Trump tweets ‘people are not happy’ with athletes kneeling

President Donald Trump took aim at protesting athletes again on Tuesday, tweeting that people ‘are not happy that players are not standing for our National Anthem!’

Although some NFL players have done so since 2016, athletes across the NBA, NHL and Major League Baseball have recently begun kneeling in protest of racism during The Star-Spangled Banner. However, despite Trump’s claim, the leagues’ television audiences do not appear to have suffered.   

For instance, NBA viewership is up 14 percent on ESPN and TNT since the league restarted its pandemic-interrupted season at Disney World last week. 

TNT’s opening doubled header averaged an impressive 2.9 million viewers on Thursday, while that night’s Lakers-Clippers game specifically averaged 3.4 million, more than doubling the network’s regular season mark.  

Likewise, Friday’s Rockets-Mavericks game drew 1.7 million viewers, and Sunday’s Rockets-Bucks game also did well, attracting 2.2 million and giving ABC a demographic victory among adults 18 to 49. 

President Donald Trump took aim at protesting athletes again on Tuesday, tweeting that people ‘are not happy that players are not standing for our National Anthem!’

Members of the Sacramento Kings and Orlando Magic kneel in protest before a recent game

Members of the Sacramento Kings and Orlando Magic kneel in protest before a recent game 

San Francisco Giants manager Gabe Kapler kneels during the playing of the National Anthem prior to their game against the Texas Rangers at Oracle Park on Saturday

San Francisco Giants manager Gabe Kapler kneels during the playing of the National Anthem prior to their game against the Texas Rangers at Oracle Park on Saturday

Minnesota Wild's Matt Dumba takes a knee during the national anthem flanked by Edmonton Oilers' Darnell Nurse, right, and Chicago Blackhawks' Malcolm Subban before an NHL hockey Stanley Cup playoff game in Edmonton on Saturday

Minnesota Wild’s Matt Dumba takes a knee during the national anthem flanked by Edmonton Oilers’ Darnell Nurse, right, and Chicago Blackhawks’ Malcolm Subban before an NHL hockey Stanley Cup playoff game in Edmonton on Saturday 

MLB’s ratings are off to a strong start as well. 

The opening weekend drew 25 million unique viewers, tripling the audience size from 2019, according to MLB; while ESPN’s first 12 games of 2020 averaged nearly 1.2 million viewers – a 34 percent jump from last year. 

In fact, ESPN’s season Yankees-Nationals opener drew four million viewers, a record average audience for MLB’s opening night game, according to SportsProMedia.com.

Meanwhile Fox has seen a double-digit rise, according to The Wall Street Journal, and TBS’ first game of 2020 was also major success, roping in 653,000 viewers — a 65 percent improvement over 2019.

The league’s digital subscription service, MLB.TV, has also seen a surge in viewership, recording three of its five most-watched days ever with 924,000 unique users.

Ryan Reaves #75 and Robin Lehner #90 of the Vegas Golden Knights kneel during the singing of the American national anthem alongside Jason Dickinson #18 and Tyler Seguin #91 of the Dallas Stars before the start of the Round Robin game

Ryan Reaves #75 and Robin Lehner #90 of the Vegas Golden Knights kneel during the singing of the American national anthem alongside Jason Dickinson #18 and Tyler Seguin #91 of the Dallas Stars before the start of the Round Robin game

The NHL’s ratings, while not as high as its competitors’, have also been strong since the league re-opened inside bubbles in Toronto and Edmonton on Saturday.

NBC enjoyed its most-watched double-header in four years, thanks largely to the Montreal Canadiens’ 3-2 overtime win over the Pittsburgh Penguins on Monday that drew 1.5 million North American viewers.

Minnesota Wild defenseman Matt Dumba became the league’s first player to kneel in protest during the anthem on Saturday, and he has since been followed by a handful of other players.  

Compared to the NFL, players in the NHL, NBA, and MLB are relatively new to protesting.  

All three of those leagues were suspended amid the coronavirus outbreak when African-American man George Floyd was killed in Minneapolis police custody on May 25, sparking nationwide protests. Now, since returning to play, each league has acknowledged the social justice movement, while many individual players have knelt in protest.

Orlando Magic's Jonathan Isaac (1) stands as others kneel before the start of an NBA basketball game against the Brooklyn Nets

Orlando Magic’s Jonathan Isaac (1) stands as others kneel before the start of an NBA basketball game against the Brooklyn Nets

Nearly every NBA player has taken a knee during the anthem as commissioner Adam Silver vowed not to enforce the league’s 39-year-old rule requiring players to stand.

One notable exception has been Orlando Magic forward Jonathan Isaac, whose decision appeared to resonate with critics of the protests.

Isaac's replica jersey had never been among the top sellers at the league's online store, but according to the NBA, it ranked second behind only LeBron James' Lakers uniform between July 30, when the season restarted, and August 3

Isaac’s replica jersey had never been among the top sellers at the league’s online store, but according to the NBA, it ranked second behind only LeBron James’ Lakers uniform between July 30, when the season restarted, and August 3

Isaac’s replica jersey had never been among the top sellers at the league’s online store, but according to the NBA, it ranked second behind only LeBron James’ Lakers uniform between July 30, when the season restarted, and August 3.

Isaac, who also refused to wear a Black Lives Matter t-shirt with his teammates before the game, explained his decision to reporters afterwards.

‘Absolutely I believe Black Lives Matter,’ he said. ‘A lot went into my decision … kneeling or wearing a Black Lives Matter T-shirt don’t go hand in hand in supporting Black lives. I do believe that Black lives matter, I just felt like it was a decision I had to make, and I didn’t feel like putting that shirt on and kneeling went hand in hand with supporting Black lives.

‘I don’t think that kneeling or putting on a T-shirt for me, personally, is the answer. For me, Black lives are supported through the Gospel, all lives are supported through the Gospel.’

Unfortunately for Isaac, his season came to an abrupt end on Sunday when he tore the ACL in his left knee during a win over Sacramento. 

The the demonstrations have been a source of controversy since 2016, with then-San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick refusing to stand for the anthem to raise awareness about inequality and racist police brutality.

Since September of 2017, when Trump first seized upon the issue at a rally in Alabama, the President has repeatedly voiced his objection to athletes kneeling in protest. Over that time he has mentioned the word ‘anthem’ in no fewer than 30 tweets.

Although NFL ratings dropped 17 percent in 2017 and 2018 as players continued protesting during the anthem, the league had a 5 percent uptick last season while boasting 46 of the 50 most-watched telecasts during the year. 

The controversial protests began in 2016 with then-49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick (No. 7) refusing to stand for the anthem to raise awareness about inequality and police brutality

The controversial protests began in 2016 with then-49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick (No. 7) refusing to stand for the anthem to raise awareness about inequality and police brutality

Trump tweets ‘people are not happy’ with athletes kneeling

President Donald Trump took aim at protesting athletes again on Tuesday, tweeting that people ‘are not happy that players are not standing for our National Anthem!’

Although some NFL players have done so since 2016, athletes across the NBA, NHL and Major League Baseball have recently begun kneeling in protest of racism during The Star-Spangled Banner. However, despite Trump’s claim, the leagues’ television audiences do not appear to have suffered.   

For instance, NBA viewership is up 14 percent on ESPN and TNT since restarting its pandemic-interrupted season at Disney World last week, according to the league. 

TNT’s opening doubled header averaged an impressive 2.9 million viewers on Thursday, while that night’s Lakers-Clippers game specifically averaged 3.4 million, more than doubling the network’s regular season mark. 

Meanwhile Friday’s Rockets-Mavericks game drew 1.7 million viewers, and Sunday’s Rockets-Bucks game also did well, drawing 2.2 million and giving ABC a demographic victory among adults 18 to 49. 

President Donald Trump took aim at protesting athletes again on Tuesday, tweeting that people ‘are not happy that players are not standing for our National Anthem!’

Members of the Sacramento Kings and Orlando Magic kneel in protest before a recent game

Members of the Sacramento Kings and Orlando Magic kneel in protest before a recent game 

San Francisco Giants manager Gabe Kapler kneels during the playing of the National Anthem prior to their game against the Texas Rangers at Oracle Park on Saturday

San Francisco Giants manager Gabe Kapler kneels during the playing of the National Anthem prior to their game against the Texas Rangers at Oracle Park on Saturday

Minnesota Wild's Matt Dumba takes a knee during the national anthem flanked by Edmonton Oilers' Darnell Nurse, right, and Chicago Blackhawks' Malcolm Subban before an NHL hockey Stanley Cup playoff game in Edmonton on Saturday

Minnesota Wild’s Matt Dumba takes a knee during the national anthem flanked by Edmonton Oilers’ Darnell Nurse, right, and Chicago Blackhawks’ Malcolm Subban before an NHL hockey Stanley Cup playoff game in Edmonton on Saturday 

MLB’s ratings are off to a strong start as well. 

The opening weekend drew 25 million unique viewers, tripling the audience size from 2019, according to MLB; while ESPN’s first 12 games of 2020 averaged nearly 1.2 million viewers – a 34 percent jump from last year. 

In fact, ESPN’s season Yankees-Nationals opener drew four million viewers, a record average audience for MLB’s opening night game, according to SportsProMedia.com.

Meanwhile Fox has seen a double-digit rise, according to The Wall Street Journal, and TBS’ first game of 2020 was also major success, roping in 653,000 viewers — a 65 percent improvement over 2019.

The league’s digital subscription service, MLB.TV, has also seen a surge in viewership, recording three of its five most-watched days ever with 924,000 unique users.

Ryan Reaves #75 and Robin Lehner #90 of the Vegas Golden Knights kneel during the singing of the American national anthem alongside Jason Dickinson #18 and Tyler Seguin #91 of the Dallas Stars before the start of the Round Robin game

Ryan Reaves #75 and Robin Lehner #90 of the Vegas Golden Knights kneel during the singing of the American national anthem alongside Jason Dickinson #18 and Tyler Seguin #91 of the Dallas Stars before the start of the Round Robin game

The NHL’s ratings, while not as high as its competitors’, have also been strong since the league re-opened inside bubbles in Toronto and Edmonton on Saturday.

