent plant based diet.

Despite being in the shape of her life at 52 and having people mistake her for being decades younger than she is, Lori, who believes that it is never too late for someone to reinvent themselves, says she will never take her health and fitness for granted.

‘What has worked for me over a lifetime of fitness has been the three Ds – discipline, determination and dedication,’ said Lori.

‘I have a lot of self-discipline when it comes to my own fitness. I am very determined in everything I do, if I set my mind on something I go “all in”.

‘I have had a strong calling from within to be dedicated to a thing – fitness – that has always given more than it has taken from me. It is for this reason I have always chosen to never give up.

‘I truly love everything about fitness, but if I had to choose [one thing I love the most] I’d say I love the idea of constant change if we are willing to do what it takes to achieve it.

‘Fitness gives me a daily pattern for my life, every single day, even when times are difficult, I still know I can rely on fitness in my life.

‘I have always been very naturally athletic so it [fitness] came much easier to me than most. As I have gotten older it is no longer ‘easier’ for me.

‘I have fought and overcome much – as most humans have at this age – and I believe it is a good thing too because it is for this reason I am so grateful for every single aspect of my health and fitness and performance as an athlete at 52. 

Keep it up! Lori admits that maintaining her youthful figure is not easy, and she trains between five and six times a week

Keep it up! Lori admits that maintaining her youthful figure is not easy, and she trains between five and six times a week 

Success: However that dedication has helped her to carve out a career as a bikini model - which she hopes to keep doing into her 60s

Success: However that dedication has helped her to carve out a career as a bikini model - which she hopes to keep doing into her 60s

Success: However that dedication has helped her to carve out a career as a bikini model – which she hopes to keep doing into her 60s

Expertise: 'What has worked for me over a lifetime of fitness has been the three Ds - discipline, determination and dedication,' Lori said

Expertise: ‘What has worked for me over a lifetime of fitness has been the three Ds – discipline, determination and dedication,’ Lori said

Routine: Lori, picture left as a child and right with her 19-year-old son Logan as a baby, says that her diet is key to maintaining her figure

Routine: Lori, picture left as a child and right with her 19-year-old son Logan as a baby, says that her diet is key to maintaining her figure

Routine: Lori, picture left as a child and right with her 19-year-old son Logan as a baby, says that her diet is key to maintaining her figure

‘I am very confident now, but I consider myself humble in a healthy way so I take not one single day for granted, every time I am able to go out for a run with the sun shining on my face I am grateful. 

‘So my initial goal when I began bodybuilding was always to become a fitness model. I absolutely love modelling.

‘I love choosing outfits and shoes and making amazing images. When I’m shooting photos I forget anything else exists for that brief time. I also love that modelling has really helped me connect with myself.

‘I have really made an effort to create photos in several physique styles, some are immediately following or preceding a competition, but many photoshoots I have done are just me in my “walk-around” physique.

‘This helps me be more accepting of and celebrate myself wherever I am in my process.

‘It helps me share with my clients and followers how I actually live whereas competition photos are not a lifestyle captured but rather just a moment that won’t really be recreated again unless and until there is another competition. I would love to do bikini modelling at age 60.’

Lori is an all-natural athlete and has never used steroids to achieve her physique.

A typical day of training for Lori when she is at her peak consists of an early morning fasted cardio run of up to seven miles, followed by a protein rich meal and an hour of weight lifting, followed by further cardio either on her road bike or on a StairMaster machine or treadmill.

Lori’s sensational modelling pictures garner a lot of attention on social media and she is frequently inundated with messages from men and women complimenting her on her figure and asking her for tips on how they can achieve similar results, the secret to which she says is in her diet.

‘I would say super clean, and I mean super clean eating is everything at age 52 to maintaining the physique I have,’ she said. 

Strict: The bodybuilding pro, pictured at a competition, doesn't eat any fast food, and she maintains a gluten-free diet, while also ensuring that 80 per cent of her meals are plant-based

Strict: The bodybuilding pro, pictured at a competition, doesn’t eat any fast food, and she maintains a gluten-free diet, while also ensuring that 80 per cent of her meals are plant-based 

Special: 'I never eat like the majority of the people. Eating "regular" food simply does not serve me well,' she said

Special: ‘I never eat like the majority of the people. Eating “regular” food simply does not serve me well,’ she said

asdaStrike a pose: Lori began bodybuilding with the aim of changing her body - and also in order to open doors to the modeling industry

Strike a pose: Lori began bodybuilding with the aim of changing her body - and also in order to open doors to the modeling industry

Strike a pose: Lori began bodybuilding with the aim of changing her body – and also in order to open doors to the modeling industry

Work it: She says she loves every aspect of modeling, from picking out clothes and shoes to posing in front of the camera

Work it: She says she loves every aspect of modeling, from picking out clothes and shoes to posing in front of the camera 

Rigorous: A typical morning for Lori consists of an early morning fasted cardio run of up to seven miles, followed by a protein rich meal and an hour of weight lifting

Rigorous: A typical morning for Lori consists of an early morning fasted cardio run of up to seven miles, followed by a protein rich meal and an hour of weight lifting

Rigorous: A typical morning for Lori consists of an early morning fasted cardio run of up to seven miles, followed by a protein rich meal and an hour of weight lifting

‘I never eat like the majority of the people. Eating “regular” food simply does not serve me well either in performing the way I choose to or in looking the way I want to. 

‘Showing discipline when I eat. Although I eat super clean it is still possible to eat too much clean food.

‘It is required after all that I eat a certain amount of calories – and not more than that – in order to maintain a certain level of lean mass. It is a balancing act between eating to perform and eating to stay lean. I am always looking to improve.

‘I find most of the messages I receive are positive and complimentary, not inappropriate. I try to handle each one on a case by case basis, but I really try to respond or at least acknowledge each message I receive.

‘I appreciate the people who follow my journey and take the time to reach out to me.

‘For the most part people are intrigued that I am 52 thinking I am younger. But I will say that at age 52 it requires a lot more self-care than at younger ages so it is a constant effort to maintain a healthy appearance.’

Finally, Lori shared her words of advice to others.

‘I offer remote nutrition and fitness coaching so I would say people should contact me and I can help them reach their goals,’ she said.

‘We can accomplish a lot in just 30 days. As far as someone who wants to reinvent themselves in their fifties, I’d say wholeheartedly to go for it.

‘We should be reinventing on some level until we’re done living. We definitely all have to go out sometime, but I for one am certainly not going down without a fight.’

Mother-of-three has a better body at 52 than she did at 20

A mother who says she is in better shape at 52 than she ever has been says that she is flooded with messages from both men and women asking how she maintains such youthful looks.    

Certified fitness trainer and healthy lifestyle and nutrition coach, Lori Vick, 52, from Mineola, Texas, has always been naturally athletic and a keen runner, running seven marathons and countless half marathons between 2010 and 2014.

Lori, who is mom to three children, Lexi, 25, Logan, 19, and Lawson, 17, has been a fitness trainer for more than 30 years, however, in 2014 she fancied a change and decided to give competitive bodybuilding a try as she was interested to find out how switching up her diet and training could sculpt her physique.

