George Floyd’s roommate says he would NEVER use fake cash, take drugs and barely drank alcohol


The $20 bill that instigated the arrest of George Floyd and its tragic consequences may not have been a fake – and if it was, Floyd would have never intentionally used counterfeit cash, his roommate claims.  

Floyd’s roommate of four years, Alvin Manago, 55, exclusively told DailyMail.com that Floyd was a stand-up guy and if he did use a counterfiet bill at the store before his death, it was ‘unintentional’.  

‘I’ve never known Floyd to use any counterfeit money. If he tried to pass along a counterfeit $20 bill it was unintentional,’ Manago said. ‘He probably didn’t know the money was fake. 

‘I’m just not sure why the store employees didn’t just tell him it was a fake $20. They all knew him them. He was a regular customer.’

Manago met George Floyd, 46, when they worked together at the Conga Bistro Bar and Grill. Floyd worked security and Manago worked as a bar back. Manago says they had been roommates for almost four years and considers him one of his best friends.

Floyd died last Monday after being killed during an arrest in Minneapolis, Minnesota, for allegedly trying to use a counterfeit $20 at a local market.  

George Floyd's roommate of four years Alvin Manago, 55, tells DailyMail.com that Floyd would never use counterfeit money intentionally

George Floyd’s (right)  roommate of four years Alvin Manago, 55, (left) tells DailyMail.com that Floyd would never use counterfeit money intentionally 

'I'm just not sure why the store employees didn't just tell him it was a fake $20. They all knew him them. He was a regular customer,' Manago said. Pictured is the Cup Foods store where Floyd allegedly tried to use the fake $20 bill

‘I’m just not sure why the store employees didn’t just tell him it was a fake $20. They all knew him them. He was a regular customer,’ Manago said. Pictured is the Cup Foods store where Floyd allegedly tried to use the fake $20 bill 

Floyd lived with housemate Alvin Manago at this apartment in Minneapolis, Minneapolis. The property is owned by Floyds former employer Jovanni Thunstrom

Floyd lived with housemate Alvin Manago at this apartment in Minneapolis, Minneapolis. The property is owned by Floyds former employer Jovanni Thunstrom

Cell phone video captured former Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin kneeling on Floyd’s neck for several minutes after he was handcuffed. Floyd died hours later at a local hospital.  

Former police officer Derek Chauvin was arrested last week on a third degree murder and manslaughter charges, but Manago believes this is just the beginning.

‘I want to see all of the officers arrested,’ he said. ‘The other officers protected the situation even after George was unconscious.’

Manago also has issues with the probable cause statement. 

Manago said he wasn’t aware of any pre-existing medical conditions listed in the probable cause statement for Floyd.

The arrest warrant states that ‘the autopsy revealed no physical findings that support a diagnosis of traumatic asphyxia or strangulation. Mr. Floyd had underlying health conditions including coronary artery disease and hypertensive heart disease. The combined effects of Mr. Floyd being restrained by the police, his underlying health conditions and any potential intoxicants in his system likely contributed to his death.’

‘I’ve never known Floyd to take any prescription medication apart from some pain pills on one occasion after he was recently released from the hospital. He never mentioned to me about having any medical problems or high blood pressure,’ said Manago.

Manago also said that Floyd barely drank alcohol.

‘He maybe had a shot or a beer. I’ve never seen him drunk or use drugs,’ he added. 

Choking up, Manago said Floyd was a good guy who had turned his life around. ‘He didn’t deserve to die this way. Floyd needs justice,’ he said. 

Manago said he never knew Floyd to use counterfeit money and the transaction must have been unintentional

Manago said he never knew Floyd to use counterfeit money and the transaction must have been unintentional

George Floyd, a 46-year-old black man, died on Memorial Day as he was arrested by four police officers over allegedly trying to buy cigarettes with a counterfeit $20 bill

He was seen in a video pleading that he couldn't breathe as white officer Derek Chauvin pressed his knee against his neck

Floyd died on Memorial Day as he was arrested by four police officers over allegedly trying to buy cigarettes with a counterfeit $20 bill. He was seen in a video pleading that he couldn’t breathe as white officer Derek Chauvin pressed his knee against his neck

‘Floyd would be against the violence and looting. He wouldn’t want people looting and burning buildings in his name. He didn’t promote violence,’ said Manago.

‘He’d be disgusted with what’s going on in the country. I don’t want the looting and rioting attached to his name, he wouldn’t want that.

‘Floyd needs justice. Floyd didn’t deserve to die that way he did.’

Manago also says that Floyd had been exposed to someone who lived with them who had tested positive two months ago for COVID-19. However, he does not believe it had anything to do with his death. 

‘He went to the hospital a few months ago, he was sluggish, throwing up and had diarrhea and complaining of stomach pain. He spent a few days in the hospital and then came back home,’ said Manago.

At about the same time, Manago’s fiancée tested positive for COVID-19. Manago says that he was also tested but the results came back inconclusive. He wasn’t sure if Floyd was ever tested for the virus but said he displayed all of the symptoms of having it.

Derek Chauvin, 44, was arrested Friday on charges of third-degree murder and manslaughter in the death of George Floyd, which has sparked violent protests

Derek Chauvin, 44, was arrested Friday on charges of third-degree murder and manslaughter in the death of George Floyd, which has sparked violent protests

Manago said, ‘The health care workers told me that there was no reason to come back for another test since we lived with someone who tested positive for the coronavirus and have been exposed to it. So we should just treat it like we have it and self-quarantine.’ 

After Floyd was discharged from the hospital he came home and rested. Manago said he never found out exactly why Floyd spent time in the hospital, but is convinced they both had coronavirus.

As DailyMail.com exclusively revealed, Chauvin has been moved to one of the nation’s most secure prison to ‘ensure he’s not murdered behind bars’ according to law enforcement sources.

Chauvin was arrested last Friday and housed in the Ramsey County Jail in nearby St. Paul, Minnesota. On Sunday afternoon, he was transferred to the Hennepin County Jail in Minneapolis, then hours later transferred yet again to a correctional facility in Oak Heights, Minnesota –  the state’s only Level 5 maximum security prison.

Commissioner of Corrections Paul Schnell said Chauvin was moved to prison because of concerns about coronavirus and the huge influx of people being booked into Twin Cities jails on public order offenses.

‘First and foremost, we have a COVID situation. Second of all, a large number of people could be booked into Hennepin County Jail,’ Schnell said.

It’s highly unusual to lock defendants up in prison before they have been convicted, however officials did something similar in the case of disgraced Minneapolis officer Mohamed Noor who shot dead a woman in 2017 while responding to her 911 call.

‘The move to DOC custody was made out of an abundance of caution to ensure he is safely held and after concern about space in the jail due to large numbers of arrests related to the unrest over the last few nights,’ a spokesman said.

‘The DOC also took custody of former officer Mohamed Noor during the time he was in custody before being officially committed to our custody at sentencing, after a similar request in that case.

‘The processing of his [Chauvin’s] transfer to OPH, including the taking of photos, in being completed this morning. He will appear, with official photos, on the public database of inmates after that process is completed.

‘He is being held in administrative segregation outside the general population of the facility.’

Derek Chauvin has been moved to Oak Park Heights Prison in Minnesota (pictured), a maximum security prison

Derek Chauvin has been moved to Oak Park Heights Prison in Minnesota (pictured), a maximum security prison 

Administrative segregation, a form of solitary confinement known as ‘in the hole’, is employed when inmates are deemed to be at grave risk of being attacked by other prisoners or because they pose a significant danger to others.

According to recent data released by the Minnesota Department of Corrections, the Oak Park Heights Prison currently houses 297 murderers, 69 sexual predators and eight kidnappers.

Some 46 percent of the prison population is black.

The 160-acre, rural prison is carved into the side of a hill and has been featured on the National Geographic show America’s Hardest Prisons.

Cells are 7 by 10 feet with cement slab bed and toilets and sink made of steel so they can’t be broken off to use as weapons.

The reinforced windows are said to be so secure that it would take 12,000 hacksaw blades to cut though the steel bars.

Chauvin will be held at the prison until next Monday, June 8th where he is scheduled to appear in a downtown Minneapolis courtroom for the first time since his arrest.

Anti-viral coating that kills coronavirus in SECONDS ‘could be on the market in weeks’


Self-cleaning and anti-viral doorknobs that are able to kill the coronavirus in seconds could be a reality in the coming weeks. 

Dr Felicity de Cogan of the University of Birmingham revealed today that engineers are creating surfaces capable of rapidly neutralising the SARS-CoV-2 virus. 

Speaking at an online press conference, Dr de Cogan said the materials could be ready for the market in the coming weeks.

However, she admitted it is more realistic they would be finished by Christmas.  

Scroll down for video  

 Dr de Cogan said copper and silver have already shown promise when it comes to this. She says studies have found they are 99 per cent effective after 2-6 hours. Some countries have started coating surfaces regularly used by lots of people in the metal (stock)

Dr de Cogan, founder of NitroPep infection-resistant coatings and an enterprise fellow at the Royal Academy of Engineering, said there is already some progress being made in this field.  

‘Surfaces are really important in the fight against COVID-19 and if we can clean surfaces we can stop the spread of disease,’ she said. 

‘People can either clean surfaces manually, or we can create more self-cleaning materials. 

‘A self-cleaning surface, I believe, is a much stronger prospect as they need no maintenance, work continuously and don’t require people to change their behaviour.

‘We cant really clean surfaces quick enough ourselves and the existing self-cleaning surfaces can only destroy the virus after several hours, but think of how many people touch a train handrail in a matter of minutes.  

‘Self cleaning surfaces are designed to release, or permanently be, anti-microbial. So it continuously kills pathogens.’

Copper has inherent antimicrobial properties — a British company called Copper Clothing is selling a 'Washable and Reusable Copper Infused KN99 Face Mask' for £29.99 — but the time-frame that it does this in is insufficient at preventing the spread of coronavirus

Copper has inherent antimicrobial properties — a British company called Copper Clothing is selling a ‘Washable and Reusable Copper Infused KN99 Face Mask’ for £29.99 — but the time-frame that it does this in is insufficient at preventing the spread of coronavirus 

Coronavirus survives on surgical masks for up to SEVEN days 

SARS-CoV-2, the virus causing the COVID-19 pandemic ravaging the world, can survive on surgical face masks for up to seven days, scientists claim. 

The novel coronavirus is being rapidly studied to understand how long it remains contagious on various surfaces and under certain conditions. 

A piece of research from Hong Kong found ‘a significant level of infectious virus could still be detected on the outer layer of a surgical mask’ after seven days. 

But researchers from the US report no viable SARS-CoV-2 was measured after 24 hours on cardboard, indicating using the postal service is relatively risk-free. 

Printing paper — including newspapers — kills the virus in three hours and experts have today announced the likelihood of infection from goods that have been transported is low.  