NBC enjoyed its most-watched double-header in four years, thanks largely to the Montreal Canadiens’ 3-2 overtime win over the Pittsburgh Penguins on Monday that drew 1.5 million North American viewers.

Minnesota Wild defenseman Matt Dumba became the league’s first player to kneel in protest during the anthem on Saturday, and he has since been followed by a handful of other players.  

Compared to the NFL, players in the NHL, NBA, and MLB are relatively new to protesting.  

All three of those leagues were suspended amid the coronavirus outbreak when African-American man George Floyd was killed in Minneapolis police custody on May 25, sparking nationwide protests. Now, since returning to play, each league has acknowledged the social justice movement, while many individual players have knelt in protest.

Orlando Magic's Jonathan Isaac (1) stands as others kneel before the start of an NBA basketball game against the Brooklyn Nets

Orlando Magic’s Jonathan Isaac (1) stands as others kneel before the start of an NBA basketball game against the Brooklyn Nets

Nearly every NBA player has taken a knee during the anthem as commissioner Adam Silver vowed not to enforce the league’s 39-year-old rule requiring players to stand.

One notable exception has been Orlando Magic forward Jonathan Isaac, whose decision appeared to resonate with critics of the protests.

Isaac's replica jersey had never been among the top sellers at the league's online store, but according to the NBA, it ranked second behind only LeBron James' Lakers uniform between July 30, when the season restarted, and August 3

Isaac’s replica jersey had never been among the top sellers at the league’s online store, but according to the NBA, it ranked second behind only LeBron James’ Lakers uniform between July 30, when the season restarted, and August 3

Isaac’s replica jersey had never been among the top sellers at the league’s online store, but according to the NBA, it ranked second behind only LeBron James’ Lakers uniform between July 30, when the season restarted, and August 3.

Isaac, who also refused to wear a Black Lives Matter t-shirt with his teammates before the game, explained his decision to reporters afterwards.

‘Absolutely I believe Black Lives Matter,’ he said. ‘A lot went into my decision … kneeling or wearing a Black Lives Matter T-shirt don’t go hand in hand in supporting Black lives. I do believe that Black lives matter, I just felt like it was a decision I had to make, and I didn’t feel like putting that shirt on and kneeling went hand in hand with supporting Black lives.

‘I don’t think that kneeling or putting on a T-shirt for me, personally, is the answer. For me, Black lives are supported through the Gospel, all lives are supported through the Gospel.’

Unfortunately for Isaac, his season came to an abrupt end on Sunday when he tore the ACL in his left knee during a win over Sacramento. 

The the demonstrations have been a source of controversy since 2016, with then-San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick refusing to stand for the anthem to raise awareness about inequality and racist police brutality.

Since September of 2017, when Trump first seized upon the issue at a rally in Alabama, the President has repeatedly voiced his objection to athletes kneeling in protest. Over that time he has mentioned the word ‘anthem’ in no fewer than 30 tweets.

Although NFL ratings dropped 17 percent in 2017 and 2018 as players continued protesting during the anthem, the league had a 5 percent uptick last season while boasting 46 of the 50 most-watched telecasts during the year. 

The controversial protests began in 2016 with then-49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick (No. 7) refusing to stand for the anthem to raise awareness about inequality and police brutality

The controversial protests began in 2016 with then-49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick (No. 7) refusing to stand for the anthem to raise awareness about inequality and police brutality

Ryan Reynolds regrets having 2012 wedding at a plantation

Ryan Reynolds has expressed regret at having married Blake Lively on a plantation back in 2012, during an interview with Fast Company.

The 43-year-old Deadpool actor and the 32-year-old Gossip Girl alum tied the knot at Boone Hall, a former plantation in South Carolina, and were subsequently criticized for glamorizing a place where black slaves once suffered and died.

And the Canadian star was unequivocal in his apology when talking to the magazine for their September issue, calling the choice of location ‘something we’ll always be deeply and unreservedly sorry for’.  

‘A giant f***ing mistake’: Ryan Reynolds has expressed regret over the venue of his 2012 wedding to Blake Lively during an interview with Fast Company. The couple seen here in 2011

The star of The Hitman’s Bodyguard then called the decision ‘impossible to reconcile.’

‘What we saw at the time was a wedding venue on Pinterest. What we saw after was a place built upon devastating tragedy.’ 

‘Years ago we got married again at home – but shame works in weird ways. A giant f***ing mistake like that can either cause you to shut down or it can reframe things and move you into action,’ continued the action star. 

‘It doesn’t mean you won’t f*** up again. But repatterning and challenging lifelong social conditioning is a job that doesn’t end.’

Boone Hall Plantation also famously appeared in Rachel McAdams and Ryan Gosling’s romantic 2004 movie, The Notebook. 

History: The 43-year-old Deadpool actor and the 32-year-old Gossip Girl alum tied the knot at Boone Hall, a former plantation in South Carolina, and were subsequently criticized for glamorizing a place where black slaves once suffered and died

History: The 43-year-old Deadpool actor and the 32-year-old Gossip Girl alum tied the knot at Boone Hall, a former plantation in South Carolina, and were subsequently criticized for glamorizing a place where black slaves once suffered and died

Amends: In May, the couple donated $200,000 to the NAACP, as well as releasing a statement which read in part, 'We're ashamed that in the past we've allowed ourselves to be uninformed about how deeply rooted systemic racism is'

Amends: In May, the couple donated $200,000 to the NAACP, as well as releasing a statement which read in part, ‘We’re ashamed that in the past we’ve allowed ourselves to be uninformed about how deeply rooted systemic racism is’

In May, the couple donated $200,000 to the NAACP, as well as releasing a statement which read in part, ‘We’re ashamed that in the past we’ve allowed ourselves to be uninformed about how deeply rooted systemic racism is.’ 

Back in 2012, the Green Lantern stars held their nuptials in an intimate ceremony in Charleston, South Carolina – to which just 35 guests were invited. 

Blake’s self-confessed ‘idol’ Martha Stewart helped to create the big day, alongside local wedding planner Tara Guérard.

Florence Welch performed during the ceremony, and Bette Midler was one of a number of high profile guests who attended, as well as Blake’s The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants co-stars America Ferrera, Amber Tamblyn, and Alexis Bledel.

Ryan and Blake have gone on to have three daughters: James, five, Inez, three, and a third daughter, born last year in October, whom the pair have so far declined to name publicly. 

The stars were first photographed as a couple in October 2011, not long after the premiere of their film, Green Lantern. 

Unreserved: The Canadian star was unequivocal in his apology when talking to the magazine for their September issue, calling the choice of location 'something we¿ll always be deeply and unreservedly sorry for'

Unreserved: The Canadian star was unequivocal in his apology when talking to the magazine for their September issue, calling the choice of location ‘something we’ll always be deeply and unreservedly sorry for’

Long time loves: The stars were first photographed as a couple in October 2011, not long after the premiere of their film, Green Lantern. Seen here in May 2019

Long time loves: The stars were first photographed as a couple in October 2011, not long after the premiere of their film, Green Lantern. Seen here in May 2019

His girls: Ryan and Blake have gone on to have three daughters: James, five, Inez, three, and a third daughter, born last year in October, whom the pair have so far declined to name publicly. Ryan, Blake, James and Inez seen here in 2016

His girls: Ryan and Blake have gone on to have three daughters: James, five, Inez, three, and a third daughter, born last year in October, whom the pair have so far declined to name publicly. Ryan, Blake, James and Inez seen here in 2016

And Ryan poked fun at the much maligned superhero film on Tuesday, tweeting out a comically abbreviated ‘cut’ of the movie.

Reynolds had condensed the DC comics film, which garnered a mere 26% critical rating on Rotten Tomatoes, down to just 27 seconds.

He captioned the tweet, ‘Here’s the secret Reynolds Cut of GL you all haven’t been waiting for. In order to make it as great as possible we made some difficult and judicious cuts.’ 

Green Lantern: Ryan poked fun at the much maligned superhero film on Tuesday, tweeting out a comically abbreviated 'cut' of the movie

Green Lantern: Ryan poked fun at the much maligned superhero film on Tuesday, tweeting out a comically abbreviated ‘cut’ of the movie

Short but sweet: Reynolds had condensed the DC comics film, which garnered a mere 26% critical rating on Rotten Tomatoes, down to just 27 seconds

The hilarious re-edit began with Reynolds having his brains blown out all over the film's script by his alter-ego, Deadpool, in a scene cribbed from Deadpool 2

Short but sweet: Reynolds had condensed the DC comics film, which garnered a mere 26% critical rating on Rotten Tomatoes, down to just 27 seconds

The hilarious re-edit began with Reynolds having his brains blown out all over the film’s script by his alter-ego, Deadpool, in a scene cribbed from Deadpool 2.

It then showed the movie in brief, at one point digitally substituting Ryan for Tom Cruise, who did not appear in the movie  but was at one point rumored to take on the role of Hal Jordan.

The ‘Reynolds Cut’ then showed a snippet of the 2017 Justice League movie, which while technically part of the same comic book universe, never featured Reynold’s infamous character.