Transformed: Mother-of-three Lori Vick has revealed how she completely transformed her figure to get in better shape at 52 (pictured) than she ever was in her 20s and 30s

Transformed: Mother-of-three Lori Vick has revealed how she completely transformed her figure to get in better shape at 52 (right) than she ever was in her 20s and 30s (left) 

Impressive: The 52-year-old Texas native says she is regularly inundated with social media messages from both men and women asking her for her secrets

Impressive: The 52-year-old Texas native says she is regularly inundated with social media messages from both men and women asking her for her secrets

Changes: Lori has been a fitness trainer for more than 30 years so she has always been in shape, but in 2014 she took up bodybuilding which has completely changed her body

Changes: Lori has been a fitness trainer for more than 30 years so she has always been in shape, but in 2014 she took up bodybuilding which has completely changed her body

Changes: Lori has been a fitness trainer for more than 30 years so she has always been in shape, but in 2014 she took up bodybuilding which has completely changed her body

Family first: The proud mom, pictured with her family before her transformation, wanted to change up her workout routine when she took up bodybuilding

Family first: The proud mom, pictured with her family before her transformation, wanted to change up her workout routine when she took up bodybuilding 

Since then, Lori has competed in several bodybuilding competitions at a national level, placing first and second over the years. Lori’s incredible figure means that she has become a fitness bikini model and takes part in regular photoshoots showcasing her enviable physique and hard work – her goal is to still be bikini modelling when she is 60.

Lori’s incredible figure is the result of years of consistency and hard work which sees her train between five to six days a week which she fuels through eating ‘super clean’ which means Lori never eats fast food, or foods with chemicals in them, she eats gluten free and an 80 per cent plant based diet.

Despite being in the shape of her life at 52 and having people mistake her for being decades younger than she is, Lori, who believes that it is never too late for someone to reinvent themselves, says she will never take her health and fitness for granted.

‘What has worked for me over a lifetime of fitness has been the three Ds – discipline, determination and dedication,’ said Lori.

‘I have a lot of self-discipline when it comes to my own fitness. I am very determined in everything I do, if I set my mind on something I go “all in”.

‘I have had a strong calling from within to be dedicated to a thing – fitness – that has always given more than it has taken from me. It is for this reason I have always chosen to never give up.

‘I truly love everything about fitness, but if I had to choose [one thing I love the most] I’d say I love the idea of constant change if we are willing to do what it takes to achieve it.

‘Fitness gives me a daily pattern for my life, every single day, even when times are difficult, I still know I can rely on fitness in my life.

‘I have always been very naturally athletic so it [fitness] came much easier to me than most. As I have gotten older it is no longer ‘easier’ for me.

‘I have fought and overcome much – as most humans have at this age – and I believe it is a good thing too because it is for this reason I am so grateful for every single aspect of my health and fitness and performance as an athlete at 52. 

Keep it up! Lori admits that maintaining her youthful figure is not easy, and she trains between five and six times a week

Keep it up! Lori admits that maintaining her youthful figure is not easy, and she trains between five and six times a week 

Success: However that dedication has helped her to carve out a career as a bikini model - which she hopes to keep doing into her 60s

Success: However that dedication has helped her to carve out a career as a bikini model - which she hopes to keep doing into her 60s

Success: However that dedication has helped her to carve out a career as a bikini model – which she hopes to keep doing into her 60s

Expertise: 'What has worked for me over a lifetime of fitness has been the three Ds - discipline, determination and dedication,' Lori said

Expertise: ‘What has worked for me over a lifetime of fitness has been the three Ds – discipline, determination and dedication,’ Lori said

Routine: Lori, picture left as a child and right with her 19-year-old son Logan as a baby, says that her diet is key to maintaining her figure

Routine: Lori, picture left as a child and right with her 19-year-old son Logan as a baby, says that her diet is key to maintaining her figure

Routine: Lori, picture left as a child and right with her 19-year-old son Logan as a baby, says that her diet is key to maintaining her figure

‘I am very confident now, but I consider myself humble in a healthy way so I take not one single day for granted, every time I am able to go out for a run with the sun shining on my face I am grateful. 

‘So my initial goal when I began bodybuilding was always to become a fitness model. I absolutely love modelling.

‘I love choosing outfits and shoes and making amazing images. When I’m shooting photos I forget anything else exists for that brief time. I also love that modelling has really helped me connect with myself.

‘I have really made an effort to create photos in several physique styles, some are immediately following or preceding a competition, but many photoshoots I have done are just me in my “walk-around” physique.

‘This helps me be more accepting of and celebrate myself wherever I am in my process.

‘It helps me share with my clients and followers how I actually live whereas competition photos are not a lifestyle captured but rather just a moment that won’t really be recreated again unless and until there is another competition. I would love to do bikini modelling at age 60.’

Lori is an all-natural athlete and has never used steroids to achieve her physique.

A typical day of training for Lori when she is at her peak consists of an early morning fasted cardio run of up to seven miles, followed by a protein rich meal and an hour of weight lifting, followed by further cardio either on her road bike or on a StairMaster machine or treadmill.

Lori’s sensational modelling pictures garner a lot of attention on social media and she is frequently inundated with messages from men and women complimenting her on her figure and asking her for tips on how they can achieve similar results, the secret to which she says is in her diet.

‘I would say super clean, and I mean super clean eating is everything at age 52 to maintaining the physique I have,’ she said. 

Strict: The bodybuilding pro, pictured at a competition, doesn't eat any fast food, and she maintains a gluten-free diet, while also ensuring that 80 per cent of her meals are plant-based

Strict: The bodybuilding pro, pictured at a competition, doesn’t eat any fast food, and she maintains a gluten-free diet, while also ensuring that 80 per cent of her meals are plant-based 

Special: 'I never eat like the majority of the people. Eating "regular" food simply does not serve me well,' she said

Special: ‘I never eat like the majority of the people. Eating “regular” food simply does not serve me well,’ she said

asdaStrike a pose: Lori began bodybuilding with the aim of changing her body - and also in order to open doors to the modeling industry

Strike a pose: Lori began bodybuilding with the aim of changing her body - and also in order to open doors to the modeling industry

Strike a pose: Lori began bodybuilding with the aim of changing her body – and also in order to open doors to the modeling industry

Work it: She says she loves every aspect of modeling, from picking out clothes and shoes to posing in front of the camera

Work it: She says she loves every aspect of modeling, from picking out clothes and shoes to posing in front of the camera 

Rigorous: A typical morning for Lori consists of an early morning fasted cardio run of up to seven miles, followed by a protein rich meal and an hour of weight lifting

Rigorous: A typical morning for Lori consists of an early morning fasted cardio run of up to seven miles, followed by a protein rich meal and an hour of weight lifting

Rigorous: A typical morning for Lori consists of an early morning fasted cardio run of up to seven miles, followed by a protein rich meal and an hour of weight lifting

‘I never eat like the majority of the people. Eating “regular” food simply does not serve me well either in performing the way I choose to or in looking the way I want to. 

‘Showing discipline when I eat. Although I eat super clean it is still possible to eat too much clean food.

‘It is required after all that I eat a certain amount of calories – and not more than that – in order to maintain a certain level of lean mass. It is a balancing act between eating to perform and eating to stay lean. I am always looking to improve.