A piece of research published online at medRxiv, a pre-print site where research is posted before it has been scrutinised before other academics in a process known as peer-review. 

But the initial findings from Alex Chin and colleagues at the University of Hong Kong found the virus was highly stable for an extended period at 4°C. 

At room temperature it can survive at high levels for seven days if untreated, but will be eradicated after 14 days. 

Surface transmission is one of three main ways that scientists think the coronavirus can spread – along with direct human-to-human transmission via large droplets produced when coughing or sneezing and smaller airborne droplets.

Dr de Cogan said copper and silver have already shown promise when it comes to  killing the virus, meaning that people who touch these surfaces are unlikely to pick it up on their hands.

She says studies have found that even non-engineered metal is 99 per cent effective at killing the virus after 2-6 hours. 

William Keevil, a senior microbiologist at the University of Southampton, has previously called for door handles, shopping trolleys, handrails on public transport, and even gym equipment to be coated in the metals.

Professor Keevil told The Times recently that buses in Poland had already been fitted with copper-plated handrails, while airports in Chile and Brazil immigration kiosks were coated in the metal.

He said gyms in America — which are teeming with bacteria and other infectious germs — had even covered barbells and other equipment with copper.

It is well known that copper has inherent antimicrobial properties but Dr de Cogan says the time-frame that it does this in is insufficient at preventing the spread of coronavirus in the community. 

A British company called Copper Clothing, which is selling a ‘Washable and Reusable Copper Infused KN99 Face Mask’ for £29.99, claims it has the technology to potentially destroy the virus on a surface almost instantly. 

Rory Donnelly, head of research and development at Copper Clothing, told MailOnline the firm has engineered copper to destroy SARS-CoV-2. 

In clinical tests run by the company, their unique form of copper was found to be 99.8 per cent effective in under one minute and 99.99 per cent effective in under 10 minutes.

The fabric is currently incorporated into fabrics, such as cotton, and can be used to make face masks as well as gloves, bed-sheets and even a smartphone impervious to microbial infection. 

Mr Donnelly told MailOnline: ‘Copper in our material is so close together that ions can easily transmit electrical signals. In engineered copper fabrics this can happen in under a minute. 

‘If a microbe lands on that, the copper goes into “schizophrenic mode” and sends electrical signals to each other which is like a human walking into an electric fence.

‘It destroys the envelope surrounding the virus and this instantly kills it.’  

Previous research found ‘a significant level of infectious virus could still be detected on the outer layer of a surgical mask’ after seven days. 

While researchers from the US report no viable SARS-CoV-2 was measured after 24 hours on cardboard.

Printing paper — including newspapers — kills the virus in three hours while cloth and steel can harbour the virus for up to two and seven days, respectively. 

Dr de Cogan says it is essential a surface is created which can ‘kill the virus in seconds to minutes’.

Speaking today she said she is confident a product capable of this will be on the market by Christmas, if not much earlier. 

TOWIE’s Amber Turner teases her taut waist as she lounges around in underwear and a baggy sweater


TOWIE’s Amber Turner teases her taut waist as she lounges around in underwear and a baggy sweater… before changing into fake Louis Vuitton silk pyjamas

TOWIE’s Amber Turner took to Instagram on Wednesday to show off her latest lockdown look – an oversized baggy sweater and a pair of Calvin Klein knickers.

And Amber, 26, made sure she showed off her taut tummy in the lazy look, as she lifted her jumper to show off her tanned, toned waist.

She posed for the snap on the floor, her blonde locks bouncing loosely around her perfectly preened features.

Woman in white: TOWIE’s Amber Turner took to Instagram on Wednesday to show off her latest lockdown look – an oversized baggy sweater and a pair of Calvin Klein knickers

She was then seen on her Stories on the floor once more – this time in a pair of fake Louis Vuitton silk pyjamas.

Her bofriend Dan Edgar, 30, could be heard off-camera mocking her, impersonating her as she showed off the nightware, admitting that the PJs were not the real deal.

The couple are isolating in Essex and appear to be stronger than ever, as they celebrated their anniversary with a sunny bike ride in London on Sunday.

Amber documented their special day on her Instagram page, as she shared a sweet snap of the couple enjoying sushi together in Regents park.

Lazing about: She was then seen on her Stories on the floor once more - this time in a pair of fake Louis Vuitton silk pyjamas

Lazing about: She was then seen on her Stories on the floor once more – this time in a pair of fake Louis Vuitton silk pyjamas

She captioned the image: ‘Such a perfect day celebrating our anniversary! Roka takeaway in Regents Park & exploring London on the bikes! Love you forever @danedgar.’

The beauty also shared a snap of herself holding a bouquet of stunning pink and red roses, which were presumably a gift from her other half. 

Last month the blonde treated her boyfriend to an extravagant 30th birthday celebration at their Chigwell flat.

Out and about: The couple are isolating in Essex and appear to be stronger than ever, as they celebrated their anniversary with a sunny bike ride in London on Sunday

Out and about: The couple are isolating in Essex and appear to be stronger than ever, as they celebrated their anniversary with a sunny bike ride in London on Sunday

Perfect: Amber documented their special day on her Instagram page, as she shared a sweet snap of the couple enjoying sushi together in Regents park

Perfect: Amber documented their special day on her Instagram page, as she shared a sweet snap of the couple enjoying sushi together in Regents park

Special: The beauty also shared a snap of herself holding a bouquet of stunning pink and red roses, which were presumably a gift from her other half

Special: The beauty also shared a snap of herself holding a bouquet of stunning pink and red roses, which were presumably a gift from her other half

Their three-year relationship has seen Amber break down in tears and split with her partner multiple times.

The fashion blogger previously spoke about the pressures of having her relationship cast in the spotlight, admitting ‘everyone is waiting for Dan to mess up’ in a candid interview with MailOnline.  

She explained: ‘We’re completely fine. All couples have their rows. Obviously we have been through so much, people judge it and they’re like “break-up with him”. They’re waiting for Dan to mess up.

Wow! Amber has shared a series of stunning bikini snaps of late

Wow! Amber has shared a series of stunning bikini snaps of late

‘When couples get back together in the normal world nobody knows about the arguments they have behind closed doors. 

Amber, who has been sharing a series of stunning bikini snaps of late, added: ‘But because it’s on TV everyone judges you way more.’

The pair have endured a tumultuous romance, with Dan pursuing Clelia Theodorou and Chloe Sims during brief breaks in their relationship. 

Happy couple: Earlier this month, the blonde treated her boyfriend Dan Edgar to an extravagant 30th birthday celebration at their Chigwell flat

Happy couple: Earlier this month, the blonde treated her boyfriend Dan Edgar to an extravagant 30th birthday celebration at their Chigwell flat

Head of UK’s Covid-19 test and trace scheme Baroness Dido Harding faces grilling by MPs


The chief of the NHS’s coronavirus test and trace scheme came under fire from MPs today for refusing to give any data about how the system is working. 

Dido Harding, the chair of NHS Improvement, was slammed by former Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt when she couldn’t say how many Covid-19 tests are being completed within 24 hours.

Speaking to Parliament’s Health and Social Care Committee today, Baroness Harding faced demands for data about how well test and trace has worked so far.

Mr Hunt, chair of the committee, asked a series of questions about how quickly testing and tracing was being done and the level of compliance from the public.

But Baroness Harding refused to give numbers to the MPs and said none of the data had been ‘validated’.

Mr Hunt said he was ‘disappointed’ because he had given advance notice of the questions she would be asked.

When Baroness Harding could not say the overall proportion of coronavirus swab tests that are completed within 24 hours, Mr Hunt cut in: ‘You must know that; that just can’t be right. 

‘You’re telling me you don’t actually know how many tests come back within 24 hours and you’re in charge of NHS test and trace?’

Baroness Dido Harding appeared in front of MPs on the Health and Social Care Select Committee today to answer questions about Britain’s test and trace scheme

Baroness Harding replied: ‘I have not had the data validated.’

She was cut off again by Mr Hunt who said: ‘So you’ve got data but it’s not been validated?’

The test and trace chief said: ‘I have not got the data validated by the authority who has expressed concern over previous testing data not having been validated.’

The former health secretary and MP for South West Surrey asked Baroness Harding to write to the committee within a week confirming the figures. 

Earlier in the meeting Baroness Harding had refused to reveal what proportion of people who tested positive were contacted by tracers within 24 hours, what proportion of them were successfully contacted, what proportion were willing to share details about their close contacts, and what proportion of the contacts were willing to self-isolate when they were asked to do so.

Baroness Harding said a ‘weekly dashboard’ compiling national and local data would be published publicly online, potentially as soon as next week. 

Mr Hunt said: ‘I have to say I am quite disappointed with that because we did give you notice of these questions.

‘I would really like to probe and get as much of a flavour as I can because I think, this is a House of Commons select committee, and I think we were told it was going to be a world-beating system when it was launched and I don’t think it’s unreasonable for us to ask quite simple questions like what proportion of new Covid cases have been contacted within 24 hours.

‘Could you give us a flavour? And are you getting more than 80 per cent of them? Because we’ve been hearing that lots of contact tracers have been sitting idle.’ 

Who is Dido Harding? Baroness Harding of Winscombe was raised on a farm in Somerset, is former CEO of TalkTalk, an ex-jockey and married to Tory MP for Weston-super-Mare

The former chief executive of TalkTalk, who was at the helm of the company when it was hit by an £80 million cyber attack in 2015, is leading the UK’s test and trace scheme to tackle the coronavirus. 

Baroness Dido Harding of Winscombe, 53, was raised on a Somerset pig farm and is the granddaughter of Field Marshall Lord Harding, the commander of the Desert Rats who became the most senior soldier in the British army. 

A former jockey, she studied Policy, Politics and Economics at Oxford University, alongside David Cameron, and is the wife of John Penrose, the Conservative MP for Weston-super-Mare.

Upon graduating, she held a slew of roles at Thomas Cook, Woolworths, Tesco and Sainsbury’s. 

Baroness Harding was appointed CEO of TalkTalk in 2010, serving in the role for seven years, during which the company was the victim of a cyber attack that saw the personal and banking details of 157,000 customers accessed by hackers. 

She was subjected to repeated blackmail attempts after the hack, with demands for Bitcoins in exchange for stolen data, which included customers’ names, email addresses, mobile numbers, home addresses and dates of birth. 

Former TalkTalk CEO Baroness Dido Harding will lead the UK's test and trace scheme to tackle the coronavirus, set to launch tomorrow

Former TalkTalk CEO Baroness Dido Harding will lead the UK’s test and trace scheme to tackle the coronavirus, set to launch tomorrow

Baroness Harding is a former jockey, though she quit racing after hitting 40 and promising her husband she’d stop

In the aftermath, TalkTalk was fined a record £400,000 for security failings which allowed the data to be accessed ‘with ease’ in one of the biggest data breaches in history. 