The A Team: The 'Reynolds Cut' then showed a snippet of the 2017 Justice League movie, which while technically part of the same comic book universe, never featured Reynold's infamous character

The A Team: The ‘Reynolds Cut’ then showed a snippet of the 2017 Justice League movie, which while technically part of the same comic book universe, never featured Reynold’s infamous character

Cuban business owner decries BLM’s ‘mafia tactics’ after letter

Cuban restaurant owner in Louisville reveals how BLM sent him blackmail letter with diversity demands that he was told to meet or risk social media shaming, a public boycott and his storefront ‘f***** with’

  • Dozens of businesses in Louisville, Kentucky, received letters from BLM protesters on July 24 
  • The protesters wrote a list of demands for the businesses that would increase diversity 
  • The list includes ensuring that at least 23% of staff are black and that 23% of the business’s inventory comes from black owned retailers
  • The activists say that the area was unfairly gentrified after the demolition of a housing complex in the 2000s and that it’s time to correct an imbalance 
  • Fernando Martinez claims though one protester told him to agree to the demands or risk having his restaurant ‘f****d with’ 
  • He says while he supports the movement, he won’t be told how to run his business 
  • SCROLL DOWN FOR FULL LIST OF DEMANDS AND ‘REPERCUSSIONS FOR NON-COMPLIANCE’ 

This is the list of demands Martinez and other business owners received 

A Cuban restaurant owner in Louisville is slamming Black Lives Matter activists for sending him and other small business owners a list of diversity demands that they were told to meet or risk repercussions like ‘having their store fronts ‘f****d with’.

The letter went out to business owners in East Market District in Louisville, also known as NuLu, during a protest on July 24 that forced some of the businesses in the area to close.

It demanded that businesses employ at least 23 percent black staff, bought at least 23 percent of their inventory from black retailers or make a recurring donation of 1.5 percent of their net sales to a local black charity, and that they should display a sign showing their support for the movement.  

It also listed a series of ‘repercussions’ if the businesses didn’t comply which included a boycott, social media shaming, and an ‘invasive reclamation’ whereby black owned businesses with competing goods of services would set up ‘booths and tables’ outside the store fronts. 

They say that the neighborhood has been able to flourish after the demolition of a housing project in the 2000s that robbed the black community of opportunities and wiped out their homes. 

Fernando Martinez, who owns La Bodeguita de Mima, claims that one of the activists warned him: ‘You better put the letter on the door so your business is not f*cked with.’ 

On July 24, protesters shut down the neighborhood and, according to Martinez, issued threats to businesses

On July 24, protesters shut down the neighborhood and, according to Martinez, issued threats to businesses

Fernando Martinez, the restaurant owner, and other members of the Cuban community on Sunday protesting against the BLM list of demands

Fernando Martinez, the restaurant owner, and other members of the Cuban community on Sunday protesting against the BLM list of demands 

For the next two days after the protest, he claims he kept his restaurant closed because staff feared for their safety. It meant that more than 30 staff members were not able to earn a paycheck.

He took to Facebook to accuse them of ‘mafia tactics’ and said that while he respects the movement and wants to support it, it’s unfair for his business and safety to be threatened. 

‘There comes a time in life that you have to make a stand and you have to really prove your convictions and what you believe in.  

‘All good people need to denounce this. How can you justified (sic) injustice with more injustice?’ he wrote on Facebook.

On Sunday, he spoke at a rally with other members of the Cuban community to express their support for BLM but also share their position that they shouldn’t be strong-armed into anything. 

This is the letter that BLM activists gave to businesses in the East Market District of Louisville, Kentucky, on July 24

This is the letter that BLM activists gave to businesses in the East Market District of Louisville, Kentucky, on July 24 

‘There are people out there who are trying to define who I am as a man, who I am as a businessman, and who we are as a community.  

‘We need to come together as a community. We’re not an enemy of the Black community. 

‘The Cuban community is not the enemy of the Black community. 

‘La Bodeguita is open to everybody. If you’re gay, this is your home. If you’re Black, this is your home. If you’re White, this is your home. If you’re human, this is your home,’ he said.

Another said: ‘The reason we are here is because the system, because socialism doesn’t work. It doesn’t work.’  

Ahamara Brewster, who belongs to Revolutionary Black Panther Party, also denounced the approach. 

‘You’re attacking a Black-brown establishment, but you’re in the name of Black Lives Matter? Wait a minute, something’s weird about this,’ she said. 

The BLM protesters in Louisville say the list was not a set of demands but that they want to start a conversation with local businesses. 

Some have agreed to their requests, they said. 

Cuban business owner decries BLM’s ‘mafia tactics’ after letter

Cuban restaurant owner in Louisville reveals how BLM sent him blackmail letter with diversity demands that he was told to meet or risk social media shaming, a public boycott and his storefront ‘f***** with’

  • Dozens of businesses in Louisville, Kentucky, received letters from BLM protesters on July 24 
  • The protesters wrote a list of demands for the businesses that would increase diversity 
  • The list includes ensuring that at least 23% of staff are black and that 23% of the business’s inventory comes from black owned retailers
  • The activists say that the area was unfairly gentrified after the demolition of a housing complex in the 2000s and that it’s time to correct an imbalance 
  • Fernando Martinez claims though one protester told him to agree to the demands or risk having his restaurant ‘f****d with’ 
  • He says while he supports the movement, he won’t be told how to run his business 
  • SCROLL DOWN FOR FULL LIST OF DEMANDS AND ‘REPERCUSSIONS FOR NON-COMPLIANCE’ 

This is the list of demands Martinez and other business owners received 

A Cuban restaurant owner in Louisville is slamming Black Lives Matter activists for sending him and other small business owners a list of diversity demands that they were told to meet or risk repercussions like ‘having their store fronts ‘f****d with’.

The letter went out to business owners in East Market District in Louisville, also known as NuLu, during a protest on July 24 that forced some of the businesses in the area to close.

It demanded that businesses employ at least 23 percent black staff, bought at least 23 percent of their inventory from black retailers or make a recurring donation of 1.5 percent of their net sales to a local black charity, and that they should display a sign showing their support for the movement.  

It also listed a series of ‘repercussions’ if the businesses didn’t comply which included a boycott, social media shaming, and an ‘invasive reclamation’ whereby black owned businesses with competing goods of services would set up ‘booths and tables’ outside the store fronts. 

They say that the neighborhood has been able to flourish after the demolition of a housing project in the 2000s that robbed the black community of opportunities and wiped out their homes. 

Fernando Martinez, who owns La Bodeguita de Mima, claims that one of the activists warned him: ‘You better put the letter on the door so your business is not f*cked with.’ 

On July 24, protesters shut down the neighborhood and, according to Martinez, issued threats to businesses

On July 24, protesters shut down the neighborhood and, according to Martinez, issued threats to businesses

Fernando Martinez, the restaurant owner, and other members of the Cuban community on Sunday protesting against the BLM list of demands

Fernando Martinez, the restaurant owner, and other members of the Cuban community on Sunday protesting against the BLM list of demands 

For the next two days after the protest, he claims he kept his restaurant closed because staff feared for their safety. It meant that more than 30 staff members were not able to earn a paycheck.

He took to Facebook to accuse them of ‘mafia tactics’ and said that while he respects the movement and wants to support it, it’s unfair for his business and safety to be threatened. 

‘There comes a time in life that you have to make a stand and you have to really prove your convictions and what you believe in.  

‘All good people need to denounce this. How can you justified (sic) injustice with more injustice?’ he wrote on Facebook.

On Sunday, he spoke at a rally with other members of the Cuban community to express their support for BLM but also share their position that they shouldn’t be strong-armed into anything. 

This is the letter that BLM activists gave to businesses in the East Market District of Louisville, Kentucky, on July 24

This is the letter that BLM activists gave to businesses in the East Market District of Louisville, Kentucky, on July 24 

‘There are people out there who are trying to define who I am as a man, who I am as a businessman, and who we are as a community.  

‘We need to come together as a community. We’re not an enemy of the Black community. 

‘The Cuban community is not the enemy of the Black community. 

‘La Bodeguita is open to everybody. If you’re gay, this is your home. If you’re Black, this is your home. If you’re White, this is your home. If you’re human, this is your home,’ he said.

Another said: ‘The reason we are here is because the system, because socialism doesn’t work. It doesn’t work.’  

Ahamara Brewster, who belongs to Revolutionary Black Panther Party, also denounced the approach. 

‘You’re attacking a Black-brown establishment, but you’re in the name of Black Lives Matter? Wait a minute, something’s weird about this,’ she said. 

The BLM protesters in Louisville say the list was not a set of demands but that they want to start a conversation with local businesses. 

Some have agreed to their requests, they said. 

Police bodycam footage shows George Floyd arrest in detail

Bodycam footage from two cops accused in the murder of George Floyd is revealed exclusively by DailyMail.com today — and it shows a rookie officer terrifying Floyd by pointing a handgun at his head and another callously picking a pebble from the squad car tire just inches from the dying man and seconds before he draws his last breath.

The tapes show in minute detail how a very distressed Floyd begs ‘Mr. Officer, please don’t shoot me. Please man,’ before the struggle that ended with his death on May 25.

It also shows how belligerent cops cursed at and manhandled the sobbing suspect, ignoring his pleas for compassion.

Floyd resisted as the cops tried to force him into the back of the car, telling them he suffers from claustrophobia and anxiety and how Officer Derek Chauvin knelt on his neck for nearly nine minutes, leading to his death, ignoring Floyd’s repeated cries of ‘I can’t breathe.’  

Floyd is even heard predicting his own death. ‘I’ll probably just die this way,’ he says.

Transcripts from the videos were released in mid-July but a judge in Minneapolis had ruled the video could only be viewed in the courthouse, meaning few people have had the chance to watch the powerful images.

But the footage has now been leaked to DailyMail.com so the world can finally see the tragedy of Floyd’s last minutes as the cops were mindless of Floyd’s anguish. 

The footage includes more than 18 minutes from Officer Alex Kueng’s bodycam and 10 minutes from Officer Thomas Lane. They were the first two cops to arrive on the scene after a complaint that Floyd had attempted to pass a fake $20 bill to buy cigarettes at Cup Foods, a store in the Powderhorn Park section of Minneapolis. 