‘I find most of the messages I receive are positive and complimentary, not inappropriate. I try to handle each one on a case by case basis, but I really try to respond or at least acknowledge each message I receive.

‘I appreciate the people who follow my journey and take the time to reach out to me.

‘For the most part people are intrigued that I am 52 thinking I am younger. But I will say that at age 52 it requires a lot more self-care than at younger ages so it is a constant effort to maintain a healthy appearance.’

Finally, Lori shared her words of advice to others.

‘I offer remote nutrition and fitness coaching so I would say people should contact me and I can help them reach their goals,’ she said.

‘We can accomplish a lot in just 30 days. As far as someone who wants to reinvent themselves in their fifties, I’d say wholeheartedly to go for it.

‘We should be reinventing on some level until we’re done living. We definitely all have to go out sometime, but I for one am certainly not going down without a fight.’

Coronavirus US: Death toll hits 150k as seven states set daily fatality records

America has now recorded more than 150,000 COVID-19 fatalities, reaching a grim new milestone in the coronavirus pandemic. 

On Wednesday afternoon, Johns Hopkins University confirmed that 150,034 Americans have now died from highly-contagious virus, with more than half a dozen states clocking their highest daily number of fatalities in the past 24 hours.  

American citizens now account for almost a quarter of the 662,577 coronavirus deaths recorded worldwide. 

No other country comes close to reporting as many coronavirus deaths as the US. Brazil has seen 88,539 deaths, while the United Kingdom has clocked 46,046 fatalities. 

Italy and Spain – which were both hit hard by the coronavirus in April and May – have reported less than 36,000 deaths respectively after their fatality rates sharply declined in the wake of strict stay-at-home orders. 

It’s a different case in the United States, where the death rate continues to soar, despite the country stretching into its fifth month battling the pandemic.  

Fatalities have increased by more than 10,000 since July 17, which marks the fastest increase in deaths since the US went from 100,000 to 110,000 fatal cases over 11 days in early June.

Nationally, COVID-19 deaths have risen for three weeks in a row while the number of new cases week-over-week recently fell for the first time since June.  

Overnight, seven states – Florida, California, Texas, North Carolina, Arkansas, Oregon and Montana – all reported a record spike in their fatalities. 

 

Nationally, COVID-19 deaths have risen for three weeks in a row while the number of new cases week-over-week recently fell for the first time since June

Nationally, COVID-19 deaths have risen for three weeks in a row while the number of new cases week-over-week recently fell for the first time since June

Texas leads the nation with nearly 4,000 deaths so far this month, followed by Florida with 2,690 and California with 2,500. The Texas figure includes a backlog of hundreds of deaths after the state changed the way it counted COVID-19 fatalities.

While deaths have rapidly risen in July in these three states, New York and New Jersey still lead the nation in total lives lost and for deaths per capita. 

Even though deaths are rising across the US, they remain well below levels seen in April when an average of 2,000 people a day were dying from the virus. 

Health experts have indicated the death toll may not be as bad this time around possibly because a large share of the current cases are younger people, who are less likely to die, and because of advances in treatment and knowledge of the virus. 

Deaths are a lagging indicator and can continue to rise weeks after new infections drop. A coronavirus death, when it occurs, typically comes several weeks after a person is first infected.  

Meanwhile, Texas – the second-most populous state – added more than 6,000 new cases on Monday, pushing its total to 401,477. 

Only three other states – California, Florida and New York – have more than 400,000 total cases.  

A spike in infections in Arizona, California, Florida and Texas this month has overwhelmed hospitals and put the states in a dire situation.

There are signs the virus has also been spreading farther north in recent days, causing alarm among public health officials who fear states are not doing enough to avoid catastrophic outbreaks like those seen in the Sunbelt in the past two months.   

Florida deaths

Florida cases

Florida reported its highest single day spike for COVID-19 deaths. The death toll in Florida increased by 186 on Monday, bringing the total number of deaths in the third-most populous US state to 6,117, according the state’s health department

Texas deaths

Texas cases

Texas leads the nation with nearly 4,000 deaths so far this month. The Texas figure includes a backlog of hundreds of deaths after the state changed the way it counted COVID-19 fatalities. Texas – the second-most populous state – added more than 6,000 new cases on Monday, pushing its total to 401,477

California deaths

California cases

California on Tuesday reported 171 deaths. California health officials said Latinos, who make up just over a third of the most populous U.S. state, account for 56% of COVID-19 infections and 46% of deaths

Arkansas deaths

Arkansas casess

Arkansas reported 20 new deaths on Tuesday, bringing its total to 428. The state reported 734 new cases, bringing the total to 40,181

Oregon deaths

Oregon cases

Oregon recorded a record spike of 14 new deaths on Tuesday, bringing its total to 303. The state reported 328 new cases, bringing the total to 17,416

Montana deaths

Montana cases

Montana recorded a single day spike of four new deaths on Tuesday, bringing the total death toll to 51. Cases increased by 94, bringing the total to 3,475 

Dr Anthony Fauci and Dr Deborah Birx, both White House task force members, have said there are signs the virus could be peaking in the South and West while other areas were on the cusp of new outbreaks. 

‘We are watching very carefully California, Arizona, Texas, and most of Florida,’ President Donald Trump said at a news conference on Tuesday. ‘It’s starting to head down to the right direction.’ 

The US is showing early signs that surging case numbers may be leveling out with week-over-week tallies showing infections have dropped two percent for the first time after rising steadily for five weeks. 

Infections have been surging since early June when COVID-19 started spreading rapidly throughout the Sunbelt states and the US recorded single daily highs of more than 77,000 infections. 

The seven-day average for daily infections this week is now just under 66,000. 

The downward trend in cases is prominent in the hotspot states of Florida, Texas, Arizona and California where governors and local officials rolled back reopenings to curb the infection rate. 

But even as cases start to plateau in those hard-hit states, 22 other states are currently seeing an increase in new infections. 

Cases are mostly rising in the Midwest, which public health officials say is a sign the virus is spreading north from the Sunbelt states. 

Fears are growing about the potential for a significant uptick in the Midwest, including Minnesota, Wisconsin, Ohio, Indiana and Colorado, which has been fueled largely by a rise in cases among young adults, who have been hitting bars, restaurants and health clubs again.

Republican governors in Tennessee, Mississippi, Missouri and South Carolina have all resisted calls to close bars and gyms or issue statewide mask requirements, though some local officials have imposed some of their own restrictions.

‘My reaction is that I’m disturbed. I’m disturbed by it,’ Dr Fauci said. 

Those two efforts and other best practices would help ‘prevent the resurgence that we’ve seen in some of the other Southern states.’ 

New coronavirus cases across the United States have started to decline for the first time in five weeks. The downward trend in cases is prominent in the hotspot states of Florida, Texas, Arizona and California. But even as cases start to plateau in those hard-hit states, 22 other states - mostly in the Midwest - are currently seeing an increase in new infections

New coronavirus cases across the United States have started to decline for the first time in five weeks. The downward trend in cases is prominent in the hotspot states of Florida, Texas, Arizona and California. But even as cases start to plateau in those hard-hit states, 22 other states – mostly in the Midwest – are currently seeing an increase in new infections

Over the past two weeks, Wisconsin’s rolling average number of new confirmed cases has increased by 31%. Minnesota reported its largest one-day case count Sunday, with more than 860 cases. 