TalkTalk is thought to have lost £60million from the fallout with an estimated 100,000 angry customers leaving, mainly to BT, while 2015 profits halved to £14million and shares lost nearly two-thirds of their value.

Baroness Harding faced repeated calls to step down over the breach, but stayed on until 2017, when she resigned to focus on her ‘public service activities’. 

Later that year, she was appointed chair of NHS Improvement, responsible for overseeing all NHS hospitals. 

A powerful figure,  she refuses to believe her gender has ever held her back, nor will she endorse female quotas on company boards, which she sees as political meddling. 

She also thinks that workers have too much maternity leave, despite admitting being the boss has allowed her to successfully juggle her own career with spending time with the two daughters she has with her husband. 

She studied Policy, Politics and Economics at Oxford University, alongside David Cameron, and is married to John Penrose, Conservative MP for Weston-super-Mare

She studied Policy, Politics and Economics at Oxford University, alongside David Cameron, and is married to John Penrose, Conservative MP for Weston-super-Mare

She said in a 2015 interview: ‘I have an enormously privileged position.

‘I make a lot of money – a matter of public record – I have a huge amount of help, and I’m more in control of the day and what I do than someone working shifts on the checkout, or running the produce department in a supermarket.’

Baroness Harding has also packed in a career as a jockey, which saw her appear at Cheltenham, Ascot and even the towering Grand National jumps at Aintree.

One particularly nasty crash over the sticks at Larkhill left her strapped to a spinal board – though she still managed to catch a flight to a conference in Thailand the next day.

As TalkTalk CEO, she was presented with the Daily Mail wooden spoon award for 'Worst Customer Service'

As TalkTalk CEO, she was presented with the Daily Mail wooden spoon award for ‘Worst Customer Service’

But, aged 24, she made a rash promise to her husband – she would give it all up at 40.

When the date came Penrose, who had not forgotten, made it clear breaching the bargain was a deal-breaker for the marriage.

Harding obliged, though does still race without jumps.

‘I miss the racing hugely,’ she previously admitted. ‘If you told me I could go off and do it tomorrow afternoon I would. For me that’s always been my way of shutting everything off and relaxing.’

Now, she is the leader of the government’s coronavirus tracing programme.

The NHS Test and Trace system for England will see anyone who develops symptoms told to self-isolate and get tested, with the close contacts of those who are found to be positive for the disease then told to quarantine for 14 days even if they test negative and are not sick.

The system is being launched without its NHS contact tracing app centrepiece prompting concerns that without the new technology the Government could struggle to tackle the spread of the disease.  

Experts immediately said the complexity of the programme meant there could be ‘several points of failure’ while the Government’s political opponents said ministers should never have largely ditched contact tracing in the first place. 

Mr Hancock said that adhering to self-isolation would be ‘voluntary at first’ but that he could ‘quickly make it mandatory if that is what it takes’.

He told the daily Downing Street press conference: ‘If you are contacted by NHS Test and Trace instructing you to isolate, you must. It is your civic duty, so you avoid unknowingly spreading the virus and you help to break the chain of transmission.’    

The launch of the programme was announced by Boris Johnson during an appearance in front of the Liaison Committee this afternoon as he admitted the UK’s testing capability was underpowered at the start of the outbreak because the ‘brutal reality’ was Britain did not ‘learn the lessons’ of previous pandemics.   

Julianne Hough is a ‘deeply different person now’


Julianne Hough is not the same person she was when she wed Brooks Laich nearly three years ago after first falling for the athlete in late 2013.

A source has told People the change is what led to the couple’s May split.

‘She is a deeply different person than she was when they got married, and she is proud of those differences and changes she’s made and she doesn’t want to go back,’ said an insider close to the Dancing With The Stars judge. ‘He is the man he is, and he shouldn’t change a thing.’

New vibe: Julianne Hough is not the same person she was when she wed Brooks Laich nearly three years ago after first falling for the athlete in late 2013, a source has told People; here she is seen at home in May

No longer a fit: 'She is a deeply different person than she was when they got married, and she is proud of those differences and changes she's made and she doesn't want to go back,' said an insider close to the Dancing With The Stars judge. Seen in February

No longer a fit: ‘She is a deeply different person than she was when they got married, and she is proud of those differences and changes she’s made and she doesn’t want to go back,’ said an insider close to the Dancing With The Stars judge. Seen in February

Brooks wanted to be there for Hough, but he just could not figure out what would bring her joy.

‘Brooks was determined to make it work, but he was constantly questioning what changes he needed to make for Julianne to be happy,’ said the insider.

‘He was fighting with this for months and it was very hard for him to let go of his marriage.’

When they decided to spend lockdown in different states – she is in LA while he is in Idaho – they had time to think the marriage over.

Hard to say bye: 'Brooks was determined to make it work, but he was constantly questioning what changes he needed to make for Julianne to be happy,' said the insider. 'He was fighting with this for months and it was very hard for him to let go of his marriage.' Seen in 2019

 Hard to say bye: ‘Brooks was determined to make it work, but he was constantly questioning what changes he needed to make for Julianne to be happy,’ said the insider. ‘He was fighting with this for months and it was very hard for him to let go of his marriage.’ Seen in 2019

‘It really took the lockdown and them being separated for two months for him to realize that it is time to let go,’ said a pal of Brooks;.

‘He has been happy living by himself in nature.’

And now the two don’t want to push themselves any longer to make things better.

‘It took them a while to get here, but now they both understand that they shouldn’t spend the rest of their lives together — not as spouses,’ said a source close to the former pro dancer.

‘They are hoping to move forward as deeply loving friends forever who will always be supportive and encouraging of one another.’

She went in this bra for a thirsty selfie

And he went shirt free for his thirsty portrait

They did have THIS in common: Both stars like to share alluring images to Instagram

Another source told Entertainment Tonight: ‘It has taken Julianne and Brooks some time to find the right moment to announce their split.

‘They haven’t been happy together for a long time but needed to come to terms with the fact that their marriage was over.’

Seems like one of the problems was he loved the country and she loved the city.

‘Brooks loves his outdoor life in Idaho, wanted a more traditional marriage and to start a family. Julianne wanted a less traditional marriage, to focus on her career and loves her city life and Hollywood existence,’ said a source.

But they went in with the best hopes: ‘They truly had a loving, romantic relationship, a fairy-tale wedding and believed they would spend the rest of their lives together but within two years, their views of marriage differed tremendously,’ the source added.

She came to fame on Dancing With The Stars: With Carrie Ann Inaba in 2015

She came to fame on Dancing With The Stars: With Carrie Ann Inaba in 2015

And her fame grew: Seen with (l-r) Howie Mandel, Gabrielle Union, Simon Cowell and Terry Crews on America's Got talent

And her fame grew: Seen with (l-r) Howie Mandel, Gabrielle Union, Simon Cowell and Terry Crews on America’s Got talent

And now they feel it just makes sense to let go.

‘They have been happier apart than together and realized they had no choice but to go their separate ways. Despite truly loving each other, they just didn’t see eye to eye.’  

‘We have lovingly and carefully taken the time we have needed to arrive at our decision to separate,’ Julianne, 31, and Brooks, 36, told People together in May.

‘We share an abundance of love and respect for one another and will continue to lead with our hearts from that place.’

Dearly beloved: Julianne reportedly began dating Brooks near the end of 2013 and they married in July 2017 by the lakeside town of Coeur D'Alene, Idaho (pictured)

Dearly beloved: Julianne reportedly began dating Brooks near the end of 2013 and they married in July 2017 by the lakeside town of Coeur D’Alene, Idaho (pictured)

The duo noted in their statement: ‘We kindly request your compassion and respect for our privacy moving forward.’ 

Two days before the separation announcement, Brooks posted ‘THIRST TRAP!’ shirtless photos from Idaho and Julianne commented that they were ‘awesome.’ 

During an Instagram Live interview with Oprah Magazine last month Julianne said of being in lockdown without Brooks: ‘I don’t feel lonely, but I definitely feel alone.’

Earlier last month amid rumors of marriage trouble with Brooks, Julianne wrote on Insta Stories: ‘Never betray yourself to be loyal to others.’

Amid the lockdown, during an Instagram Live session for her dance-influenced Kinrgy workouts she spilled that she was ‘Releasing all this stagnant energy built up from what’s going on personally and in the world.’

Julianne, who has described herself as ‘not straight,’ was glimpsed in mid-April on a stroll with dashing 38-year-old English actor Ben Barnes who is an old pal of hers. 

Out and about: The couple are seen maintaining a united front while stepping out in Los Angeles together this February

Out and about: The couple are seen maintaining a united front while stepping out in Los Angeles together this February

Meanwhile that month on his How Men Think podcast Brooks gushed that he was having a ‘great’ time in Idaho with his ‘awesome’ husky Koda.

Calling himself an ‘introvert by nature’ he acknowledged: ‘I love having my dog – if it wasn’t for my dog, I’d probably be a little more antsy with the isolation.’

Brooks drew notice in January when he said on How Men Think that he wanted to ‘really explore learning about sexuality’ going forward.

However on a later episode of How Men Think he clarified that he was looking into ‘exploring my sexuality, and by that I don’t mean if I’m gay or straight.’

Brooks explained: ‘I mean like in my sexual relationship, what is my sexuality and what am I craving and what are my desires and what are my wife’s, and like, how can we have this language to feed each other in – and get everything we want and be sexually expressed to the nth degree and everything?’ 

He also said: ‘When I think of being married and being in my relationship, truthfully at my core, I don’t see any other life for me. Like that’s the life that I choose.’

Julianne reportedly began dating Brooks near the end of 2013 and they married in July 2017 by the lakeside town of Coeur D’Alene, Idaho.

Priti Patel says 14-day coronavirus quarantine on UK arrivals is ‘essential’


Priti Patel insisted 14-day quarantine for UK arrivals is ‘essential to save lives’ today but admitted it will hit businesses hard – and confirmed ‘travel corridors’ are being considered to low-infection countries.

The Home Secretary defied a huge Tory revolt to tell MPs the blanket rule will come into force from Monday, with the next review new due to happen until the end of the month.

With only very limited exceptions for lorry drivers and NHS workers, everyone coming to the country by plane, rail or sea will be ordered to give an address and self-isolate for two weeks, with spot checks from officials. 

While she was adamant the clampdown was ‘proportionate’ to ensure coronavirus did not spike again, Ms Patel did raise hopes by saying the government is looking at ‘international travel corridors’ to low infection countries in the future. 

But she was assailed by a slew of Conservatives, with former minister Theresa Villiers urging her to act to ‘save jobs in aviation and let families go on holidays in the sun’. 