Bodycam footage from two cops accused in the murder of George Floyd is revealed exclusively by DailyMail.com today — and it shows a rookie officer terrifying Floyd by pointing a handgun at his head and another callously picking a pebble from the squad car tire just inches from the dying man and seconds before he draws his last breath on May 25 in Minneapolis  

Floyd is seen sobbing as the officers pull him out of the car and handcuff him, as his ex suggests he was undergoing mental problems and was afraid of police. The tapes show in minute detail how Floyd begs 'Mr. Officer, please don't shoot me. Please man,' before the struggle that ended with his death

Floyd is seen sobbing as the officers pull him out of the car and handcuff him, as his ex suggests he was undergoing mental problems and was afraid of police. The tapes show in minute detail how Floyd begs ‘Mr. Officer, please don’t shoot me. Please man,’ before the struggle that ended with his death

It also shows how Floyd resisted as the cops tried to force him into the back of the car telling them he suffers from claustrophobia and anxiety and how Officer Derek Chauvin (pictured) knelt on his neck for nearly nine minutes, leading to his death, ignoring Floyd's repeated cries of 'I can't breathe'

It also shows how Floyd resisted as the cops tried to force him into the back of the car telling them he suffers from claustrophobia and anxiety and how Officer Derek Chauvin (pictured) knelt on his neck for nearly nine minutes, leading to his death, ignoring Floyd’s repeated cries of ‘I can’t breathe’

The video obtained by DailyMail.com comes from the bodycams of Lane and Alex Kueng, the two cops who were originally called to the scene by Cup Foods' owners. Chauvin (far left) and a fourth officer Tou Thao (second from left) were called in to assist. All were fired the day after Floyd's death. The videos start with Lane, 37, (far right) and Kueng, 26 (second from right) — both in their first week as Minneapolis police officers — entering Cup Foods. A staff member rushes up to them waving the banknote. 'Before they drive off, he's parked right here, it's a fake bill from the gentleman,' he tells the cops

The video obtained by DailyMail.com comes from the bodycams of Lane and Alex Kueng, the two cops who were originally called to the scene by Cup Foods’ owners. Chauvin (far left) and a fourth officer Tou Thao (second from left) were called in to assist. All were fired the day after Floyd’s death. The videos start with Lane, 37, (far right) and Kueng, 26 (second from right) — both in their first week as Minneapolis police officers — entering Cup Foods. A staff member rushes up to them waving the banknote. ‘Before they drive off, he’s parked right here, it’s a fake bill from the gentleman,’ he tells the cops

Chauvin and a fourth officer, Tou Thao, were called in to assist. All four were fired the day after Floyd’s death. 

Chauvin, 44, has been charged with Floyd’s murder and the other three face charges of aiding and abetting murder. The events have led to months of Black Lives Matter protests throughout the country over police racism and brutality.

Floyd was arrested on Memorial Day after allegedly passing a fake $20 bill while buying cigarettes at Cup Foods, a store in the Powderhorn Park section of Minneapolis

Floyd was arrested on Memorial Day after allegedly passing a fake $20 bill while buying cigarettes at Cup Foods, a store in the Powderhorn Park section of Minneapolis

The two officers’ bodycam videos have been filed with Hennepin County District Court by Lane’s defense attorney.

It is clear from the video that Floyd was not trying to run away – he had plenty of time to leave the scene before police arrived. But instead he decided to sit in his car with two friends, giving the cops the opportunity to approach. 

The videos begin with Lane, 37, and Kueng, 26 — both in their first week as Minneapolis police officers — entering Cup Foods. A staff member rushes up to them waving the banknote. ‘Before they drive off. He’s parked right here. It’s a fake bill from the gentleman,’ he tells the cops.

Lane and Kueng then both approach Floyd’s blue Mercedes SUV on the other side of the street. Lane goes to the driver’s side where Floyd is sitting at the wheel and Kueng approaches the passenger side, where Floyd’s ex, Shawanda Hill is in the back seat and a friend, Maurice Hall, is in the front.

Lane is seen knocking on the car window with his flashlight, but Floyd does not immediately open the door. Once the door is open, Lane immediately pulls out his handgun and points it straight at Floyd’s head.

‘Hey man, I’m sorry,’ Floyd says and apologizes again before Lane gets belligerent.

‘Put your f***ing hands up right now! Let me see your other hand,’ the cop is heard saying.

Floyd does not immediately put his hands on the wheel. ‘Put your f***ing hand up there,’ Lane orders him. ‘Jesus Christ, keep your f**king hands on the wheel.’

Floyd tells the officer he had been shot before, and Lane replies: ‘Keep your f***ing hands on the wheel.’

A staff member rushes up to the two officers waving the banknote. 'Before they drive off, he's parked right here, it's a fake bill from the gentleman,' he tells the cops

A staff member rushes up to the two officers waving the banknote. ‘Before they drive off, he’s parked right here, it’s a fake bill from the gentleman,’ he tells the cops

Lane is seen knocking on the car window with his flashlight, but Floyd does not immediately open the door. Once the door is open Lane immediately pulls out his handgun and points it at Floyd's head

Lane is seen knocking on the car window with his flashlight, but Floyd does not immediately open the door. Once the door is open Lane immediately pulls out his handgun and points it at Floyd’s head 

'Hey man, I'm sorry,' Floyd says and apologizes again before Lane gets belligerent. 'Put your f***ing hands up right now! Let me see your other hand,' the cop is heard saying

‘Hey man, I’m sorry,’ Floyd says and apologizes again before Lane gets belligerent. ‘Put your f***ing hands up right now! Let me see your other hand,’ the cop is heard saying

The cop then orders Floyd out of the car, saying: 'Hands on top of your head. Step out of the vehicle and step away from me.' That's when Floyd says: 'Okay. Mr. Officer, please don't shoot me. Please man.' 'I'm not going to shoot you,' Lane says. 'Step out and face away.' 'I'll look at you eye-to-eye. Please don't shoot me man,' Floyd replies. 'I just lost my mom, man'

The cop then orders Floyd out of the car, saying: ‘Hands on top of your head. Step out of the vehicle and step away from me.’ That’s when Floyd says: ‘Okay. Mr. Officer, please don’t shoot me. Please man.’ ‘I’m not going to shoot you,’ Lane says. ‘Step out and face away.’ ‘I’ll look at you eye-to-eye. Please don’t shoot me man,’ Floyd replies. ‘I just lost my mom, man’

Floyd, 46, is seen sobbing as Kueng and Lane pull him out of the car and handcuff him

Floyd, 46, is seen sobbing as Kueng and Lane pull him out of the car and handcuff him

Lane then tells Floyd to put his foot inside the vehicle. ‘I’m sorry, I’m so sorry,’ Floyd replies. ‘God dang man. Man, I got shot the same way, Mr. Officer, before.’

‘Okay. Well when I say ”Let me see your hands,” you put your f***ing hands up,’ Lane responds.

The cop then orders Floyd out of the car. ‘Hands on top of your head. Step out of the vehicle and step away from me,’ he says.

Floyd replies: ‘Okay. Mr. Officer, please don’t shoot me. Please man.’

‘I’m not going to shoot you,’ Lane says. ‘Step out and face away.

‘I’ll look at you eye-to-eye. Please don’t shoot me man,’ Floyd replies. ‘I just lost my mom, man.’

Floyd, 46, is seen sobbing as Kueng and Lane pull him out of the car and handcuff him.

After getting Floyd out of the car, Lane then starts talking to the passengers, Hill and Hall. ‘Why’s he being all squirrelly and not showing us his hands and just being all weird like that?’ Lane asks.

‘Because he’s been shot before,’ Hill, 45, replies.

‘Well I get that,’ Lane says. ‘But still, when officers say: ”Get out of the car…”

‘Is he drunk or something?’

‘No, he’s got a thing going on,’ Hill says, pointing to her head and making a circular movement with her finger as if to suggest her ex had mental problems. ‘About the police,’ she adds. 

It is clear from the video that Floyd had plenty of time to leave the scene before police arrived. But for some reason he decided to sit in his car with two friends, allowing the cops to approach

It is clear from the video that Floyd had plenty of time to leave the scene before police arrived. But for some reason he decided to sit in his car with two friends, allowing the cops to approach

After getting Floyd out of the car, Lane then starts talking to the passengers, Hill and Hall (left and right). 'Why's he being all squirrelly and not showing us his hands and just being all weird like that?' Lane asks. 'Because he's been shot before,' Hill, 45, replies. 'He's got a thing going on,' Hill says, pointing to her head and making a circular movement with her finger as if to suggest her ex had mental problems (pictured). 'About the police,' she adds

After getting Floyd out of the car, Lane then starts talking to the passengers, Hill and Hall (left and right). ‘Why’s he being all squirrelly and not showing us his hands and just being all weird like that?’ Lane asks. ‘Because he’s been shot before,’ Hill, 45, replies. ‘He’s got a thing going on,’ Hill says, pointing to her head and making a circular movement with her finger as if to suggest her ex had mental problems (pictured). ‘About the police,’ she adds

The two officers then walk Floyd to the squad car and that is when the struggle really begins as he refuses to get in saying he has claustrophobia. He falls to the ground. 'Stand up. Stop falling down,' Kueng shouts. 'Stay on your feet and face the car door.' 'Please man. Don't leave me by myself man, please. I'm just claustrophobic,' Floyd begs

The two officers then walk Floyd to the squad car and that is when the struggle really begins as he refuses to get in saying he has claustrophobia. He falls to the ground. ‘Stand up. Stop falling down,’ Kueng shouts. ‘Stay on your feet and face the car door.’ ‘Please man. Don’t leave me by myself man, please. I’m just claustrophobic,’ Floyd begs

'Y'all, I am going to die in here,' Floyd protests. 'I'm going to die, man. I just had COVID, man. I don't want to go back to that.' Lane offers to roll the cruiser's windows down to help his phobia but Floyd is still seen to struggle. 'I'm scared as f**k,' he says

‘Y’all, I am going to die in here,’ Floyd protests. ‘I’m going to die, man. I just had COVID, man. I don’t want to go back to that.’ Lane offers to roll the cruiser’s windows down to help his phobia but Floyd is still seen to struggle. ‘I’m scared as f**k,’ he says

While still in the car, Floyd says for the first time the line that has become synonymous with his death. 'I can't breathe.' Shortly afterwards Chauvin and Thao arrive on the scene

While still in the car, Floyd says for the first time the line that has become synonymous with his death. ‘I can’t breathe.’ Shortly afterwards Chauvin and Thao arrive on the scene

The two officers then walk Floyd to the squad car and the struggle really begins when Floyd refuses to get in, saying he has claustrophobia. 