In Mississippi, nine of the state’s biggest hospitals had no open intensive care beds as of Monday, and officials are considering opening pop-up facilities. More than 24% of coronavirus tests have come back positive in Mississippi over the past week, the highest rate in the nation and triple the national average. 

In Missouri, larger cities are growing rattled by a spike in cases after the state fully reopened. It reported another daily record in cases, with nearly 1,800. St. Louis is curtailing bar hours and reducing restaurant seating capacity starting Friday, and Kansas City may follow suit.

Oklahoma Gov. Kevin Stitt returned to his office Monday after two weeks of isolating at home following a positive coronavirus test. It came on the same day the state reported over 1,400 new confirmed cases – the second consecutive day of record highs. 

The rise in deaths and infections has dampened early hopes the country was past the worst of an economic crisis that has decimated businesses and put millions of Americans out of work.

The trend has fueled a bitter debate over the reopening of schools in the coming weeks. President Donald Trump and members of his administration have pushed for students to return to class, while some teachers and local officials have called for online learning.

'We are watching very carefully California, Arizona, Texas, and most of Florida,' President Donald Trump said at a news conference on Tuesday. 'It's starting to head down to the right direction.'

‘We are watching very carefully California, Arizona, Texas, and most of Florida,’ President Donald Trump said at a news conference on Tuesday. ‘It’s starting to head down to the right direction.’

‘We will fight on all fronts for the safety of students and their educators,’ Randi Weingarten, president of the American Federation of Teachers, said during the union’s virtual convention on Tuesday. ‘It’s the 11th hour; we need the resources now.’

The Texas Education Agency, the state’s overseer of public education, said it would deny funding to schools that delay in-person classes because of orders by local health authorities related to the pandemic.

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton issued guidance that health authorities cannot impose ‘blanket’ school closures for coronavirus prevention. Any such decision is up to school officials, he said.

Local health leaders in the biggest metropolitan areas in Texas, including Houston and Dallas, have recently ordered the postponement of in-person classes. 

In Washington, some Republicans in the US Senate pushed back against their own party’s $1 trillion coronavirus relief proposal the day after it was unveiled by Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, weighing on stocks.

‘I’m not for borrowing another trillion dollars,’ Republican Senator Rand Paul told reporters.

Democrats have rejected the plan as too limited compared with their $3 trillion proposal that passed the House of Representatives in May. Some Republicans called it too expensive.

Trump said on Tuesday he did not support everything in the Senate Republican coronavirus relief legislation but would not elaborate.

‘There are also things that I very much support,’ he told a White House briefing. ‘But we’ll be negotiating.’

Trump also groused about Fauci’s high approval ratings and joked ‘nobody likes me’ as he struggles to improve his standing with voters over his handling of the coronavirus pandemic.

‘It can only be my personality,’ Trump said.

Death rates fell by 64% when states closed schools early on in the pandemic, study finds as Trump pushes for K-12 classrooms to reopen

By Mary Kekatos Senior Health Reporter For Dailymail.com 

Coronavirus death rates fell when states closed schools early on in the pandemic, a new study suggests. 

Researchers found when K-12 classrooms were shut down, cases temporarily dropped by about two-thirds and deaths decreased by more than half.

But states that took action early on saw  the greatest effect, according to the team, from  Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center in Ohio,

Those that closed schools in early March, when coronavirus prevalence was low, saw 46 percent fewer infections and 17 percent fewer deaths than those that opted to close schools in late March while cases were rising quickly. 

This findings come as a debate rages in the US about whether or not schools should reopen and how to strike a balance between alleviating working parents who have to rework their schedules and preventing a potentially deadly spike come autumn.

For the study, published in JAMA, the team looked at six weeks of data collection after school closures in each state from March 9 to May 7.

All 50 states closed schools between March 13 and March 23.

Next, researchers compared closures to infection and mortality rates from COVID-19, the disease caused by the virus.

States that opted to close later, when cases were much higher, saw less of a change at around 49% per week  and 53% in deaths (above)

States that opted to close later, when cases were much higher, saw less of a change at around 49% per week  and 53% in deaths (above)

Results showed that, overall, shutting downs schools was linked to a significant decline in cases of the virus, with a drop of about 62 percent each week.    

It was also linked to decreases in deaths, with a change of about 58 percent per week.

The team estimates school closures were linked to 1.37 million fewer cases of the virus over a 26-day period and 40,600 fewer deaths over a 16-day period. 

However, it was states that closed early, when the increasing incidence of COVID-19 was at its lowest that saw the greatest decline per week at around 72 percent for cases and 64 percent for deaths. 

States that were slowest to close schools and had the highest incidence of cases, show saw a change of about 49 percent per week and 53 percent of deaths.

That’s a difference of more than 46 percent for cases and 17 percent for deaths.

This means closing schools early was linked to 128.7 fewer cases per 100,000 over 26 days and with 1.5 fewer deaths per 100,000 over 16 days.  

‘States that closed schools earlier, when cumulative incidence of COVID-19 was low, had the largest relative reduction in incidence and mortality,’ the authors wrote.

‘However, it remains possible that some of the reduction may have been related to other concurrent nonpharmaceutical interventions.’   

This includes interventions such as stay-at-home orders, restaurant closures and increased handwashing. 

Coronavirus US: Cases in Texas nursing homes DOUBLED in July

Nursing homes with higher rates of deficiencies and complaints were more likely to report cases of the novel coronavirus, a new study suggests.

Researchers found nursing homes without cases had 20% fewer deficiencies – such as lack of infection control programs, improper medication handling and fire hazard risks – than facilities that did have cases.

Additionally, nursing homes reporting COVID-19 cases had more complaints for not meeting federal regulations, including for staffing, poor health care and resident injures, filed with the state’s Department of Health than facilities reporting no cases.  

Facilities with reported cases also had a higher average of Medicaid-insured residents than facilities that did not, the team from Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania says.

It comes as COVID-19 infections in Texas nursing homes more than doubled in July and deaths continue to tick up.

Nursing homes without cases had 20% fewer deficiencies – such as lack of infection control programs – than facilities that did have cases. Pictured:  Lori Spencer (left) and her husband Michael Spencer (right) visits Lori’s mom Judie Shape, 81 (center), who tested positive for coronavirus at Life Care Center of Kirkland, Washington, March 11

Facilities reporting infections had 5.7 complaints filed against them with state health departments compared to four complaints for those that didn't. Pictured: A cleaning crew exits the Life Care Center in Kirkland, March 11

Facilities reporting infections had 5.7 complaints filed against them with state health departments compared to four complaints for those that didn’t. Pictured: A cleaning crew exits the Life Care Center in Kirkland, March 11

At least 7,000 nursing home residents and staff members across 4,100 US facilities have died since the start of the pandemic.

This makes up nearly 20 percent of the more than 148,000 Americans deaths.  