Ex-trade secretary Liam Fox said the government’s policy contortions resembled ‘gymnastics’, and the focus should be on test and trace rather than ‘unnecessary economic isolation’. 

Ryanair branded the system ‘utterly ineffective’ saying because spot checks are carried out on the phone people could trick officials even if they were out playing golf or on the beach.  

Ms Patel said: ‘Currently, there should only be essential travel, but across Government and with the sector we continue to explore all options for future safe travel. Any international approaches will be bilateral and agreed with the other countries concerned,’ she said. 

‘We need to ensure that those countries are deemed to be safe. We are not alone in our fight against this disease, or in the measures we have taken to stop it.’ 

Boris Johnson and Transport Secretary Grant Shapps are among ministers who have been pushing the idea behind the scenes – with Portugal this morning becoming the latest holiday destination to suggest it wants a deal in place soon.

The review criteria for the quarantine include international infection rates, what controls other countries have in place and whether ‘antibody and other testing methodologies’ can help minimise the health risk. 

Despite the resistance from business and Conservative MPs, Ms Patel was boosted today by a poll suggesting the public overwhelmingly supports the restrictions. The YouGov research found 63 per cent in favour of applying the rule broadly, while 24 per cent said it should only cover countries with high infection rates. Just 4 per cent did not think there should be any quarantine.   

In other news today as the coronavirus crisis rages on:

  • Leaked figures showed the new track-and-trace system identified only half of contacts in its first three days;
  • Labour’s Keir Starmer has torn into Boris Johnson for ‘winging it’ by loosening lockdown, saying the PM had an ‘exit but not a strategy’;
  • The children’s commissioner for England has warned that some vulnerable children might never return to school after lockdown, and ‘immense’ damage is being done to their prospects;
  • Wales has announced that schools are going to start reopening from June 29, but only for around a third of pupils; 
  • There have now been more deaths related to Covid-19 in Scottish care homes than in hospitals north of the border, according to latest figures; 
  • A study suggested that most prospective students want the start of the academic year delayed in order to secure more face-to-face teaching at university;
  • Mr Johnson has insisted ‘black lives matter’ and condemned the ‘inexcusable’ death of George Floyd but refused to criticise Donald Trumps’ response to protests; 

Priti Patel (pictured in the Commons today) insisted 14-day quarantine for UK arrivals is needed to prevent more deaths

YouGov research found 63 per cent in favour of applying the rule broadly, while 24 per cent said it should only cover countries with high infection rates

YouGov research found 63 per cent in favour of applying the rule broadly, while 24 per cent said it should only cover countries with high infection rates

From Monday, people coming into the UK from abroad will have to quarantine for 14 days to stop the spread of coronavirus

From Monday, people coming into the UK from abroad will have to quarantine for 14 days to stop the spread of coronavirus

A police officer talking to beach-goers in Italy. The UK has more cases of coronavirus per million people than most of the 15 most popular holiday destinations for Britons - including Italy

A police officer talking to beach-goers in Italy. The UK has more cases of coronavirus per million people than most of the 15 most popular holiday destinations for Britons – including Italy

A couple hug each other at Misericordia beach in Malaga. Spain has a far lower level of coronavirus infection rate than the UK

A couple hug each other at Misericordia beach in Malaga. Spain has a far lower level of coronavirus infection rate than the UK

Can Britons head off to their favourite destinations on holiday this summer?

France 

How many British visitors each year? 8.5million 

Can you visit? No. Its borders are closed to all tourists until June 15 at the earliest. Any foreigner arriving, including Britons, must go into 14-day quarantine.  

Is there anything open? Thousands of Britons have second homes in France. Hotels, B&Bs, campsites and gites open for French citizens from June 3. Cafes and restaurants are also open – but in Paris only ones with outside space can serve customers.   

Italy 

How many British visitors each year? 4.3million 

Can you visit?  Yes. Its borders open from today and there is no mandatory quarantining at all.

Is there anything open? Hotels are slowly opening from today while all campsites are now up and running. Beaches are open with social distancing and bars and restaurants are serving.  

Spain 

How many British visitors each year? 15.6million

Can you visit? No. Spain will open its borders from July 1. There is no quarantine planned but Britain is currently not on its list of agreed visitors because its coronavirus infection and death rates ‘still have to improve’. 

Is there anything open? Yes, but still limited options. Beaches are reopening with strict capacity numbers. Many hotels, restaurants and bars remain closed but are slowly reopening to be ready for the end of the month. 

Portugal 

How many British visitors each year? 2.8million

Can you visit? No, but probably soon. Borders are open but not currently to Britain. Although the two Governments are expected to agree an ‘air bridge’ meaning citizens can travel between the two nations with no quarantine. 

Is there anything open? Yes. Most hotels, B&Bs and campsites are expected to be open in the next fortnight. Beaches are fully open from the weekend onwards.  Golf courses are opening too.

United States 

How many British visitors each year? 3.9million

Can you visit? No. President Trump banned all EU visitors in mid-March but has said he soon will ‘start to open up’ to Europeans soon. There are still commercial flights between the UK and US.

Is there anything open? New York lockdown is not expected to ease until next week at the earliest – but on the west coast beaches, restaurants and beauty spots are opening. Restrictions vary from state to state.

Greece 

How many British visitors each year? 2.4million

Can you visit? No. Tourists are banned until mid-June. Border guards will test people arriving from high risk destinations. Mandatory quarantine of seven days is required. And the Greek Government has already said it will not accept flights from 13 UK airports, excluding Heathrow. 

Is there anything open? Yes. Hotels, tavernas and bars are open but with restrictions on numbers. Beaches are free to use and ferries still run between islands.  

Australia 

How many British visitors each year? 493,000

Can you visit? No. Only Australian citizens can enter – and they must go into quarantine for two weeks. There are plans to run an air corridor with neighbouring New Zealand from the Autumn.

Is there anything open? Yes. Restaurants and bars can operate with a maximum of 50 people. Pubs are open to diners not drinkers. Some, but not all, beaches are open.  

New Zealand 

How many British visitors each year? 128,000

Can you visit? Only NZ citizens can jet in – and as in Australia they must quarantine for 14 days on arrival. They will probably reopen an air corridor with Australia and Pacific islands from September.  

Is there anything open? As cases plummet, social distancing could end as early as next week – but gatherings will not exceed 100 people. Most businesses, including hotels, are now open.

United Arab Emirates

How many British visitors each year? 1.4million

Can you visit? No. But tourists could be allowed back in from July 1. A 14-day quarantine is likely. 

Is there anything open? Yes. Hotels, beaches, shopping centres and parks opened in May but face masks are mandatory. 

South Africa 

How many British visitors each year? 440,000 visits a year 

Can you visit? No. The South African borders are closed to all visitors. Experts believe this will remain in place until February 2021 with South Africans not allowed to holiday in the country themselves until Christmas. 

Is there anything open? No. Wildlife and safari parks, beaches, beauty spots and restaurants are all shut. 

Portugal’s foreign minister Augusto Santos Silva revealed this morning that his country is in discussions with the UK about forming an air bridge so tourists can avoid being quarantined, telling the BBC that ‘quarantine is an enemy of tourism’. 

He added: ‘During these weeks our diplomats will work together in order to guarantee that British tourists coming to Portugal would not be subjected on their return to England to any kind of quarantine.’

Germany will lift a travel ban for European Union member states plus Britain, Iceland, Norway, Liechtenstein and Switzerland from 15 June as long as there are no entry bans or large-scale lockdowns in those countries, the foreign minister said.

But Foreign Minister Heiko Maas said Germans would be urged not to travel to the UK while 14-day quarantine is in place.

Ms Patel told the Commons that the government was ‘taking a proportionate and time-limited approach to protect the health of the British people’.

She said arrivals will be required to fill in a ‘contact locator form’, including details on where they will isolate and how they can be contacted.

She said: ‘The form must be completed in advance of travel to provide details of the journey and Border Force will be at the front line of enforcing this requirement.

‘Passengers require a receipt, either printed or on their phone, to prove they have completed the form.

‘Border Force will undertake spot checks at the border and may refuse entry to non-resident nationals who refuse to comply. They will have the power to impose a £100 fixed penalty notice to those who don’t comply.’

Ms Patel said the data collected will be used by Public Health England, which will undertake checks to ensure people understand and follow the rules, adding: ‘If Public Health England has reason to believe someone is not following the law as they should be, they will inform the police.’

A breach of self-isolation could result in a £1,000 fixed penalty notice in England, or potential prosecution, Ms Patel added.

Labour’s shadow home secretary Nick Thomas-Symonds called for the Government to be clear on the scientific advice surrounding its plans to introduce a quarantine for overseas arrivals. 

He said: ‘If these measures are necessary from June 8, why have they not been necessary in recent weeks or from when they were first announced by the Home Secretary herself on May 22? 

‘And can the Home Secretary give me her assurance these measures from Monday next week have been recommended and approved by SAGE?’ 

Senior Tory Dr Fox said: I’m afraid I simply cannot get my head around the public health mental gymnastics of this policy.

‘If such a barrier was required, why was it not introduced earlier in the outbreak.

‘And if it is a contingency measure against a second wave, why apply it to countries with a lower infection rate than we already have.

‘Surely the answer lies in the government’s test-and-trace system, rather than unnecessary economic isolation.’ 

The 14-day quarantine scheme will be reviewed on June 29 to see whether low case numbers in some destinations might allow the measures to be relaxed on a country-by-country basis. 

A Downing Street source said: ‘We will be guided by the science, but the PM does not want to be standing in the way of people’s holidays unnecessarily.’ 

Health minister Edward Argar said earlier that he hoped people would be able to go on holiday this year.

He told Today: ‘I’m not going to say a particular date on when that might happen because we will have to be guided by how the disease behaves, controlling any risk of a second wave and controlling the disease.

‘I hope that people will be able to go on holiday at some point this year, but I can’t make that promise and because I have to be cautious and go with the science and I don’t have that forward view yet of how a second wave or otherwise might behave.’

Heathrow chief John Holland Kaye warned there was a danger of the ‘health pandemic becoming an unemployment pandemic’. 

He said there had to be an ‘exit plan’ from the quarantine plan to avert huge redundancies. 

‘If we don’t get a plan from the Government in the next few days on how we are going to reopen the economy, those jobs are at risk,’ he said.

‘I am going to have to make that decision in the next few weeks about jobs in my own company.

‘We need to stop this health pandemic becoming an unemployment pandemic.’

In a glimmer of hope for airlines, it has emerged that commercial flights will resume at London City Airport by the end of June.

Domestic routes will be the first to restart, with international flights ‘depending on the proposed quarantine of passengers arriving into the UK’, according to a statement.

London City’s runway has been closed to commercial and private flights since March 25 due to travel restrictions and the collapse in demand.