He falls to the ground. ‘Stand up. Stop falling down,’ Kueng shouts. ‘Stay on your feet and face the car door.’

‘Please man. Don’t leave me by myself man, please. I’m just claustrophobic.’

‘Well you’re still going in the car,’ Lane says.

‘Y’all, I am going to die in here,’ Floyd protests. ‘I’m going to die, man. I just had COVID, man. I don’t want to go back to that.’

Lane offers to roll the cruiser’s windows down to help his phobia but Floyd still struggles. ‘I’m scared as f***,’ he says.

A bystander tells Floyd to calm down because he cannot win in the situation he is in. ‘I don’t want to win,’ Floyd says. ‘I’m claustrophobic and I’ve got anxiety. I don’t want to do nothing to them.’

While still in the car, Floyd says for the first time the line that has become synonymous with his death. ‘I can’t breathe.’ Shortly afterwards Chauvin and Thao arrive on the scene.

The officers finally get him in the squad car and close the rear driver’s side door behind him, but for a reason that is not clear from the video, Floyd comes out of the passenger side door still struggling.

Within seconds he is lying on the sidewalk with Chauvin’s knee pressed on his neck and Lane and Kueng helping to restrain him. 

He says he can’t breathe over and over again and calls for his ‘momma’ but his voice slowly gets weaker as his life drains away. 

‘Tell my kids I love them. I’m dead,’ he says at one point. 

The officers finally get Floyd in the squad car and close the rear driver's side door behind him, but for a reason that is not clear from the video, he comes out of the passenger side door still struggling

The officers finally get Floyd in the squad car and close the rear driver’s side door behind him, but for a reason that is not clear from the video, he comes out of the passenger side door still struggling

Within seconds he is lying on the sidewalk with Chauvin's knee on his neck. He says he can't breathe over and over again and calls for his 'momma' but his voice slowly gets weaker as his life drains away

Within seconds he is lying on the sidewalk with Chauvin’s knee on his neck. He says he can’t breathe over and over again and calls for his ‘momma’ but his voice slowly gets weaker as his life drains away

When Floyd continues to say he can't breathe, Kueng is heard telling him. 'You're fine. You're talking fine.' Floyd replies: 'I'll probably just die this way.' 'I'm through,' Floyd says. 'I'm claustrophobic. My stomach hurts. My neck hurts. Everything hurts. I need some water or something, please'

When Floyd continues to say he can’t breathe, Kueng is heard telling him. ‘You’re fine. You’re talking fine.’ Floyd replies: ‘I’ll probably just die this way.’ ‘I’m through,’ Floyd says. ‘I’m claustrophobic. My stomach hurts. My neck hurts. Everything hurts. I need some water or something, please’

Kueng is seen nonchalantly picking a pebble from the squad car tire with his right hand as he restrains Floyd's legs with his left

Kueng is seen nonchalantly picking a pebble from the squad car tire with his right hand as he restrains Floyd’s legs with his left

As Floyd stops moving Chauvin keeps his knee on his neck, despite complaints from a small crowd that has gathered. 'Check his pulse,' one man says repeatedly. 'You call what you are doing okay?' Pictured: Kueng picking a pebble from the tire

As Floyd stops moving Chauvin keeps his knee on his neck, despite complaints from a small crowd that has gathered. ‘Check his pulse,’ one man says repeatedly. ‘You call what you are doing okay?’ Pictured: Kueng picking a pebble from the tire

The rookie cop callously picked a pebble from the squad car tire just inches from the dying man and seconds before Floyd draws his last breath

The rookie cop callously picked a pebble from the squad car tire just inches from the dying man and seconds before Floyd draws his last breath

But the other officers do little to stop Chauvin. At one point Lane asks: 'Should we roll him on his side?' But Chauvin replies. 'No, he's staying where we've got him.' 'Okay,' Lane says. 'I just worry about the excited delirium or whatever.' 'Well, that's why we got the ambulance coming,' says Chauvin. By the time EMTs arrive, Floyd is dead

But the other officers do little to stop Chauvin. At one point Lane asks: ‘Should we roll him on his side?’ But Chauvin replies. ‘No, he’s staying where we’ve got him.’ ‘Okay,’ Lane says. ‘I just worry about the excited delirium or whatever.’ ‘Well, that’s why we got the ambulance coming,’ says Chauvin. By the time EMTs arrive, Floyd is dead

Kueng is seen nonchalantly picking a pebble from the squad car tire with his right hand as he restrains Floyd’s legs with his left.

As his knee presses the life out of Floyd, Chauvin, the most senior officer on the scene, asks rookies Lane and Kueng if they are okay. ‘My knee might be a little scratched but I will survive,’ Lane answers.

Thao asks his fellow officers whether Floyd is high.

‘I believe so. We found a pipe,’ Kueng replies. Lane says: ‘We found a weed pipe. There might be something else, there might be like PCP or something.’ 

When Floyd continues to wail that he can’t breathe, Kueng is heard telling him. ‘You’re fine. You’re talking fine.’

 Floyd replies: ‘I’ll probably just die this way.’

‘I’m through,’ Floyd says. ‘I’m claustrophobic. My stomach hurts. My neck hurts. Everything hurts. I need some water or something, please.’

‘Then stop talking. Stop yelling,’ Chauvin replies. ‘It takes a heck of a lot of oxygen to talk.’

As Floyd stops moving Chauvin keeps his knee on his neck, despite complaints from a small crowd that has gathered.

‘Check his pulse,’ one man says repeatedly. ‘You call what you are doing okay?

But the other officers do little to stop Chauvin. At one point Lane asks: ‘Should we roll him on his side?’ But Chauvin replies. ‘No, he’s staying where we’ve got him.’

‘Okay,’ Lane says. ‘I just worry about the excited delirium or whatever.’

‘Well, that’s why we got the ambulance coming,’ Chauvin says.

By the time EMTs arrive, George Floyd is dead. 

Israel supporters slam Seth Rogen over Jewish state remarks

Seth Rogen, who is Jewish, drew criticism over his remarks about Israel this week

Seth Rogen is facing backlash from supporters of Israel after saying that he was fed a ‘huge amount of lies’ about the country as a child and didn’t know the Jewish state was created where Palestinians were already living.

The Hollywood actor, who attended Jewish schools and camps growing up in Canada, opened up this week about his Jewish heritage in an interview on the WTF with Marc Maron podcast. 

‘As a Jewish person I was fed a huge amount of lies about Israel my entire life,’ the actor said of his experience in Jewish schools.

‘They never tell you that, “Oh, by the way, there were people there”. They make it seem like it was just like sitting there, like the f***ing door’s open. They forget to include the fact to every young Jewish person.’

More than 700,000 Palestinians fled during the 1948 war that led to the creation of Israel, according to UN estimates. 

The remarks drew strong backlash from pro-Israel quarters, however. ‘So should 9 m. Israelis just turn off the lights & call it quits?’ tweeted David Harris, CEO of the American Jewish Committee. 

Rogan (right) was speaking with Jewish comedian Marc Maron (left) when he made the controversial remarks

Rogan (right) was speaking with Jewish comedian Marc Maron (left) when he made the controversial remarks

‘Forget age-old links & prayers? Forget the refuge given to millions of Jews? Forget sovereignty? All just to make cosseted Rogen happy?’ added Harris.

Others questioned Rogen’s remarks about whether Israel makes sense as a refuge for Jewish people. 

Rogen said on the podcast: ‘If it is for truly the preservation of Jewish people, it makes no sense, because again, you don’t keep something you’re trying to preserve all in one place – especially when that place is proven to be pretty volatile, you know?’

Shiri Moshe, a foreign policy analyst, tweeted: ‘Lots to unpack in Seth Rogen’s claims, but the argument that Israel makes “no sense” as a means of preserving Jewish life is particularly ludicrous.’

Moshe said that Israel served as a refuge for ‘airlifted Iraqi, Yemenite and Ethiopian Jews found a safe haven, along with the majority of Mizrachi refugees.’

‘And to argue that Israel is “pretty volatile” and therefore unsafe for Jews – by that measure, considering Jewish history, most of the world should be off-limits to us. Such nonsense,’ Moshe added.,

Lahav Harkov, an Israeli journalist, tweeted: ‘I feel like @Sethrogen’s comments are made from a position of really, really great privilege – and ignorance – if he can’t understand why Israel makes sense to millions of Jews around the world. I just hope he appreciates it.’

Another Jewish Israeli journalist, Shoshanna Keats Jaskoll, wrote that Rogen’s remarks were the result of ‘the propoganda [sic] of the anti Israel movement.’

The 38-year-old actor was being interviewed to promote his new film The American Pickle. The comedy centers on a Jewish immigrant in the 1920s who falls into a vat of pickle brine, is preserved for 100 years and wakes up in modern-day Brooklyn

The 38-year-old actor was being interviewed to promote his new film The American Pickle. The comedy centers on a Jewish immigrant in the 1920s who falls into a vat of pickle brine, is preserved for 100 years and wakes up in modern-day Brooklyn

Some pro-Palestinian groups applauded Rogen's remarks, however

Some pro-Palestinian groups applauded Rogen’s remarks, however

However, pro-Palestinian groups and critics of Israel applauded Rogen’s remarks on the divisive subject.

‘Thanks @Sethrogen for criticising the colonial myths about Israel’s creation. 700,000 Palestinians were ethnically cleansed by Israeli apartheid,’ tweeted the Palestinian Campaign for the Academic and Cultural Boycott of Israel, a group supporting the controversial ‘Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions’ movement. 