In March, American Health Care Association President Mark Parkinson called coronavirus an ‘almost a perfect killing machine’ for elderly patients.

This is because the virus spreads very quickly among senior citizens, and particularly in those with underlying health conditions who live very closely together.

For the study, published in JAMA Network Open, the team looked at data from state governments and public health departments that reported nursing homes with  COVID-19 cases.

Data was only available for 23 states: California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Iowa, Illinois, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, North Carolina, North Dakota, New Jersey, New Mexico, Nevada, New York, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon and Tennessee. 

Of the total 8,943 nursing homes, there were 3021 – 33.8 percent – who reported COVID-19 cases by April 29.

Facilities that reported COVID-19 cases had more average health deficiencies than those that didn’t, 67 compared to 52, respectively.

What’s more, nursing homes with coronavirus cases an average of 5.7 complaints filed with its state’s department of health compared to four for those without cases.  

Additionally, facilities reporting cases 59.3 percent of Medicare-covered residents compared to 56.7 percent of facilities not reporting cases.

‘Nursing homes care for aging adults with chronic conditions and have experienced years of declining revenues and financial instability,’ the authors wrote. 

‘These factors have made many facilities ill prepared for a pandemic, and stemming the spread of COVID-19 in nursing homes will not be easy.’

It comes as coronavirus infections in Texas nursing homes continue to skyrocket.  

As of Monday, 8,291 cases have been confirmed in nursing homes, which is four-fold the number of cases reported in June, reported The Texas Tribune.

More than 75 percent of  The Lone Star State’s 1,215 nursing homes have reported at least one case, up from about half that had reported at least one by June. 

Additionally, one-third of the more than 5,000 deaths in Texas have been nursing home residents.  

Assisted living facilities are not doing much better with 924 cases in total after just 267 were reported in June, according to the Tribune.

Coronavirus US: Death toll nears 150k as cases rise in Midwest

The COVID-19 death toll is nearing 150,000 after spiking by 10,000 in just 11 days with hotspot states Florida, California and Texas hitting record daily fatalities – as infections across the US plateau for the first time in two months but continue to spread across Midwest states. 

The number of Americans who have died from coronavirus approached the 150,000 mark on Wednesday. 

Fatalities have increased by about 10,000 since July 17, which marks the fast increase in deaths since the US went from 100,000 to 110,000 fatal cases over 11 days in early June.

Nationally, COVID-19 deaths have risen for three weeks in a row while the number of new cases week-over-week recently fell for the first time since June. 

A half-dozen states in the South and West reported single-day records for coronavirus deaths on Tuesday.

The hotspot states of California, Texas, California and Florida each reported record spikes in fatalities. 

Arkansas, Montana and Oregon also saw single day highs for deaths. 

The number of American who have died from coronavirus approached the 150,000 mark on Wednesday after spiking by 10,000 in just 11 days with hotspot states Florida, California and Texas hitting record daily fatalities

Nationally, COVID-19 deaths have risen for three weeks in a row while the number of new cases week-over-week recently fell for the first time since June

Nationally, COVID-19 deaths have risen for three weeks in a row while the number of new cases week-over-week recently fell for the first time since June

Texas leads the nation with nearly 4,000 deaths so far this month, followed by Florida with 2,690 and California with 2,500. The Texas figure includes a backlog of hundreds of deaths after the state changed the way it counted COVID-19 fatalities.

While deaths have rapidly risen in July in these three states, New York and New Jersey still lead the nation in total lives lost and for deaths per capita. 

Even though deaths are rising across the US, they remain well below levels seen in April when an average of 2,000 people a day were dying from the virus. 

Health experts have indicated the death toll may not be as bad this time around possibly because a large share of the current cases are younger people, who are less likely to die, and because of advances in treatment and knowledge of the virus. 

Deaths are a lagging indicator and can continue to rise weeks after new infections drop. A coronavirus death, when it occurs, typically comes several weeks after a person is first infected.  

Meanwhile, Texas – the second-most populous state – added more than 6,000 new cases on Monday, pushing its total to 401,477. 

Only three other states – California, Florida and New York – have more than 400,000 total cases.  

A spike in infections in Arizona, California, Florida and Texas this month has overwhelmed hospitals and put the states in a dire situation.

There are signs the virus has also been spreading farther north in recent days, causing alarm among public health officials who fear states are not doing enough to avoid catastrophic outbreaks like those seen in the Sunbelt in the past two months.   

Florida deaths

Florida cases

Florida reported its highest single day spike for COVID-19 deaths. The death toll in Florida increased by 186 on Monday, bringing the total number of deaths in the third-most populous US state to 6,117, according the state’s health department

Texas deaths

Texas cases

Texas leads the nation with nearly 4,000 deaths so far this month. The Texas figure includes a backlog of hundreds of deaths after the state changed the way it counted COVID-19 fatalities. Texas – the second-most populous state – added more than 6,000 new cases on Monday, pushing its total to 401,477

California deaths

California cases

California on Tuesday reported 171 deaths. California health officials said Latinos, who make up just over a third of the most populous U.S. state, account for 56% of COVID-19 infections and 46% of deaths

Arkansas deaths

Arkansas casess

Arkansas reported 20 new deaths on Tuesday, bringing its total to 428. The state reported 734 new cases, bringing the total to 40,181

Oregon deaths

Oregon cases

Oregon recorded a record spike of 14 new deaths on Tuesday, bringing its total to 303. The state reported 328 new cases, bringing the total to 17,416

Montana deaths

Montana cases

Montana recorded a single day spike of four new deaths on Tuesday, bringing the total death toll to 51. Cases increased by 94, bringing the total to 3,475 

Dr Anthony Fauci and Dr Deborah Birx, both White House task force members, have said there are signs the virus could be peaking in the South and West while other areas were on the cusp of new outbreaks. 

‘We are watching very carefully California, Arizona, Texas, and most of Florida,’ President Donald Trump said at a news conference on Tuesday. ‘It’s starting to head down to the right direction.’ 

The US is showing early signs that surging case numbers may be leveling out with week-over-week tallies showing infections have dropped two percent for the first time after rising steadily for five weeks. 

Infections have been surging since early June when COVID-19 started spreading rapidly throughout the Sunbelt states and the US recorded single daily highs of more than 77,000 infections. 

The seven-day average for daily infections this week is now just under 66,000. 

The downward trend in cases is prominent in the hotspot states of Florida, Texas, Arizona and California where governors and local officials rolled back reopenings to curb the infection rate. 

But even as cases start to plateau in those hard-hit states, 22 other states are currently seeing an increase in new infections. 

Cases are mostly rising in the Midwest, which public health officials say is a sign the virus is spreading north from the Sunbelt states. 

Fears are growing about the potential for a significant uptick in the Midwest, including Minnesota, Wisconsin, Ohio, Indiana and Colorado, which has been fueled largely by a rise in cases among young adults, who have been hitting bars, restaurants and health clubs again.

Republican governors in Tennessee, Mississippi, Missouri and South Carolina have all resisted calls to close bars and gyms or issue statewide mask requirements, though some local officials have imposed some of their own restrictions.

‘My reaction is that I’m disturbed. I’m disturbed by it,’ Dr Fauci said. 