Leading travel operators still fear they will have to lay off 60 per cent of their staff, however. 

And the London Chambers of Commerce warned today that the policy sends out the message that the UK is ‘closed for business’.

Chief executive Paul Scully said: ‘Domestically, the Government’s roadmap to restarting the economy is correctly centred on a risk-based approach. 

‘Yet this blanket aviation proposal doesn’t appear to be risk-based. 

‘If it was, it would recognise that arrivals from some countries with much lower transmission levels than the UK and low incidence of the disease would not increase our risk, provided they adopted our social distancing protocols on arrival. 

‘The proposal sends out the message that the UK is closed for business, at a time when we are beginning to restart our economy.’ 

The news came as it emerged that nearly every country popular with Britons as a summer holiday destination has a lower coronavirus infection rate than the UK. 

The UK currently has more cases of coronavirus per million people than most of the 15 most popular holiday destinations for Britons. 

Only the US and Portugal have a higher infection rate with places like France, Spain, Greece and Italy all drastically lower than Britain. 

Ryanair says phone checks mean people in quarantine can be off ‘playing golf’

Ryanair has described the UK’s quarantine as ‘utterly ineffective’, claiming people can be playing golf or lying on a beach when telephone checks are made.

The airline claimed quarantines can only work when passengers are ‘detained’ at their point of arrival.

It said in a statement that the UK plans to allow people to travel on public transport across the country, and there is ‘nothing to stop’ them shopping in a supermarket to collect groceries before their 14-day quarantine begins.

The airline went on: ‘Once they have arrived at their ‘quarantine address’, the UK Government will phone less than 1% of these visitors but only on their mobile phone, which can be answered from any golf course, beach, park or indeed supermarket across the UK, thereby rendering this quarantine utterly ineffective and useless.

‘For the UK to be imposing a 14-day quarantine on inbound visitors when it already has one of the worst Covid infection and death rates in Europe, is closing the door long after the horse has bolted.

‘Most visitors to the UK from Europe are arriving from countries with a lower R rate than the UK.’

The data is sure to fuel the anger of opponents of the quarantine, after some 124 chief executive and owners of businesses worth a combined £5billion said they expect to make up to 60 per cent of their staff redundant if the scheme goes ahead.

Details of the quarantine scheme, which is due to come into force on Monday June 8, were expected to be revealed to MPs yesterday. 

But Downing Street confirmed that Home Secretary Priti Patel is now expected to unveil them later today, fuelling suggestions that some sort of compromise could be on the cards. 

Health Secretary Matt Hancock said yesterday he was growing ‘more optimistic’ about the prospect of Britons taking holidays abroad this year.  

Ms Patel will face rebellious Conservative MPs in the Commons later, warning them that opposition to the quarantine plan risk alienating the public and throwing away the country’s progress in tackling coronavirus. 

The 14-day quarantine scheme will be reviewed on June 29 to see whether low case numbers in some destinations might allow the measures to be relaxed on a country-by-country basis.

Leading travel operators still fear they will have to lay off 60 per cent of their staff however.  

Mr Johnson has been told to drops the plans to force visitors and returning British nationals to self-isolate for 14 days to avoid a ‘catastrophic’ hammer blow to the tourism and hospitality industries. 

MPs have also branded the curbs ‘ridiculous’ and ‘pointless’ after it emerged people will be allowed to pop out for food, only a fifth face spot checks, and officials will not be allowed to enter their homes.     

Under that plan, agreements between Britain and countries with low infection rates would allow people from those nations to visit the UK without self-isolating. 

Asked about the government’s policy in the evening Downing Street press briefing, Mr Hancock hinted at friction within the cabinet: ‘This air bridge idea has been floated. 

‘I know there has been a lot of discussion about it and I know that some countries have been mentioned in the media but that is a piece of work that is being done by the Home office and the DfT and I’m not going to tread on the toes of my colleagues no matter how tempting it is.’

The Health Secretary also said that all measures taken by the government, including those related to travellers, were taken with people’s safety as the key consideration.  

The new quarantine rules will allow people subject to the 14-day restrictions to leave their place of isolation for a number of reasons, including shopping for food. 

Travellers will also be able to board public transport from the port or airport to where they will quarantine, although they will be encouraged to use private vehicles instead. 

But the rules will only be in place for an initial three weeks, with the first review on June 29. 

Campaigner George Morgan-Grenville, the chief executive of tour operator Red Savannah, said: ‘By pursuing its quarantine plans without due regard for the economic consequences, the Government is choosing to ignore the devastation it will cause to companies, to employment and to the lives of all those whose jobs will be lost.

Heathrow chief warns over an ‘unemployment pandemic’ 

Heathrow’s chief railed against the quarantine place today warning there is a danger of the ‘health pandemic becoming an unemployment pandemic’. 

John Holland Kaye said there had to be an ‘exit plan’ from the restrictions to avert huge redundancies. 

‘If we don’t get a plan from the Government in the next few days on how we are going to reopen the economy, those jobs are at risk,’ he said.

‘I am going to have to make that decision in the next few weeks about jobs in my own company.

‘We need to stop this health pandemic becoming an unemployment pandemic.’

In a glimmer of hope for airlines, it has emerged that commercial flights will resume at London City Airport by the end of June.

Domestic routes will be the first to restart, with international flights ‘depending on the proposed quarantine of passengers arriving into the UK’, according to a statement.

London City’s runway has been closed to commercial and private flights since March 25 due to travel restrictions and the collapse in demand.

 

‘The quarantine measures are a blunt weapon which will bring only economic disaster.’

Ministers are also facing a major Tory rebellion over the issue.  

Whitehall sources said the quarantine plan had been championed by the PM’s chief adviser Dominic Cummings. 

But Mr Johnson is said to have been taken aback by the scale of opposition from within his own party.

Meanwhile, former Tory leader Iain Duncan Smith said travellers should not face quarantine unless arriving from a country with a higher infection rate than the UK’s.

A Government spokesman said: ‘Our priority will always be to protect the public’s health and these new measures are being introduced to do exactly this. We have received clear science advice and the quarantine system is designed to keep the transmission rate down, stop new cases being brought in from abroad and help prevent a devastating second wave of coronavirus.

‘We are supporting businesses in the tourism sector through one of the most generous economic packages provided anywhere in the world and we will continue to look at options to increase international travel, when it is safe to do so, as we move forward.’ 

The rules are due to take effect on Monday, but a there are growing signs the measures will be scaled back again when they are reviewed in three weeks. 

The air bridges plan, championed by Transport Secretary Grant Shapps, could see restrictions eased on countries like Australia and Greece with low levels of coronavirus. 

It offers some hopes of summer holidays for Britons as the nation struggles to get back to normal after months of lockdown. 

Ministers are expected to use a five-point assessment to judge which countries could be prioritised for the agreements. 

The criteria could include the economic and cultural ties to the UK, the infection rate and the level of health screening at departure airports.  

A country’s R rate of infection is likely to be the key factor in whether an air bridge agreement is considered.   

Just 23 people used Gatwick Airport in an entire day last week - down from its pre-covid average of 45,000

Just 23 people used Gatwick Airport in an entire day last week – down from its pre-covid average of 45,000

The news comes as MPs urged the government to rethink the 14-day quarantine to avoid killing off the airline industry.    

How UK coronavirus cases compare to 15 popular holiday destinations for Britons  

Tourism bosses and MPs have discussed air bridges to popular tourist destinations and countries who send large numbers of tourist to the UK.

Here is how the UK’s coronavoirus cases compare to popular nations. The figures are the daily confirmed cases of coronavirus per million people for each country, as of June 1.

UK – 28.52

SPAIN – 4.30

FRANCE – 3.94

ITALY – 5.87

USA – 59.84

GREECE – 0.19

PORTUGAL – 29.13

NETHERLANDS – 10.80

TURKEY – 9.85

IRELAND – 12.35

GERMANY – 3.98

BELGIUM – 16.82

MEXICO – 24.45

MOROCCO – 0.73

AUSTRALIA – 0.39

NEW ZEALAND – 0

Tory MP Henry Smith, whose Crawley constituency covers Gatwick, said low passengers at the airport last week highlighted the scale of the problem.   

He said: ‘It’s well-intentioned but it hasn’t been thought through.

‘It sounds good, to stop people at the borders so we don’t get re-infections of Covid-19. But I don’t think it is going to be a benefit to public health and will prolong the economic damage.’

Travel industry experts say quarantine, will cost Britain’s tourism sector as much as £15billion if it is maintained throughout the summer.

Under the plans, people arriving in the UK from Britain, including citizens returning from abroad, will have to self-isolate for two weeks. 

There are exemptions for groups including lorry drivers, health workers and scientists. 

Spot checks will be carried out on addresses and fines of £1,000 could be imposed on people breaking the rules.

But according to the Guardian, only a fifth of arrivals will be subject to spot checks. 

People will be able to give more than one address where they will be self-isolating – and will also be allowed to go out to buy food – including for pets – or medicine.

‘To get caught, you will either have to be unlucky or stupid,’ one source said.  

Like the wider lockdown measures, the plans will be reviewed every three weeks.

Former transport minister Stephen Hammond asked what the point of the quarantine was when it could be dodged relatively easily.

The Tory MP told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme that air bridges would be a ‘sensible, targeted response’ between low-risk countries.

‘I think the idea of air bridges are the right way forward,’ he added.

‘I think, as we’ve seen across the world, people are taking measures out of the lockdown and this targeted approach would be a much more sensible way to behave.’

The air bridges idea was first floated by Mr Shapps last month, before being played down by No10 sources.

However, sources told the Telegraph that Mr Johnson is now ‘personally in favour’ of the plan. 

Priti Patel, the home secretary, is thought to remain sceptical. 

Travel companies are offering up to 65 per cent off summer holidays – but tourism experts are warning Britons the trips may not end up going ahead.

The bargain packages are being advertised on booking sites for as early as July in a bid to salvage the season.

It came as last night the holiday dreams of millions of Britons were given a boost after Portugal and Greece said they were ready to welcome back UK tourists within days.

Tui, Britain’s biggest tour operator, is cutting three nights all-inclusive at the TUI SUNEO Odessos in Bulgaria on July 10 from £543 per person to £296. And a seven-night trip to Gran Canaria on July 6 has been slashed from £606 to £394.

Travel Zoo is offering two nights in Paris in September for £79 – up to 64 per cent cheaper than usual.

And easyJet Holidays is selling a week-long stay at Anseli Hotel in Rhodes from July 8 for £195 with flights and transfers.

But experts have warned desperate Britons to hold off booking for now.

The Foreign Office still advises against all but essential travel and there will be a two-week quarantine for returning holidaymakers from June 8.

Rory Boland, editor of Which? Travel, said: ‘If consumers are keen to book something now they should go into it with their eyes open.