Both Rogen and Maron, who is also Jewish, said in the podcast that they would never live in Israel.

Maron acknowledged: ‘We’re gonna p**s off a bunch of Jews.’

Following the podcast, Rogen has made limited comments about the controversy, but in replying to one critical tweet he wrote: ‘I’ve been to Israel a few times. My parents met there.’

In another reply to an angry remark, he tweeted: ‘For a Jewish person, you really can’t take a joke.’ 

Rogen, a 38-year-old actor, was speaking to fellow comedian Maron to promote his new film The American Pickle.

The comedy centers on a Jewish immigrant in the 1920s who falls into a vat of pickle brine, is preserved for 100 years and wakes up in modern-day Brooklyn.  

Israel supporters slam Seth Rogen over Jewish state remarks

Seth Rogen, who is Jewish, drew criticism over his remarks about Israel this week

Seth Rogen is facing backlash from supporters of Israel after saying that he was fed a ‘huge amount of lies’ about the country as a child and didn’t know the Jewish state was created where Palestinians were already living.

The Hollywood actor, who attended Jewish schools and camps growing up in Canada, opened up this week about his Jewish heritage in an interview on the WTF with Marc Maron podcast. 

‘As a Jewish person I was fed a huge amount of lies about Israel my entire life,’ the actor said of his experience in Jewish schools.

‘They never tell you that, “Oh, by the way, there were people there”. They make it seem like it was just like sitting there, like the f***ing door’s open. They forget to include the fact to every young Jewish person.’

More than 700,000 Palestinians fled during the 1948 war that led to the creation of Israel, according to UN estimates. 

The remarks drew strong backlash from pro-Israel quarters, however. ‘So should 9 m. Israelis just turn off the lights & call it quits?’ tweeted David Harris, CEO of the American Jewish Committee. 

Rogan (right) was speaking with Jewish comedian Marc Maron (left) when he made the controversial remarks

Rogan (right) was speaking with Jewish comedian Marc Maron (left) when he made the controversial remarks

‘Forget age-old links & prayers? Forget the refuge given to millions of Jews? Forget sovereignty? All just to make cosseted Rogen happy?’ added Harris.

Others questioned Rogen’s remarks about whether Israel makes sense as a refuge for Jewish people. 

Rogen said on the podcast: ‘If it is for truly the preservation of Jewish people, it makes no sense, because again, you don’t keep something you’re trying to preserve all in one place – especially when that place is proven to be pretty volatile, you know?’

Shiri Moshe, a foreign policy analyst, tweeted: ‘Lots to unpack in Seth Rogen’s claims, but the argument that Israel makes “no sense” as a means of preserving Jewish life is particularly ludicrous.’

Moshe said that Israel served as a refuge for ‘airlifted Iraqi, Yemenite and Ethiopian Jews found a safe haven, along with the majority of Mizrachi refugees.’

‘And to argue that Israel is “pretty volatile” and therefore unsafe for Jews – by that measure, considering Jewish history, most of the world should be off-limits to us. Such nonsense,’ Moshe added.,

Lahav Harkov, an Israeli journalist, tweeted: ‘I feel like @Sethrogen’s comments are made from a position of really, really great privilege – and ignorance – if he can’t understand why Israel makes sense to millions of Jews around the world. I just hope he appreciates it.’

Another Jewish Israeli journalist, Shoshanna Keats Jaskoll, wrote that Rogen’s remarks were the result of ‘the propoganda [sic] of the anti Israel movement.’

The 38-year-old actor was being interviewed to promote his new film The American Pickle. The comedy centers on a Jewish immigrant in the 1920s who falls into a vat of pickle brine, is preserved for 100 years and wakes up in modern-day Brooklyn

The 38-year-old actor was being interviewed to promote his new film The American Pickle. The comedy centers on a Jewish immigrant in the 1920s who falls into a vat of pickle brine, is preserved for 100 years and wakes up in modern-day Brooklyn

Some pro-Palestinian groups applauded Rogen's remarks, however

Some pro-Palestinian groups applauded Rogen’s remarks, however

However, pro-Palestinian groups and critics of Israel applauded Rogen’s remarks on the divisive subject.

‘Thanks @Sethrogen for criticising the colonial myths about Israel’s creation. 700,000 Palestinians were ethnically cleansed by Israeli apartheid,’ tweeted the Palestinian Campaign for the Academic and Cultural Boycott of Israel, a group supporting the controversial ‘Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions’ movement. 

Both Rogen and Maron, who is also Jewish, said in the podcast that they would never live in Israel.

Maron acknowledged: ‘We’re gonna p**s off a bunch of Jews.’

Following the podcast, Rogen has made limited comments about the controversy, but in replying to one critical tweet he wrote: ‘I’ve been to Israel a few times. My parents met there.’

In another reply to an angry remark, he tweeted: ‘For a Jewish person, you really can’t take a joke.’ 

Rogen, a 38-year-old actor, was speaking to fellow comedian Maron to promote his new film The American Pickle.

The comedy centers on a Jewish immigrant in the 1920s who falls into a vat of pickle brine, is preserved for 100 years and wakes up in modern-day Brooklyn.  

Bronx Zoo apologizes for racist past – including caging man

The organization that runs New York’s Bronx Zoo has issued an apology over its racist past, including when it caged an African man in the monkey house for three days in 1906.

The apology came Wednesday after the Wildlife Conservation Society, or WCS, had begun digging into the zoo’s past for an upcoming 125th anniversary, and in light of George Floyd’s killing.  

‘In the name of equality, transparency, and accountability, we must confront our organization’s historic role in promoting racial injustice as we advance our mission to save wildlife and wild places,’ WCS officials said in a released statement.

The officials cited specific instances of ‘unconscionable racial intolerance,’ including the treatment of Ota Benga, a young man from the Mbuti people of what is now the Democratic Republic of Congo. 

Benga, who stood at 4-feet, 8-inches, was put on display in a cage in the monkey house for several days in September 1906. 

As a decorative custom of his tribe in the Congo, Ota’s teeth had been filed into sharp points, a feature the zoo used to promote him as a wild man.

A sign was hung over the cage that read, ‘The Missing Link.’ 

The organization that runs the Bronx Zoo issued an apology over its racist past, including when an African man named Ota Benga (pictured) was caged in the monkey house in 1906 

As a decorative custom of his tribe in the Congo, Ota's teeth had been filed into sharp points, a feature the zoo used to promote him as a wild man. A sign was hung over the cage that read, 'The Missing Link.'

As a decorative custom of his tribe in the Congo, Ota’s teeth had been filed into sharp points, a feature the zoo used to promote him as a wild man. A sign was hung over the cage that read, ‘The Missing Link.’ 

A baby chimp sat at the bottom of the enclosure, a single companion to the boy.

The New York Times reported at the time that visitors had come to see the ‘the wild man from Africa’. 

‘They chased him about the grounds all day, howling, jeering, and yelling. Some of them poked him in the ribs, others tripped him up, all laughed at him’, the report read. 

Benga was brought to America in 1904, when showman anthropologist William McGee conceived the idea of a human zoo, to be held in St Louis. 

McGee’s grandson, Phillips Verner, returned with Benga and five other Mbuti, after a trip to the African jungle.

The six were sent to St Louis by rail, where they became McGee’s most important exhibits, the centerpiece of the St Louis World Fair, and were feted by society and academics alike.

Outa Benga, a Central African man, was caged in the Bronx Zoo's monkey house (pictured) for several days in September 1906

Outa Benga, a Central African man, was caged in the Bronx Zoo’s monkey house (pictured) for several days in September 1906 

Five of the Mbuti then returned to Africa, but Benga was brought to New York with Verner, where he was provided accommodation in a spare room at the American Museum of Natural History.

Soon, however, he came to the attention of William Hornaday, a conservationist and director of the Bronx Zoo. 

Zoo founder Madison Grant (pictured) offered to take charge of Benga, who initially believed he would be looking after the Bronx Zoo's elephants

Zoo founder Madison Grant (pictured) offered to take charge of Benga, who initially believed he would be looking after the Bronx Zoo’s elephants

Hornaday and zoo founder Madison Grant offered to take charge of Benga, who initially believed he would be looking after the Bronx Zoo’s elephants.

In fact, he was going to be put on public display as a living example of ‘racial inferiority’. 

Immediately, the monkey house exhibition prompted criticism.

WCS who issued the apology Wednesday noted that outrage from Black ministers ‘brought the disgraceful incident to an end.’ 

Benga later went from the zoo to an orphanage in Brooklyn and then to Lynchburg, Virginia, where he worked in a tobacco factory. He died by suicide in 1916. The monkey house was permanently closed in 2012.

An online petition has been started to pressure the zoo to create a memorial plaque and have it placed in the very same place Benga was held in captivity. 

‘After all, it is their responsibility,’ the online petition posted by the Ota Benga Memorial Group reads. 

An online petition has been started to pressure the zoo to create a memorial plaque and have it placed in the very same place Benga was 'held in captivity' by the

The Ota Benga Memorial Group wants to have a plaque erected where the African man was ‘held in captivity. The cover page from the group’s website is pictured

The organization’s website describes it as a ‘student-led, student-run, and student-oriented group’. 

The petition has been up for at least 8 months, but so far only has 347 supporters. Its goal is to reach 10,000. 

‘This was an atrocity and needs to be shared nationwide if not worldwide. I have brought my own child to the Bronx Zoo and I’ve grown up going there myself and had no knowledge of this. His family deserves justice and, at the very least, some type of reparations,’ wrote supporter Theresa L. of New York in a post made Thursday, a day after the WCS apology was made.  

A petition to pressure the Bronx Zoo (pictured) to create a memorial for Ota Benga has a goal of attracting 10,000 supporters

 A petition to pressure the Bronx Zoo (pictured) to create a memorial for Ota Benga has a goal of attracting 10,000 supporters

Conservation society officials also condemned the ‘eugenics-based, pseudoscientific racism’ promoted by Grant and another founder, Henry Fairfield Osborn Sr.