Those two efforts and other best practices would help ‘prevent the resurgence that we’ve seen in some of the other Southern states.’ 

New coronavirus cases across the United States have started to decline for the first time in five weeks. The downward trend in cases is prominent in the hotspot states of Florida, Texas, Arizona and California. But even as cases start to plateau in those hard-hit states, 22 other states - mostly in the Midwest - are currently seeing an increase in new infections

New coronavirus cases across the United States have started to decline for the first time in five weeks. The downward trend in cases is prominent in the hotspot states of Florida, Texas, Arizona and California. But even as cases start to plateau in those hard-hit states, 22 other states – mostly in the Midwest – are currently seeing an increase in new infections

Over the past two weeks, Wisconsin’s rolling average number of new confirmed cases has increased by 31%. Minnesota reported its largest one-day case count Sunday, with more than 860 cases. 

In Mississippi, nine of the state’s biggest hospitals had no open intensive care beds as of Monday, and officials are considering opening pop-up facilities. More than 24% of coronavirus tests have come back positive in Mississippi over the past week, the highest rate in the nation and triple the national average. 

In Missouri, larger cities are growing rattled by a spike in cases after the state fully reopened. It reported another daily record in cases, with nearly 1,800. St. Louis is curtailing bar hours and reducing restaurant seating capacity starting Friday, and Kansas City may follow suit.

Oklahoma Gov. Kevin Stitt returned to his office Monday after two weeks of isolating at home following a positive coronavirus test. It came on the same day the state reported over 1,400 new confirmed cases – the second consecutive day of record highs. 

The rise in deaths and infections has dampened early hopes the country was past the worst of an economic crisis that has decimated businesses and put millions of Americans out of work.

The trend has fueled a bitter debate over the reopening of schools in the coming weeks. President Donald Trump and members of his administration have pushed for students to return to class, while some teachers and local officials have called for online learning.

'We are watching very carefully California, Arizona, Texas, and most of Florida,' President Donald Trump said at a news conference on Tuesday. 'It's starting to head down to the right direction.'

‘We are watching very carefully California, Arizona, Texas, and most of Florida,’ President Donald Trump said at a news conference on Tuesday. ‘It’s starting to head down to the right direction.’

‘We will fight on all fronts for the safety of students and their educators,’ Randi Weingarten, president of the American Federation of Teachers, said during the union’s virtual convention on Tuesday. ‘It’s the 11th hour; we need the resources now.’

The Texas Education Agency, the state’s overseer of public education, said it would deny funding to schools that delay in-person classes because of orders by local health authorities related to the pandemic.

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton issued guidance that health authorities cannot impose ‘blanket’ school closures for coronavirus prevention. Any such decision is up to school officials, he said.

Local health leaders in the biggest metropolitan areas in Texas, including Houston and Dallas, have recently ordered the postponement of in-person classes. 

In Washington, some Republicans in the US Senate pushed back against their own party’s $1 trillion coronavirus relief proposal the day after it was unveiled by Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, weighing on stocks.

‘I’m not for borrowing another trillion dollars,’ Republican Senator Rand Paul told reporters.

Democrats have rejected the plan as too limited compared with their $3 trillion proposal that passed the House of Representatives in May. Some Republicans called it too expensive.

Trump said on Tuesday he did not support everything in the Senate Republican coronavirus relief legislation but would not elaborate.

‘There are also things that I very much support,’ he told a White House briefing. ‘But we’ll be negotiating.’

Trump also groused about Fauci’s high approval ratings and joked ‘nobody likes me’ as he struggles to improve his standing with voters over his handling of the coronavirus pandemic.

‘It can only be my personality,’ Trump said.

Florida reports record single-day spike in deaths


Florida has reported its highest single day spike for COVID-19 deaths and the number of infections in fellow hotspot state Texas has now surpassed 400,000, prompting fears the United States has lost control of the outbreak despite a plateau in cases across the country.

The death toll in Florida increased by 186 on Monday, bringing the total number of deaths in the third-most populous US state to 6,117, according the state’s health department. 

It is the the highest single-day spike since the start of the coronavirus pandemic. 

Texas, the second-most populous state, added more than 6,000 new cases on Monday, pushing its total to 401,477. 

Only three other states – California, Florida and New York – have more than 400,000 total cases.  

The widening outbreak has pushed the US death toll from COVID-19 closer to the 150,000 mark. The national death toll rose to 148,298 on Monday, with more than 4.3 million confirmed cases. 

The death toll in Florida increased by 186 on Monday, bringing the total number of deaths in the third-most populous US state to 6,117, according the state’s health department 

Texas, the second-most populous state, added more than 6,000 new cases on Monday, pushing its total to 401,477. Only three other states – California, Florida and New York – have more than 400,000 total cases

The surge in cases in Florida prompted President Donald Trump last week to cancel his Republican Party’s nominating convention events in Jacksonville in late August. 

Major League Baseball has also postponed some games in its truncated delayed season after a number of Miami Marlins members tested positive for the virus. 

There is, however, a glimmer of hope in the data from Texas, where the state health department reported that current hospitalizations due to COVID-19 fell on Monday. 

The surges came as new COVID-19 cases across the US have started to decline for the first time in five weeks and the average daily toll of 66,000 infections is now the lowest it has been in 10 days.  

Infections have been surging since early June when COVID-19 started spreading rapidly throughout the Sunbelt states and the US recorded single daily highs of more than 77,000 infections. 

The US is now showing early signs that surging case numbers may be leveling out with week-over-week tallies showing infections have dropped two percent for the first time after rising steadily for five weeks. 

The seven-day average for daily infections this week is now just under 66,000.  

The downward trend in cases is prominent in the hotspot states of Florida, Texas, Arizona and California where governors and local officials rolled back reopenings to curb the infection rate. But even as cases start to plateau in those hard-hit states, 22 other states are currently seeing an increase in new infections.  

Twenty states are seeing steady case numbers and eight states saw decreases in the number of infections in the last week. 

Cases are mostly rising in the Midwest, which public health officials say is a sign the virus is spreading north from the Sunbelt states.   

New coronavirus cases across the United States have started to decline for the first time in five weeks. The downward trend in cases is prominent in the hotspot states of Florida, Texas, Arizona and California. But even as cases start to plateau in those hard-hit states, 22 other states – mostly in the Midwest – are currently seeing an increase in new infections 

The US is now showing early signs that surging case numbers may be leveling out. The seven-day average for daily infections this week is now just under 66,000

The US is now showing early signs that surging case numbers may be leveling out. The seven-day average for daily infections this week is now just under 66,000

Deaths across the US have risen for the third straight week with 15 states reporting weekly increases in fatalities for at least two consecutive weeks. Deaths are a lagging indicator and can continue to rise weeks after new infections drop

Deaths across the US have risen for the third straight week with 15 states reporting weekly increases in fatalities for at least two consecutive weeks. Deaths are a lagging indicator and can continue to rise weeks after new infections drop

Infections also surged this week in some Northeastern states, like New Jersey, where infections fell after peaking in April. 

The states that saw the highest increases compared to the previous week are Hawaii (87.6%), New Jersey (67%), Alaska (64%), Mississippi (52%), Connecticut (45.7%), Nebraska (44%) and Missouri (38.7%). 