‘If the FCO advice is still in place when their holiday is due to take place, they will get a refund, but there’s a good chance they will be waiting a long time.

‘Holiday providers need to make it clear to their customers that these holidays may not take place.’

The UK quarantine will be reviewed every three weeks. TUI spokesman Liz Edwards said they hope it will be lifted on June 29 in time for summer trips.

She added: ‘We believe we will be having summer holidays this year, hopefully from July. We hope the quarantine will be lifted, but air bridges are certainly a possibility.

‘Bookings have been really picking up. Spain, Greece, Cyprus are likely to open up first. The Canaries and Balearics are keen to welcome back tourists.’

Airlines are also heavily discounting flights. A Heathrow to Cancun return with Air France in September, which usually sells for around £800, is being advertised for £312.

And return flights from Manchester to Reykjavik with easyJet in November are being sold for £41 (usually £150 plus), and Manchester to Dubrovnik with Jet2 from £30 one-way in late June (usually around £120).

Emma Coulthurst, from TravelSupermarket, said: ‘The 14-day quarantine measure makes holidays pretty impractical, although I have heard of some people willing to do it to get a holiday. There is a risk booking now as there is no guarantee the holiday will go ahead.’

Research by TUI revealed the most popular destinations for trips this year are Spain, Greece and Italy followed by Florida and the Caribbean.

AREAS WITH THE MOST AND LEAST COVID-19 DEATHS

According to ONS data for England and Wales up to May 22, these are the areas that had recorded the most and least deaths from the coronavirus: 

MOST DEATHS

  1. Birmingham (1,082) 
  2. Leeds (605)
  3. County Durham (567)
  4. Liverpool (529)
  5. Sheffield (498)
  6. Brent (465)
  7. Croydon (458)
  8. Barnet (442)
  9. Cheshire East (417)
  10. Bradford (416)

FEWEST DEATHS

  1. Isles of Scilly (0)
  2. City of London (5)  
  3. Ceredigion (7)
  4. Hastings (8)
  5. South Hams (12)
  6. Rutland (15)
  7. Mid Devon (15)
  8. West Devon (15)
  9. Norwich (17)
  10. Mendip (18)

And those hoping to go to Greece or Portugal this summer could still get the chance.

Officials in Lisbon believe Britain has coronavirus ‘under control’ and want quarantine-free travel between the two countries to restart from this Saturday.

Greece’s tourism minister Harry Theocharis told the Mail the epidemic was moving ‘in the right direction’ in the UK and restrictions could be dropped for Britons from June 15.

The interventions increased pressure on Downing Street to re-think its plan for a ‘blanket’ 14-day quarantine amid a growing backlash from MPs at being denied a vote on the measures.

Ms Patel will now introduce the regulations in Parliament to come into effect from next Monday.

But they will be brought as a statutory instrument, which does not automatically go to a vote. Tory MPs are expecting the government to give a strong signal on air bridges to head off an outright rebellion.

Under the plans, anyone entering the country by plane, train or boat will have to go into quarantine for two weeks.

This will apply to foreign tourists as well as Britons returning from abroad.

However, some people, including medical professionals and lorry drivers, will be exempt.

MPs among a cross-party group of at least 40 who are critical of the plans last night voiced their fury.

They want the Government to leave open the option of creating ‘air bridges’ – which would allow tourists between two countries to visit without needing to quarantine – to salvage as much of the summer holiday season as possible and help keep the hard-hit tourism industry afloat.

They say, instead of quarantine, arrivals to the UK could be subject to health checks or testing.

Industry chiefs say millions of Britons are desperate for a foreign getaway, but the blanket quarantine policy has all but cancelled summer holidays.

Former Cabinet minister David Davis said: ‘Parliament should be properly involved and quite plainly it is not. In this particular case, its very blanket policy could reasonably be amended in a number of ways. 

‘For example, our death rate is many, many times than that in Greece. So the idea of quarantining someone coming from Greece who would have a much lower risk of suffering from the disease than someone anywhere else in Britain is plainly not supported by any sort of science.

‘The idea of putting in air bridges might be a sensible amendment.’

Former environment secretary Theresa Villiers said: ‘I would very much prefer the quarantine rules be targeted on flights from Covid hotspots.

‘I appreciate why the Government is bringing in quarantine but I do think that applying it in a blanket way across the board is an over-reaction.’

Sir Graham Brady, chairman of the influential 1922 Committee of Tory backbenchers, said: ‘I hope the Government will move swiftly to introduce air bridges and also to introduce a testing regime at airports as quickly as possible.’

Downing Street last night insisted it still intended to push ahead with the policy.

It has stressed quarantine will be reviewed every three weeks and has left open the possibility of striking air bridge deals in future.

But the first review period would not be until June 29. 

It comes as a leading expert predicted today that Britain is on track to have zero Covid-19 deaths by July – as health chiefs announced 324 more coronavirus fatalities. 

Professor Carl Heneghan, an Oxford University epidemiologist, expects no ‘excess deaths’ when weekly data taking into account suspected and confirmed deaths is published next Tuesday.  

The week ending May 22 had the fewest coronavirus deaths of any seven-day period since Britain's lockdown began in March. The Office for National Statistics showed that 1,983 people died in England and Wales in the week ending May 22, down from 2,766 a week earlier

The week ending May 22 had the fewest coronavirus deaths of any seven-day period since Britain’s lockdown began in March. The Office for National Statistics showed that 1,983 people died in England and Wales in the week ending May 22, down from 2,766 a week earlier

The weekly death toll in England and Wales dropped to its lowest levels since the lockdown began, an Office for National Statistics (ONS) report said today. A total of 1,983 people in England and Wales died with Covid-19 in the week ending May 22, down almost 30 per cent in a week and the lowest figure for two months.  

Both England and Wales – which suffered 16,000 deaths during the darkest fortnight of the crisis in April – are now en route to the way they were before the unprecedented lockdown was imposed on March 23.  

But sobering statistics also show that there have now been nearly 50,000 people killed by Covid-19 across the UK this year, cementing Britain’s position as one of the worst-hit countries in the world. And other estimates looking at ‘excess deaths’ – deemed the most reliable measure to work out the true scale of an infectious disease outbreak – show 62,000 more fatalities were recorded during the pandemic than expected.

It comes as the UK Government this week starts to move the nation out of lockdown and back to work and school as the number of new deaths and cases continue to tumble. 

Department of Health figures today revealed the official death toll has jumped to 39,369 – an increase of 324 on yesterday. For comparison, 111 fatalities were registered yesterday, as well as 134 last Tuesday – a figure much lower than expected due to a recording lag on the bank holiday Monday.  

At this evening’s press Downing Street press conference, Health Secretary Matt Hancock said the trend for daily infections is ‘broadly down but there is still some way to go’, as the total number of positive tests neared 278,000. 

Mr Hancock said the number of new admissions for Covid-19 in England has fallen to the lowest since March 20, and demonstrates progress against the disease. Daily admissions are down seven per cent since last Tuesday.  

The Department of Health revealed 324 more people had died across all settings. 

Each nation’s health agency reported their own figures earlier today – including 12 in Scotland, seven in Wales and two in Northern Ireland. These figures do not always match with the DH count because of a difference in how they are recorded.

Today’s official Government figure, which brings the total closer to 40,000, is 68 per cent lower than the Tuesday a fortnight ago, when 545 deaths were recorded following a lag in reporting over the bank holiday. 

Processes for recording people’s deaths are known for slowing down and even stopping at the weekends and on bank holidays, meaning there is a dip every Monday, followed by surges on Tuesdays.   

The weekly report from ONS said there were 12,288 deaths registered in England and Wales in the week ending May 22, known as ‘Week 21’.

This was 2,285 less than the previous week – but still 2,348 more than usual for this time of year.

Professor Heneghan, director of the Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine, University of Oxford said he expects deaths to be back to normal by next week. 

Asked during a Science Media Centre briefing whether he expects deaths from Covid-19 to stop or plateau, Professor Heneghan said: ‘If the trends continue, the deaths look like they will be back to where they should be normally by next week.

‘There’s been a continued reduction in hospital deaths, care home outbreaks are coming down so the ‘all deaths’ by (week) 22 I’m expecting will be back to where we should be.’

Professor Heneghan said there may be no Covid-19 deaths by the end of June – which would follow Spain yesterday. Italy is still reporting between 50 and 100 deaths per day, and France around 30.

‘But it also depends on what happens next, within sporadic outbreaks,’ Professor Heneghan said.

He warned that there will be spikes in deaths with further outbreaks in care homes, and said information on how many people are catching the virus in hospital would ‘give us a really good understanding of the spreading of this disease’.

Professor Kevin McConway, emeritus professor of applied statistics at The Open University, said: ‘I certainly don’t want to be a prophet of gloom, but I would urge some caution about these positive trends. 

‘The new week’s data would not yet have been affected by the loosening of the lockdown. That began to happen in the previous week (ending 15 May), though most changes occurred much more recently.

‘If any of the changes turn out to have increased infections, that won’t show up in death statistics yet anyway, because obviously there is a time gap between infection and death. But we’ll see eventually.’ 

Priti Patel says 14-day coronavirus quarantine on UK arrivals is ‘essential’


Priti Patel insisted 14-day quarantine for UK arrivals is ‘essential to save lives’ today but admitted it will hit businesses hard – and confirmed ‘travel corridors’ are being considered to low-infection countries.

The Home Secretary defied a huge Tory revolt to tell MPs the blanket rule will come into force from Monday, with the next review new due to happen until the end of the month.

With only very limited exceptions for lorry drivers and NHS workers, everyone coming to the country by plane, rail or sea will be ordered to give an address and self-isolate for two weeks, with spot checks from officials. 

While she was adamant the clampdown was ‘proportionate’ to ensure coronavirus did not spike again, Ms Patel did raise hopes by saying the government is looking at ‘international travel corridors’ to low infection countries in the future. 

But she was assailed by a slew of Conservatives, with former minister Theresa Villiers urging her to act to ‘save jobs in aviation and let families go on holidays in the sun’.

Ex-trade secretary Liam Fox said the government’s policy contortions resembled ‘gymnastics’, and the focus should be on test and trace rather than ‘unnecessary economic isolation’.   

Ms Patel said: ‘Currently, there should only be essential travel, but across Government and with the sector we continue to explore all options for future safe travel. Any international approaches will be bilateral and agreed with the other countries concerned,’ she said. 

‘We need to ensure that those countries are deemed to be safe. We are not alone in our fight against this disease, or in the measures we have taken to stop it.’ 

Boris Johnson and Transport Secretary Grant Shapps are among ministers who have been pushing the idea behind the scenes – with Portugal this morning becoming the latest holiday destination to suggest it wants a deal in place soon.

The review criteria for the quarantine include international infection rates, what controls other countries have in place and whether ‘antibody and other testing methodologies’ can help minimise the health risk. 