Eugenics, a movement promoting selective human breeding to weed out characteristics seen as undesirable, had many adherents in the early decades of the 20th century and was influential in shaping Nazi policies. 

Excerpts from Bronx Zoo founder Madison Grant's book 'The Passing of the Great Race' were included in a defense exhibit for one of the defendants in the Nuremberg trials

Excerpts from Bronx Zoo founder Madison Grant’s book ‘The Passing of the Great Race’ were included in a defense exhibit for one of the defendants in the Nuremberg trials

Excerpts from Grant’s book ‘The Passing of the Great Race’ were included in a defense exhibit for one of the defendants in the Nuremberg trials, zoo officials said.

‘We deeply regret that many people and generations have been hurt by these actions or by our failure previously to publicly condemn and denounce them,’ the officials said in the statement, The New York Times reported. 

Grant had set out to promote ‘scientific racism’, and was known to speak of ‘purity of type’, and the survival of the white master race.

In 1930, after his book was translated into German, he received a letter from Adolf Hitler, who at the time was still an aspiring politician. 

Hitler wrote in the letter, ‘your book is my bible’. He would go on to employ ‘scientific racism’ as the foundation for the Third Reich, giving academic grounding to the Holocaust.

Trump threatens to send National Guard to Portland if violent protests continue

President Donald Trump has threatened to deploy the National Guard to quell Portland protests in an apparent attempt to save face hours after he backed down and agreed to remove federal troops from the city. 

Trump once again decried ‘agitators and anarchists’ in Portland during an address in Midland, Texas, on Wednesday afternoon following the announcement that the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) will begin a phased withdrawal of federal officers on Thursday after almost a month of nightly violent clashes outside the city’s courthouse. 

The president praised the officers’ efforts before warning that he will take even stronger action if the unrest continues after they leave.  

‘If they don’t solve that problem locally very soon, we’re going to send in the National Guard and get it solved very quickly, just like we did in Minneapolis and just like we will do in other places,’ he said.  

‘They want to solve their problem, they’ve got a very short time to do it, but they’ll either solve their problem or we send in the National Guard.’ 

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President Donald Trump threatened to deploy the National Guard to quell Portland protests during a speech in Midland, Texas on Wednesday afternoon – hours after he backed down and agreed to remove federal troops from the city

A protester taunts federal officers after being shot with less-lethal munitions outside the Mark O. Hatfield federal courthouse after an unlawful assembly was declared Tuesday night

A protester taunts federal officers after being shot with less-lethal munitions outside the Mark O. Hatfield federal courthouse after an unlawful assembly was declared Tuesday night 

A mortar round thrown by protesters explodes amidst federal officers in downtown Portland Tuesday night

A mortar round thrown by protesters explodes amidst federal officers in downtown Portland Tuesday night 

Trump made the comments during a speech on restoring energy dominance in the Permian Basin, where he railed against liberals for trying to regulate the area’s oil industry. 

He segued into the protests in an awkward fashion by charging that eliminating methods such as fracking could turn the US into Venezuela. He said the US ‘isn’t far from that – just look at Portland’. 

Trump expressed similar sentiments about the situation in Portland in a pair of tweets ahead of the speech, writing: ‘If the Federal Government and its brilliant Law Enforcement (Homeland) didn’t go into Portland one week ago, there would be no Portland — It would be burned and beaten to the ground,’ he wrote.

‘If the Mayor and Governor do not stop the Crime and Violence from the Anarchists and Agitators immediately, the Federal Government will go in and do the job that local law enforcement was supposed to do!’

The tweets came just after Oregon Gov Kate Brown confirmed that the federal government had agreed to remove agents from Portland if officials secure the city and its Mark O Hatfield federal courthouse, where the height of the violence has occurred. 

 

Just before Trump's tweets, Oregon Gov Kate Brown (left) confirmed in a statement that the federal government agreed to withdraw agents from Portland

Just before Trump’s tweets, Oregon Gov Kate Brown (left) confirmed in a statement that the federal government agreed to withdraw agents from Portland

‘Beginning Thursday, all Customs and Border Protection and ICE officers will leave downtown Portland, and shortly thereafter will begin going home,’ Brown said in a statement.

The DHS said it had signed on to the joint plan to end the violence in which state and local law enforcement would begin to secure areas around federal properties.

In a statement, DHS Acting Secretary Chad Wolf said that the ‘department will continue to maintain our current, augmented federal law enforcement personnel in Portland until we are assured that the Hatfield Federal Courthouse and other federal properties will no longer be attacked and that the seat of justice in Portland will remain secure’.  

Trump had said earlier on Wednesday that federal agents will not be leaving Portland until local officials rid it of ‘anarchists and agitators’.

‘We’re not leaving until they secure their city. If they don’t secure their city soon, we have no choice. We’re gonna have to go in and clean it out,’ the president told reporters ahead of his flight to Texas.  

‘So in Portland, they either clean out their city and do the job and get rid of the anarchists and agitators, which is what they are. They’re not protesters. 

‘They either clean out their city and do it right or we’re going to have to do it for them.’ 

At the Midland event Trump specified how he intended to intervene in the future – by sending in the federal National Guard.  

The president has made the same threat on multiple occasions in the two months since protests broke out nationwide over the May 25 death of George Floyd, a black man who was killed when a white Minneapolis cop kneeled on his neck during an arrest.

In the first few weeks of protests he did send troops to several US cities, but they were only allowed to serve as support for law enforcement and did not have any power to arrest or detain citizens. 

To give them those powers Trump would have to invoke the Insurrection Act of 1807, which allows the president to deploy troops when federal laws cannot be properly enforced. 

Trump signaled his intent to invoke the act last month but never followed through amid a debate over whether he could do so without consent from governors, most of whom said they did not want troops in their cities.  

Protesters face off with federal officers in downtown Portland after an unlawful assembly was declared Tuesday night

Protesters face off with federal officers in downtown Portland after an unlawful assembly was declared Tuesday night 

Several moms stand behind protesters holding shields during another night of protests in downtown Portland

Several moms stand behind protesters holding shields during another night of protests in downtown Portland 

One protester is seen holding up a shield to protect himself from less-lethal munitions fired by federal agents

One protester is seen holding up a shield to protect himself from less-lethal munitions fired by federal agents  

A demonstrator flashes a peace sign at federal officers during a Black Lives Matter protest at the Mark O. Hatfield United States Courthouse early Wednesday morning

A demonstrator flashes a peace sign at federal officers during a Black Lives Matter protest at the Mark O. Hatfield United States Courthouse early Wednesday morning

Mothers face off with federal law enforcement officers during a demonstration against police violence and racial inequality in Portland Tuesday night

Mothers face off with federal law enforcement officers during a demonstration against police violence and racial inequality in Portland Tuesday night 

Federal officers advance on retreating demonstrators after an illegal assembly was declared during a Black Lives Matter protest at the Mark O. Hatfield United States Courthouse

Federal officers advance on retreating demonstrators after an illegal assembly was declared during a Black Lives Matter protest at the Mark O. Hatfield United States Courthouse

Demonstrators retreat as federal officers launch tear gas on them during a Black Lives Matter protest at the Mark O. Hatfield United States Courthouse early Wednesday morning

Demonstrators retreat as federal officers launch tear gas on them during a Black Lives Matter protest at the Mark O. Hatfield United States Courthouse early Wednesday morning 

The talks between the White House and Oregon began on Tuesday, a day after the US Marshals Service and the DHS debated whether to send in more agents. 

The marshals were taking steps to identify up to 100 additional personnel who could go in case they were needed to relieve or supplement the deputy marshals who work in Oregon, spokesman Drew Wade said. 

On Tuesday, Portland officials also announced their own action against the deployment of troops by fining the federal government until it removes an unpermitted fence around the Mark O. Hatfield courthouse. 

Portland Commissioner Chloe Eudaly announced fines on the fence that was set up without permission.

Eudaly said the government hasn’t responded to a cease and desist demand on behalf of the city sent last week and said the bill against the federal government is now $192,000 ‘and counting’ as of Monday night. 

‘We intend to collect,’ she said. ‘Typically, we would send a maintenance crew or contractor to remove such an obstruction, but I will not send workers into harm’s way,’ she said. 

Protests in Portland have spiraled out of control since the death of George Floyd in May, prompting the federal government to intervene and send in troops

Protests in Portland have spiraled out of control since the death of George Floyd in May, prompting the federal government to intervene and send in troops

Demonstrators hold placards reading 'Black Lives Matter' and 'Cops are paid to protect not murder' during a protests

Demonstrators hold placards reading ‘Black Lives Matter’ and ‘Cops are paid to protect not murder’ during a protests 

Protest in the Portland entered their 62nd night on Tuesday as federal authorities attempt to quell the civil unrest plaguing the city

Protest in the Portland entered their 62nd night on Tuesday as federal authorities attempt to quell the civil unrest plaguing the city 

Demonstrator Teal Lindseth uses a megaphone during a protest against racial inequality and police violence on Tuesday night

Demonstrator Teal Lindseth uses a megaphone during a protest against racial inequality and police violence on Tuesday night

The protests have shown no sign of stopping despite the U.S. Marshals Service and Department of Homeland Security weighing whether to send in more agents

The protests have shown no sign of stopping despite the U.S. Marshals Service and Department of Homeland Security weighing whether to send in more agents 

‘Yes, I am afraid to direct workers to do their job and enforce our laws against the federal government—I hope that gives everyone reading this pause,’ she added.

According to the transportation bureau’s rules, which Eudaly oversees, it can assess a maximum $500 fine for obstructing the public right of way without a permit and levy a charge every 15 minutes, hourly, daily, weekly or monthly, according to Oregon Live.

The fence has become the heart of evening protests, which have broken out in the city for months following the death of George Floyd at the hands of Minneapolis police officers. 

Protesters have hit the streets demanding an end to racial injustice and police brutality.