Meanwhile, deaths across the US have risen for the third straight week with 15 states reporting weekly increases in fatalities for at least two consecutive weeks, according to a Reuters tally of state and county reports.  

In Texas, more than 1,000 people died in the last seven days, or 20 percent of the state’s more than 5,000 total deaths. 

Deaths increased in the last week in Georgia (89%), Missouri (85%), Kansas (80%), South Carolina (73%), Louisiana (73%), New Mexico (65%) and Nevada (61%).  

Even those deaths are rising across the US, they remain well below levels seen in April when an average of 2,000 people a day were dying from the virus. 

Health experts have indicated the death toll may not be as bad this time around possibly because a large share of the current cases are younger people, who are less likely to die, and because of advances in treatment and knowledge of the virus. 

Deaths are a lagging indicator and can continue to rise weeks after new infections drop. A coronavirus death, when it occurs, typically comes several weeks after a person is first infected. 

Dr Deborah Birx, the head of the White House COVID-19 taskforce, has continued to urge states with rising infections to close bars, cut back on indoor dining and to mandate face masks in order to stop the spread of the virus. 

She said the surge in cases that has plagued Sunbelt states since Memorial Day is now being seen elsewhere, which is a sign that the virus is now spreading North.  

The states with rising cases should be closing bars, cutting back on indoor restaurant capacity and limiting social gatherings to 10 people, Dr Birx warned. 

She also said all Americans should be wearing masks when out in public or around other people. 

‘We can see what is happening in the South moving North,’ Dr Birx said. ‘We do believe there are states that do need to close their bars.’ 

Dr Anthony Fauci, a fellow task force member, said there were signs the recent surge could be peaking in hard-hit states like Florida and Texas while other parts of the country may be on the cusp of growing outbreaks. 

‘They may be cresting and coming back down,’ Fauci, head of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, told ABC’s Good Morning America regarding the state of the outbreak in several Sunbelt states. 

Fauci said there was a ‘very early indication’ that the percentage of coronavirus tests that were positive was starting to rise in other states, such as Ohio, Indiana, Tennessee and Kentucky. 

Florida reports record single-day spike in deaths


Florida has reported its highest single day spike for COVID-19 deaths and the number of infections in fellow hotspot state Texas has now surpassed 400,000, prompting fears the United States has lost control of the outbreak despite a plateau in cases across the country.

The death toll in Florida increased by 186 on Monday, bringing the total number of deaths in the third-most populous US state to 6,117, according the state’s health department. 

It is the the highest single-day spike since the start of the coronavirus pandemic. 

Texas, the second-most populous state, added more than 6,000 new cases on Monday, pushing its total to 401,477. 

Only three other states – California, Florida and New York – have more than 400,000 total cases.  

The widening outbreak has pushed the US death toll from COVID-19 closer to the 150,000 mark. The national death toll rose to 148,298 on Monday, with more than 4.3 million confirmed cases. 

The death toll in Florida increased by 186 on Monday, bringing the total number of deaths in the third-most populous US state to 6,117, according the state’s health department 

Texas, the second-most populous state, added more than 6,000 new cases on Monday, pushing its total to 401,477. Only three other states – California, Florida and New York – have more than 400,000 total cases

The surge in cases in Florida prompted President Donald Trump last week to cancel his Republican Party’s nominating convention events in Jacksonville in late August. 

Major League Baseball has also postponed some games in its truncated delayed season after a number of Miami Marlins members tested positive for the virus. 

There is, however, a glimmer of hope in the data from Texas, where the state health department reported that current hospitalizations due to COVID-19 fell on Monday. 

The surges came as new COVID-19 cases across the US have started to decline for the first time in five weeks and the average daily toll of 66,000 infections is now the lowest it has been in 10 days.  

Infections have been surging since early June when COVID-19 started spreading rapidly throughout the Sunbelt states and the US recorded single daily highs of more than 77,000 infections. 

The US is now showing early signs that surging case numbers may be leveling out with week-over-week tallies showing infections have dropped two percent for the first time after rising steadily for five weeks. 

The seven-day average for daily infections this week is now just under 66,000.  

The downward trend in cases is prominent in the hotspot states of Florida, Texas, Arizona and California where governors and local officials rolled back reopenings to curb the infection rate. But even as cases start to plateau in those hard-hit states, 22 other states are currently seeing an increase in new infections.  

Twenty states are seeing steady case numbers and eight states saw decreases in the number of infections in the last week. 

Cases are mostly rising in the Midwest, which public health officials say is a sign the virus is spreading north from the Sunbelt states.   

New coronavirus cases across the United States have started to decline for the first time in five weeks. The downward trend in cases is prominent in the hotspot states of Florida, Texas, Arizona and California. But even as cases start to plateau in those hard-hit states, 22 other states – mostly in the Midwest – are currently seeing an increase in new infections 

The US is now showing early signs that surging case numbers may be leveling out. The seven-day average for daily infections this week is now just under 66,000

The US is now showing early signs that surging case numbers may be leveling out. The seven-day average for daily infections this week is now just under 66,000

Deaths across the US have risen for the third straight week with 15 states reporting weekly increases in fatalities for at least two consecutive weeks. Deaths are a lagging indicator and can continue to rise weeks after new infections drop

Deaths across the US have risen for the third straight week with 15 states reporting weekly increases in fatalities for at least two consecutive weeks. Deaths are a lagging indicator and can continue to rise weeks after new infections drop

Infections also surged this week in some Northeastern states, like New Jersey, where infections fell after peaking in April. 

The states that saw the highest increases compared to the previous week are Hawaii (87.6%), New Jersey (67%), Alaska (64%), Mississippi (52%), Connecticut (45.7%), Nebraska (44%) and Missouri (38.7%). 

Meanwhile, deaths across the US have risen for the third straight week with 15 states reporting weekly increases in fatalities for at least two consecutive weeks, according to a Reuters tally of state and county reports.  

In Texas, more than 1,000 people died in the last seven days, or 20 percent of the state’s more than 5,000 total deaths. 

Deaths increased in the last week in Georgia (89%), Missouri (85%), Kansas (80%), South Carolina (73%), Louisiana (73%), New Mexico (65%) and Nevada (61%).  

Even those deaths are rising across the US, they remain well below levels seen in April when an average of 2,000 people a day were dying from the virus. 

Health experts have indicated the death toll may not be as bad this time around possibly because a large share of the current cases are younger people, who are less likely to die, and because of advances in treatment and knowledge of the virus. 

Deaths are a lagging indicator and can continue to rise weeks after new infections drop. A coronavirus death, when it occurs, typically comes several weeks after a person is first infected. 

Dr Deborah Birx, the head of the White House COVID-19 taskforce, has continued to urge states with rising infections to close bars, cut back on indoor dining and to mandate face masks in order to stop the spread of the virus. 

She said the surge in cases that has plagued Sunbelt states since Memorial Day is now being seen elsewhere, which is a sign that the virus is now spreading North.  

The states with rising cases should be closing bars, cutting back on indoor restaurant capacity and limiting social gatherings to 10 people, Dr Birx warned. 