Despite the resistance from business and Conservative MPs, Ms Patel was boosted today by a poll suggesting the public overwhelmingly supports the restrictions. The YouGov research found 63 per cent in favour of applying the rule broadly, while 24 per cent said it should only cover countries with high infection rates. Just 4 per cent did not think there should be any quarantine.   

In other news today as the coronavirus crisis rages on:

  • Leaked figures showed the new track-and-trace system identified only half of contacts in its first three days;
  • Labour’s Keir Starmer has torn into Boris Johnson for ‘winging it’ by loosening lockdown, saying the PM had an ‘exit but not a strategy’;
  • The children’s commissioner for England has warned that some vulnerable children might never return to school after lockdown, and ‘immense’ damage is being done to their prospects;
  • Wales has announced that schools are going to start reopening from June 29, but only for around a third of pupils; 
  • There have now been more deaths related to Covid-19 in Scottish care homes than in hospitals north of the border, according to latest figures; 
  • A study suggested that most prospective students want the start of the academic year delayed in order to secure more face-to-face teaching at university;
  • Mr Johnson has insisted ‘black lives matter’ and condemned the ‘inexcusable’ death of George Floyd but refused to criticise Donald Trumps’ response to protests; 

Priti Patel (pictured in the Commons today) insisted 14-day quarantine for UK arrivals is needed to prevent more deaths

YouGov research found 63 per cent in favour of applying the rule broadly, while 24 per cent said it should only cover countries with high infection rates

YouGov research found 63 per cent in favour of applying the rule broadly, while 24 per cent said it should only cover countries with high infection rates

From Monday, people coming into the UK from abroad will have to quarantine for 14 days to stop the spread of coronavirus

From Monday, people coming into the UK from abroad will have to quarantine for 14 days to stop the spread of coronavirus

A police officer talking to beach-goers in Italy. The UK has more cases of coronavirus per million people than most of the 15 most popular holiday destinations for Britons - including Italy

A police officer talking to beach-goers in Italy. The UK has more cases of coronavirus per million people than most of the 15 most popular holiday destinations for Britons – including Italy

A couple hug each other at Misericordia beach in Malaga. Spain has a far lower level of coronavirus infection rate than the UK

A couple hug each other at Misericordia beach in Malaga. Spain has a far lower level of coronavirus infection rate than the UK

Can Britons head off to their favourite destinations on holiday this summer?

France 

How many British visitors each year? 8.5million 

Can you visit? No. Its borders are closed to all tourists until June 15 at the earliest. Any foreigner arriving, including Britons, must go into 14-day quarantine.  

Is there anything open? Thousands of Britons have second homes in France. Hotels, B&Bs, campsites and gites open for French citizens from June 3. Cafes and restaurants are also open – but in Paris only ones with outside space can serve customers.   

Italy 

How many British visitors each year? 4.3million 

Can you visit?  Yes. Its borders open from today and there is no mandatory quarantining at all.

Is there anything open? Hotels are slowly opening from today while all campsites are now up and running. Beaches are open with social distancing and bars and restaurants are serving.  

Spain 

How many British visitors each year? 15.6million

Can you visit? No. Spain will open its borders from July 1. There is no quarantine planned but Britain is currently not on its list of agreed visitors because its coronavirus infection and death rates ‘still have to improve’. 

Is there anything open? Yes, but still limited options. Beaches are reopening with strict capacity numbers. Many hotels, restaurants and bars remain closed but are slowly reopening to be ready for the end of the month. 

Portugal 

How many British visitors each year? 2.8million

Can you visit? No, but probably soon. Borders are open but not currently to Britain. Although the two Governments are expected to agree an ‘air bridge’ meaning citizens can travel between the two nations with no quarantine. 

Is there anything open? Yes. Most hotels, B&Bs and campsites are expected to be open in the next fortnight. Beaches are fully open from the weekend onwards.  Golf courses are opening too.

United States 

How many British visitors each year? 3.9million

Can you visit? No. President Trump banned all EU visitors in mid-March but has said he soon will ‘start to open up’ to Europeans soon. There are still commercial flights between the UK and US.

Is there anything open? New York lockdown is not expected to ease until next week at the earliest – but on the west coast beaches, restaurants and beauty spots are opening. Restrictions vary from state to state.

Greece 

How many British visitors each year? 2.4million

Can you visit? No. Tourists are banned until mid-June. Border guards will test people arriving from high risk destinations. Mandatory quarantine of seven days is required. And the Greek Government has already said it will not accept flights from 13 UK airports, excluding Heathrow. 

Is there anything open? Yes. Hotels, tavernas and bars are open but with restrictions on numbers. Beaches are free to use and ferries still run between islands.  

Australia 

How many British visitors each year? 493,000

Can you visit? No. Only Australian citizens can enter – and they must go into quarantine for two weeks. There are plans to run an air corridor with neighbouring New Zealand from the Autumn.

Is there anything open? Yes. Restaurants and bars can operate with a maximum of 50 people. Pubs are open to diners not drinkers. Some, but not all, beaches are open.  

New Zealand 

How many British visitors each year? 128,000

Can you visit? Only NZ citizens can jet in – and as in Australia they must quarantine for 14 days on arrival. They will probably reopen an air corridor with Australia and Pacific islands from September.  

Is there anything open? As cases plummet, social distancing could end as early as next week – but gatherings will not exceed 100 people. Most businesses, including hotels, are now open.

United Arab Emirates

How many British visitors each year? 1.4million

Can you visit? No. But tourists could be allowed back in from July 1. A 14-day quarantine is likely. 

Is there anything open? Yes. Hotels, beaches, shopping centres and parks opened in May but face masks are mandatory. 

South Africa 

How many British visitors each year? 440,000 visits a year 

Can you visit? No. The South African borders are closed to all visitors. Experts believe this will remain in place until February 2021 with South Africans not allowed to holiday in the country themselves until Christmas. 

Is there anything open? No. Wildlife and safari parks, beaches, beauty spots and restaurants are all shut. 

Portugal’s foreign minister Augusto Santos Silva revealed this morning that his country is in discussions with the UK about forming an air bridge so tourists can avoid being quarantined, telling the BBC that ‘quarantine is an enemy of tourism’. 

He added: ‘During these weeks our diplomats will work together in order to guarantee that British tourists coming to Portugal would not be subjected on their return to England to any kind of quarantine.’

Germany will lift a travel ban for European Union member states plus Britain, Iceland, Norway, Liechtenstein and Switzerland from 15 June as long as there are no entry bans or large-scale lockdowns in those countries, the foreign minister said.

But Foreign Minister Heiko Maas said Germans would be urged not to travel to the UK while 14-day quarantine is in place.

Ms Patel told the Commons that the government was ‘taking a proportionate and time-limited approach to protect the health of the British people’.

She said arrivals will be required to fill in a ‘contact locator form’, including details on where they will isolate and how they can be contacted.

She said: ‘The form must be completed in advance of travel to provide details of the journey and Border Force will be at the front line of enforcing this requirement.

‘Passengers require a receipt, either printed or on their phone, to prove they have completed the form.

‘Border Force will undertake spot checks at the border and may refuse entry to non-resident nationals who refuse to comply. They will have the power to impose a £100 fixed penalty notice to those who don’t comply.’

Ms Patel said the data collected will be used by Public Health England, which will undertake checks to ensure people understand and follow the rules, adding: ‘If Public Health England has reason to believe someone is not following the law as they should be, they will inform the police.’

A breach of self-isolation could result in a £1,000 fixed penalty notice in England, or potential prosecution, Ms Patel added.

Labour’s shadow home secretary Nick Thomas-Symonds called for the Government to be clear on the scientific advice surrounding its plans to introduce a quarantine for overseas arrivals. 

He said: ‘If these measures are necessary from June 8, why have they not been necessary in recent weeks or from when they were first announced by the Home Secretary herself on May 22? 

‘And can the Home Secretary give me her assurance these measures from Monday next week have been recommended and approved by SAGE?’ 

Senior Tory Dr Fox said: I’m afraid I simply cannot get my head around the public health mental gymnastics of this policy.

‘If such a barrier was required, why was it not introduced earlier in the outbreak.

‘And if it is a contingency measure against a second wave, why apply it to countries with a lower infection rate than we already have.

‘Surely the answer lies in the government’s test-and-trace system, rather than unnecessary economic isolation.’ 

The 14-day quarantine scheme will be reviewed on June 29 to see whether low case numbers in some destinations might allow the measures to be relaxed on a country-by-country basis. 

A Downing Street source said: ‘We will be guided by the science, but the PM does not want to be standing in the way of people’s holidays unnecessarily.’ 

Health minister Edward Argar said earlier that he hoped people would be able to go on holiday this year.

He told Today: ‘I’m not going to say a particular date on when that might happen because we will have to be guided by how the disease behaves, controlling any risk of a second wave and controlling the disease.

‘I hope that people will be able to go on holiday at some point this year, but I can’t make that promise and because I have to be cautious and go with the science and I don’t have that forward view yet of how a second wave or otherwise might behave.’

Heathrow chief John Holland Kaye warned there was a danger of the ‘health pandemic becoming an unemployment pandemic’. 

He said there had to be an ‘exit plan’ from the quarantine plan to avert huge redundancies. 

‘If we don’t get a plan from the Government in the next few days on how we are going to reopen the economy, those jobs are at risk,’ he said.

‘I am going to have to make that decision in the next few weeks about jobs in my own company.

‘We need to stop this health pandemic becoming an unemployment pandemic.’

In a glimmer of hope for airlines, it has emerged that commercial flights will resume at London City Airport by the end of June.

Domestic routes will be the first to restart, with international flights ‘depending on the proposed quarantine of passengers arriving into the UK’, according to a statement.

London City’s runway has been closed to commercial and private flights since March 25 due to travel restrictions and the collapse in demand.

Leading travel operators still fear they will have to lay off 60 per cent of their staff, however. 

And the London Chambers of Commerce warned today that the policy sends out the message that the UK is ‘closed for business’.

Chief executive Paul Scully said: ‘Domestically, the Government’s roadmap to restarting the economy is correctly centred on a risk-based approach. 

‘Yet this blanket aviation proposal doesn’t appear to be risk-based. 

‘If it was, it would recognise that arrivals from some countries with much lower transmission levels than the UK and low incidence of the disease would not increase our risk, provided they adopted our social distancing protocols on arrival. 

‘The proposal sends out the message that the UK is closed for business, at a time when we are beginning to restart our economy.’ 

The news came as it emerged that nearly every country popular with Britons as a summer holiday destination has a lower coronavirus infection rate than the UK. 

The UK currently has more cases of coronavirus per million people than most of the 15 most popular holiday destinations for Britons. 