The demonstrations have escalated into violence with protesters throwing rocks, Molotov cocktails, fireworks and laser pointers at the federal courthouse. 

Crowds gathered outside the Mark O. Hatfield courthouse on Tuesday where the federal government installed a protective fence

Crowds gathered outside the Mark O. Hatfield courthouse on Tuesday where the federal government installed a protective fence 

Hundreds of protesters gathered to listen to Native American speakers outside the Multnomah County Justice Center

Hundreds of protesters gathered to listen to Native American speakers outside the Multnomah County Justice Center 

Recent protests have escalated into violence with protesters throwing rocks, Molotov cocktails, fireworks and laser pointers at the federal courthouse

Recent protests have escalated into violence with protesters throwing rocks, Molotov cocktails, fireworks and laser pointers at the federal courthouse

Portland officials announced Tuesday the city is fining the federal government $500 every 15 minutes for erecting an unauthorized fence surround the federal court house and the Justice Center in downtown Portland

Portland officials announced Tuesday the city is fining the federal government $500 every 15 minutes for erecting an unauthorized fence surround the federal court house and the Justice Center in downtown Portland

Protesters attempted to push over the fence set up by federal agents above on Friday

Protesters attempted to push over the fence set up by federal agents above on Friday

A fire burns behind a fence as protesters gather at the Justice Center and Federal Courthouse on Monday evening. Protests have only worsened with the deployment of federal agents to Portland

A fire burns behind a fence as protesters gather at the Justice Center and Federal Courthouse on Monday evening. Protests have only worsened with the deployment of federal agents to Portland

Demonstrators are seen holding up umbrellas for protection against less-lethal munitions outside the Portland courthouse Tuesday night

Demonstrators are seen holding up umbrellas for protection against less-lethal munitions outside the Portland courthouse Tuesday night 

People gather for a demonstration in front of the Mark O. Hatfield federal courthouse in downtown Portland on Tuesday

People gather for a demonstration in front of the Mark O. Hatfield federal courthouse in downtown Portland on Tuesday 

Federal police clean in front of the Mark O. Hatfield federal courthouse in downtown Portland as the city experiences another night of unrest

Federal police clean in front of the Mark O. Hatfield federal courthouse in downtown Portland as the city experiences another night of unrest

Portland Commissioner Chloe Eudaly announced Tuesday that the city of Portland is assessing a maximum fine of $500 for every 15 minutes that the unauthorized fence set up by federal agents remains standing

Portland Commissioner Chloe Eudaly announced Tuesday that the city of Portland is assessing a maximum fine of $500 for every 15 minutes that the unauthorized fence set up by federal agents remains standing

Federal agents have responded with tear gas, less-lethal ammunition and arrests. 

Despite the clashes between agents and civilians, Trump has touted their deployment as a success.

‘We, as you know, have done an excellent job of watching over Portland and watching our courthouse where they wanted to burn it down, they’re anarchists, nothing short of anarchist agitators,’ Trump said Tuesday. 

‘And we have protected it very powerfully. And if we didn’t go there, I will tell you, you wouldn’t have a courthouse. You’d have a billion-dollar burned-out building.’

US Attorney General William Barr has also defended the aggressive federal response to Congress, saying ‘violent rioters and anarchists have hijacked legitimate protests’ sparked by Floyd´s death.

On Monday the feud between troops and city officials only inflamed when the Trump administration announced they’ll send in additional federal agents to the city, despite demands from elected representatives and lawsuits against the deployment.

Now Oregon state leaders are advocating for a ban on tear gas, limits on munitions and legislation to require officers display their names and ID numbers in the upcoming special session in the State Legislature.

Federal law enforcement officials pictured aiming at protesters standing outside a fence they set up around the Justice Center and Federal Courthouse in Portland on Friday

Federal law enforcement officials pictured aiming at protesters standing outside a fence they set up around the Justice Center and Federal Courthouse in Portland on Friday

Demonstrators hold signs during a Black Lives Matter protest at the Mark O. Hatfield United States Courthouse Monday in Portland, Oregon

Demonstrators hold signs during a Black Lives Matter protest at the Mark O. Hatfield United States Courthouse Monday in Portland, Oregon

Members of the 'Wall of Moms' protest group lock arms as they are tear-gassed by federal officers during a Black Lives Matter protest at the Portland courthouse on Monday

Members of the ‘Wall of Moms’ protest group lock arms as they are tear-gassed by federal officers during a Black Lives Matter protest at the Portland courthouse on Monday

A demonstrator holds a sign in front of a fire during a Black Lives Matter protest at the Mark O. Hatfield United States Courthouse Tuesday in Portland

A demonstrator holds a sign in front of a fire during a Black Lives Matter protest at the Mark O. Hatfield United States Courthouse Tuesday in Portland

A demonstrator kicks a tear gas canister back at federal officers during a Black Lives Matter protest at the Mark O. Hatfield United States Courthouse early Wednesday morning

A demonstrator kicks a tear gas canister back at federal officers during a Black Lives Matter protest at the Mark O. Hatfield United States Courthouse early Wednesday morning 

A protester walks through tear gas deployed by federal law enforcement officers during a demonstration against police violence and racial inequality in Portland early Wednesday morning

A protester walks through tear gas deployed by federal law enforcement officers during a demonstration against police violence and racial inequality in Portland early Wednesday morning 

Federal officers are surrounded by smoke as they push back demonstrators during a Black Lives Matter protest at the Mark O. Hatfield United States Courthouse early Wednesday morning

Federal officers are surrounded by smoke as they push back demonstrators during a Black Lives Matter protest at the Mark O. Hatfield United States Courthouse early Wednesday morning 

Several moms join together to block a Department of Homeland Security SUV from pursuing street protesters as they clash with federal officers Tuesday night

Several moms join together to block a Department of Homeland Security SUV from pursuing street protesters as they clash with federal officers Tuesday night 

People gather in protest in front of the Mark O. Hatfield federal courthouse in downtown Portland as the city experiences another night of unrest

People gather in protest in front of the Mark O. Hatfield federal courthouse in downtown Portland as the city experiences another night of unrest 

‘Our federal delegation has pushed for DOJ and DHS Inspectors General to investigate Trump’s lawless actions in Portland—they are also working to defund this action in Congress,’ she said.

‘I know how challenging this is for Portlanders. I am committed to doing everything in my power to end this federal occupation and move forward with our community’s reckoning with racial injustice and our efforts to transform our approach to policing and public safety,’ Eudaly added. 

Mayor Ted Wheeler and Commissioner Jo Ann Hardesty have called for a ‘cease-fire’ in the protests. 

The American Civil Liberties Union in Oregon filed a motion alleging that the militarized U.S. agents are attacking journalists and legal observers with riot-control munitions, despite a federal court ordering them to stop this week.

Last week, the U.S. District Court in Portland – located in the same federal court building that’s been the focus of protests – temporarily blocked federal officers from targeting journalists and legal observers at the protests.

The ACLU asked the court to sanction and hold in contempt federal agents for violating the temporary restraining order. 

'As of yesterday, the federal government owes us $192,000 and counting. We intend to collect,' Portland City Commissioner  Chloe Eudaly tweeted Tuesday

‘As of yesterday, the federal government owes us $192,000 and counting. We intend to collect,’ Portland City Commissioner  Chloe Eudaly tweeted Tuesday

Several moms join together to block a Department of Homeland Security SUV from pursuing street protesters as they clash with federal officers on Tuesday

Several moms join together to block a Department of Homeland Security SUV from pursuing street protesters as they clash with federal officers on Tuesday 

A fire is set during a demonstration in downtown Portland Tuesday night

A fire is set during a demonstration in downtown Portland Tuesday night  

Federal law enforcement officers stand guard during a protest against racial inequality and police violence in Portland

Federal law enforcement officers stand guard during a protest against racial inequality and police violence in Portland 

Meanwhile, business owner Stacey Gibson (right), who owns five fast-food restaurants in Portland has said that nightly protests have been hijacked by people 'taking advantage of an opportunity' and who are not a part of the Black Lives Matter movement

Meanwhile, business owner Stacey Gibson (right), who owns five fast-food restaurants in Portland has said that nightly protests have been hijacked by people ‘taking advantage of an opportunity’ and who are not a part of the Black Lives Matter movement

It also asked the court to order Acting Homeland Security Secretary Chad Wolf and Acting Deputy Secretary Ken Cuccinelli to personally appear and show why they should not be sanctioned for contempt.

The organization cited numerous instances in which agents have violated the order by firing impact munitions and using pepper spray against people clearly marked as journalists or legal observers. 

One journalist, Jonathan Levinson of Oregon Public Broadcasting, said in a statement to the court that while he was trying to take a photograph Friday, he saw a federal agent raise his weapon, aim it at him and fire several rounds.

‘My camera and lens were splattered with paint,’ Levinson said. ‘Based on my position and the position of people around me, there is almost no chance the agent was aiming at anyone other than me.’ 

Trump had also sent troops to Seattle on ‘standby’ last week to protect federal buildings amid civil unrest.

Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan said Tuesday that she had received confirmation that agents had left her city. 

Meanwhile, businesses in the downtown area are fighting to survive. 

Stacey Gibson, who owns five fast-food restaurants in Portland has said that nightly protests have been hijacked by people ‘taking advantage of an opportunity’ and who are not a part of the Black Lives Matter movement.

Gibson said it has been ‘terrifying’ trying to keep her businesses open. 

She told Fox News @ Night that she believes a bunch of opportunists are taking advantage of the protests and that the message of the Black Lives Matter movement ‘is getting lost’.

‘It’s certainly not the Black Lives movement that is causing all this damage on the federal buildings and everything else,’ Gibson said. 

‘It’s just people taking advantage of an opportunity. And it’s hurting a lot of people – I mean, not just the businesses but the residents and everybody that’s trying to be down here. I mean, it’s just destroyed Portland, in my opinion.

‘It’s terrifying as a business owner. I’m just not really sure what to expect and this is just unprecedented situations.’