She also said all Americans should be wearing masks when out in public or around other people. 

‘We can see what is happening in the South moving North,’ Dr Birx said. ‘We do believe there are states that do need to close their bars.’ 

Dr Anthony Fauci, a fellow task force member, said there were signs the recent surge could be peaking in hard-hit states like Florida and Texas while other parts of the country may be on the cusp of growing outbreaks. 

‘They may be cresting and coming back down,’ Fauci, head of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, told ABC’s Good Morning America regarding the state of the outbreak in several Sunbelt states. 

Fauci said there was a ‘very early indication’ that the percentage of coronavirus tests that were positive was starting to rise in other states, such as Ohio, Indiana, Tennessee and Kentucky. 

New COVID-19 cases hit fresh highs in more than a DOZEN states


New coronavirus cases have been hitting fresh highs in more than a dozen states as the head of the White House task force Dr Deborah Birx urged the regions with surging infections to close bars, cut back on indoor dining and mandate face masks. 

There has now been more than 4.2 million infections recorded across the United States and nearly 147,000 Americans have died from COVID-19. 

The number of cases in the current hard hit states of Texas, California, Arizona and Florida are now showing signs of plateauing after a month of record surges.

But the number of infections are now spiking, based on a seven-day average, in more than a dozen states, including Oklahoma, Missouri, Mississippi, Louisiana, Montana, New Mexico, North Dakota, Wisconsin, Alaska, Colorado, Hawaii and Wyoming.

Meanwhile, Nevada, Texas and South Carolina have seen record highs in the number of deaths based on a seven-day average. 

Dr Birx, who is the head of the White House COVID-19 taskforce, said the surge in cases that has plagued Sunbelt states since Memorial Day is now being seen elsewhere, which is a sign that the virus is now spreading North. 

Missouri deaths

MISSOURI: There are currently 41,927 cases in Missouri and 1,197 deaths. Cases have been steadily increasing across the state since mid-June and deaths have not

Mississippi cases

Mississippi deaths

MISSISSIPPI: Cases have been rising steadily in Mississippi with that state now having 52,304 cases. There have been 1,495 deaths and the fatality rate is now showing signs of an uptick

Oklahoma cases

Oklahoma deaths

OKLAHOMA: Oklahoma currently has 31,285 cases and 496 deaths. Both cases and deaths have been rising this month

The states with rising cases should be closing bars, cutting back on indoor restaurant capacity and limiting social gatherings to 10 people, Dr Birx warned. 

She also said all Americans should be wearing masks when out in public or around other people. 

‘We can see what is happening in the South moving North,’ Dr Birx said. ‘We do believe there are states that do need to close their bars.’ 

Oklahoma hit a record for new cases five times throughout July, with 1,204 new infections on Sunday, bringing the state’s total to 31,285. 

In Missouri, infections surged to record daily highs on Saturday with 1,652 new cases. Infections across the state, which now has 41,927 cases, have been on an upward trajectory since late June. 

Mississippi’s cases have been spiking to near record highs in recent days with 1,610 infections reported on Friday, down from the record 1,904 on July 4. Infections have surged this month with the total now at 52,304. 

Florida on Sunday became the second state after California to overtake New York, the original epicenter of the US outbreak.  

Total COVID-19 cases in Florida rose by 9,300 to 423,855 on Sunday, just one place behind California, which now leads the country with 448,497 cases. New York is in third place with 415,827 cases. 

After New York, Texas has the most total coronavirus cases at 391,000. Arizona has 162,014 coronavirus cases.  

Wisconsin cases

Wisconsin deaths

WISCONSIN: Cases in Wisconsin surged to a single-day high of 1,161 on July 21. Cases across the state, which now total 52,680, have been trending upwards since mid-June. There has also been an uptick of deaths in the state with the death toll now at 899

New Mexico cases

New Mexico deaths

NEW MEXICO: New Mexico had a record 335 cases on Friday with the state’s total now at 18,788. Deaths are also on a slight upward trend with the death toll now at 607

Louisiana cases

Louisiana deaths

LOUISIANA: New cases surge in the southern state to record high of 3,840 on Sunday, bringing the state’s total to 107,574. Cases have been trending upwards since late June. Deaths started trending upwards last week after initially declining in May

Still, New York has recorded the most deaths of any US state at more than 32,000 with Florida in eighth place with nearly 6,000 deaths.

On average, Florida has added more than 10,000 cases a day in July while California has been adding 8,300 cases a day and New York has been adding 700 cases. 

Dr Birx said last week that there were signs cases in Florida, Texas, Arizona and California were now plateauing. 

Dr Birx, who is the head of the White House COVID-19 taskforce, said the surge in cases that has plagued Sunbelt states since Memorial Day is now being seen elsewhere, which is a sign that the virus is now spreading North

Dr Birx, who is the head of the White House COVID-19 taskforce, said the surge in cases that has plagued Sunbelt states since Memorial Day is now being seen elsewhere, which is a sign that the virus is now spreading North

‘We’re already starting to see some plateauing in these critically four states that have really suffered under the last four weeks,’ Birx told NBC’s Today. 

‘This first wave that we see now across Florida, Texas, California and Arizona began with under 30 years olds – many of those who were asymptomatic. 

‘It’s very serious and it’s very real.’

She also warned last week that 11 major cities needed to take ‘aggressive’ steps to mitigate COVID-19 outbreaks. 

The 11 cities she mentioned include: Baltimore, Cleveland, Columbus, Indianapolis, Las Vegas, Miami, Minneapolis, Nashville, New Orleans, Pittsburgh and St Louis. 

‘Until you can see that explosion, it’s hard for people to understand how deeply you have to clamp down,’ Dr Birx said. 

‘That’s why we called out the next set of cities where we see early-warning signs, because if you make changes now, you won’t become a Phoenix.’  

Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar said people ‘stepping up to the plate’ is the reason for some of the ‘plateauing’ in coronavirus cases being seen in Arizona, California, Florida and Texas. 

In an interview Monday on Fox News’ Fox and Friends, Azar said officials think ‘it’s due to the fact that people are actually wearing their masks.’  

There has now been more than 4.2 million infections recorded across the United States and nearly 147,000 Americans have died from COVID-19

There has now been more than 4.2 million infections recorded across the United States and nearly 147,000 Americans have died from COVID-19

He said they’re also social distancing and practicing good hygiene, and he complimented governors for closing bars, where it’s difficult to be socially distant and wear a mask. 

‘So people are stepping up to the plate and doing what we’re asking and what the governors are asking and we see it has an impact,’ Azar said. 

As the pandemic has spread from the early epicenter of New York to the South and West, federal, state and local officials have clashed over how to ease lockdowns imposed to curb the infection rate, including in some states whether to rollback reopenings. 

The ordering of face coverings, a common practice around the world and recommended by the federal government’s own health experts, has also become highly politicized, with some Republican governors particularly resistant.

Hostility to the idea now appears to be dwindling, including from the Republican administration of President Donald Trump, who once dismissed mask-wearing as an effort to be politically correct. 

Trump, who faces falling poll numbers over his handling of the health crisis ahead of the November election, has long refused to wear a mask in public but last week encouraged Americans to do so.