Only the US and Portugal have a higher infection rate with places like France, Spain, Greece and Italy all drastically lower than Britain. 

The data is sure to fuel the anger of opponents of the quarantine, after some 124 chief executive and owners of businesses worth a combined £5billion said they expect to make up to 60 per cent of their staff redundant if the scheme goes ahead.

Details of the quarantine scheme, which is due to come into force on Monday June 8, were expected to be revealed to MPs yesterday. 

But Downing Street confirmed that Home Secretary Priti Patel is now expected to unveil them later today, fuelling suggestions that some sort of compromise could be on the cards. 

Health Secretary Matt Hancock said yesterday he was growing ‘more optimistic’ about the prospect of Britons taking holidays abroad this year.  

Ms Patel will face rebellious Conservative MPs in the Commons later, warning them that opposition to the quarantine plan risk alienating the public and throwing away the country’s progress in tackling coronavirus. 

The 14-day quarantine scheme will be reviewed on June 29 to see whether low case numbers in some destinations might allow the measures to be relaxed on a country-by-country basis.

Leading travel operators still fear they will have to lay off 60 per cent of their staff however.  

Mr Johnson has been told to drops the plans to force visitors and returning British nationals to self-isolate for 14 days to avoid a ‘catastrophic’ hammer blow to the tourism and hospitality industries. 

MPs have also branded the curbs ‘ridiculous’ and ‘pointless’ after it emerged people will be allowed to pop out for food, only a fifth face spot checks, and officials will not be allowed to enter their homes.     

Under that plan, agreements between Britain and countries with low infection rates would allow people from those nations to visit the UK without self-isolating. 

Asked about the government’s policy in the evening Downing Street press briefing, Mr Hancock hinted at friction within the cabinet: ‘This air bridge idea has been floated. 

‘I know there has been a lot of discussion about it and I know that some countries have been mentioned in the media but that is a piece of work that is being done by the Home office and the DfT and I’m not going to tread on the toes of my colleagues no matter how tempting it is.’

The Health Secretary also said that all measures taken by the government, including those related to travellers, were taken with people’s safety as the key consideration.  

The new quarantine rules will allow people subject to the 14-day restrictions to leave their place of isolation for a number of reasons, including shopping for food. 

Travellers will also be able to board public transport from the port or airport to where they will quarantine, although they will be encouraged to use private vehicles instead. 

Heathrow chief warns over an ‘unemployment pandemic’ 

Heathrow’s chief railed against the quarantine place today warning there is a danger of the ‘health pandemic becoming an unemployment pandemic’. 

John Holland Kaye said there had to be an ‘exit plan’ from the restrictions to avert huge redundancies. 

‘If we don’t get a plan from the Government in the next few days on how we are going to reopen the economy, those jobs are at risk,’ he said.

‘I am going to have to make that decision in the next few weeks about jobs in my own company.

‘We need to stop this health pandemic becoming an unemployment pandemic.’

In a glimmer of hope for airlines, it has emerged that commercial flights will resume at London City Airport by the end of June.

Domestic routes will be the first to restart, with international flights ‘depending on the proposed quarantine of passengers arriving into the UK’, according to a statement.

London City’s runway has been closed to commercial and private flights since March 25 due to travel restrictions and the collapse in demand.

 

But the rules will only be in place for an initial three weeks, with the first review on June 29. 

Campaigner George Morgan-Grenville, the chief executive of tour operator Red Savannah, said: ‘By pursuing its quarantine plans without due regard for the economic consequences, the Government is choosing to ignore the devastation it will cause to companies, to employment and to the lives of all those whose jobs will be lost.

‘The quarantine measures are a blunt weapon which will bring only economic disaster.’

Ministers are also facing a major Tory rebellion over the issue.  

Whitehall sources said the quarantine plan had been championed by the PM’s chief adviser Dominic Cummings. 

But Mr Johnson is said to have been taken aback by the scale of opposition from within his own party.

Meanwhile, former Tory leader Iain Duncan Smith said travellers should not face quarantine unless arriving from a country with a higher infection rate than the UK’s.

A Government spokesman said: ‘Our priority will always be to protect the public’s health and these new measures are being introduced to do exactly this. We have received clear science advice and the quarantine system is designed to keep the transmission rate down, stop new cases being brought in from abroad and help prevent a devastating second wave of coronavirus.

‘We are supporting businesses in the tourism sector through one of the most generous economic packages provided anywhere in the world and we will continue to look at options to increase international travel, when it is safe to do so, as we move forward.’ 

The rules are due to take effect on Monday, but a there are growing signs the measures will be scaled back again when they are reviewed in three weeks. 

The air bridges plan, championed by Transport Secretary Grant Shapps, could see restrictions eased on countries like Australia and Greece with low levels of coronavirus. 

It offers some hopes of summer holidays for Britons as the nation struggles to get back to normal after months of lockdown. 

Ministers are expected to use a five-point assessment to judge which countries could be prioritised for the agreements. 

The criteria could include the economic and cultural ties to the UK, the infection rate and the level of health screening at departure airports.  

A country’s R rate of infection is likely to be the key factor in whether an air bridge agreement is considered.   

Just 23 people used Gatwick Airport in an entire day last week - down from its pre-covid average of 45,000

Just 23 people used Gatwick Airport in an entire day last week – down from its pre-covid average of 45,000

The news comes as MPs urged the government to rethink the 14-day quarantine to avoid killing off the airline industry.    

How UK coronavirus cases compare to 15 popular holiday destinations for Britons  

Tourism bosses and MPs have discussed air bridges to popular tourist destinations and countries who send large numbers of tourist to the UK.

Here is how the UK’s coronavoirus cases compare to popular nations. The figures are the daily confirmed cases of coronavirus per million people for each country, as of June 1.

UK – 28.52

SPAIN – 4.30

FRANCE – 3.94

ITALY – 5.87

USA – 59.84

GREECE – 0.19

PORTUGAL – 29.13

NETHERLANDS – 10.80

TURKEY – 9.85

IRELAND – 12.35

GERMANY – 3.98

BELGIUM – 16.82

MEXICO – 24.45

MOROCCO – 0.73

AUSTRALIA – 0.39

NEW ZEALAND – 0

Tory MP Henry Smith, whose Crawley constituency covers Gatwick, said low passengers at the airport last week highlighted the scale of the problem.   

He said: ‘It’s well-intentioned but it hasn’t been thought through.

‘It sounds good, to stop people at the borders so we don’t get re-infections of Covid-19. But I don’t think it is going to be a benefit to public health and will prolong the economic damage.’

Travel industry experts say quarantine, will cost Britain’s tourism sector as much as £15billion if it is maintained throughout the summer.

Under the plans, people arriving in the UK from Britain, including citizens returning from abroad, will have to self-isolate for two weeks. 

There are exemptions for groups including lorry drivers, health workers and scientists. 

Spot checks will be carried out on addresses and fines of £1,000 could be imposed on people breaking the rules.

But according to the Guardian, only a fifth of arrivals will be subject to spot checks. 

People will be able to give more than one address where they will be self-isolating – and will also be allowed to go out to buy food – including for pets – or medicine.

‘To get caught, you will either have to be unlucky or stupid,’ one source said.  

Like the wider lockdown measures, the plans will be reviewed every three weeks.

Former transport minister Stephen Hammond asked what the point of the quarantine was when it could be dodged relatively easily.

The Tory MP told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme that air bridges would be a ‘sensible, targeted response’ between low-risk countries.

‘I think the idea of air bridges are the right way forward,’ he added.

‘I think, as we’ve seen across the world, people are taking measures out of the lockdown and this targeted approach would be a much more sensible way to behave.’

The air bridges idea was first floated by Mr Shapps last month, before being played down by No10 sources.

However, sources told the Telegraph that Mr Johnson is now ‘personally in favour’ of the plan. 

Priti Patel, the home secretary, is thought to remain sceptical. 

Travel companies are offering up to 65 per cent off summer holidays – but tourism experts are warning Britons the trips may not end up going ahead.

The bargain packages are being advertised on booking sites for as early as July in a bid to salvage the season.

It came as last night the holiday dreams of millions of Britons were given a boost after Portugal and Greece said they were ready to welcome back UK tourists within days.

Tui, Britain’s biggest tour operator, is cutting three nights all-inclusive at the TUI SUNEO Odessos in Bulgaria on July 10 from £543 per person to £296. And a seven-night trip to Gran Canaria on July 6 has been slashed from £606 to £394.

Travel Zoo is offering two nights in Paris in September for £79 – up to 64 per cent cheaper than usual.

And easyJet Holidays is selling a week-long stay at Anseli Hotel in Rhodes from July 8 for £195 with flights and transfers.

But experts have warned desperate Britons to hold off booking for now.

The Foreign Office still advises against all but essential travel and there will be a two-week quarantine for returning holidaymakers from June 8.

Rory Boland, editor of Which? Travel, said: ‘If consumers are keen to book something now they should go into it with their eyes open.

‘If the FCO advice is still in place when their holiday is due to take place, they will get a refund, but there’s a good chance they will be waiting a long time.

‘Holiday providers need to make it clear to their customers that these holidays may not take place.’

The UK quarantine will be reviewed every three weeks. TUI spokesman Liz Edwards said they hope it will be lifted on June 29 in time for summer trips.

She added: ‘We believe we will be having summer holidays this year, hopefully from July. We hope the quarantine will be lifted, but air bridges are certainly a possibility.

‘Bookings have been really picking up. Spain, Greece, Cyprus are likely to open up first. The Canaries and Balearics are keen to welcome back tourists.’

Airlines are also heavily discounting flights. A Heathrow to Cancun return with Air France in September, which usually sells for around £800, is being advertised for £312.

And return flights from Manchester to Reykjavik with easyJet in November are being sold for £41 (usually £150 plus), and Manchester to Dubrovnik with Jet2 from £30 one-way in late June (usually around £120).

Emma Coulthurst, from TravelSupermarket, said: ‘The 14-day quarantine measure makes holidays pretty impractical, although I have heard of some people willing to do it to get a holiday. There is a risk booking now as there is no guarantee the holiday will go ahead.’

Research by TUI revealed the most popular destinations for trips this year are Spain, Greece and Italy followed by Florida and the Caribbean.

AREAS WITH THE MOST AND LEAST COVID-19 DEATHS

According to ONS data for England and Wales up to May 22, these are the areas that had recorded the most and least deaths from the coronavirus: 

MOST DEATHS

  1. Birmingham (1,082) 
  2. Leeds (605)
  3. County Durham (567)
  4. Liverpool (529)
  5. Sheffield (498)
  6. Brent (465)
  7. Croydon (458)
  8. Barnet (442)
  9. Cheshire East (417)
  10. Bradford (416)

FEWEST DEATHS

  1. Isles of Scilly (0)
  2. City of London (5)  
  3. Ceredigion (7)
  4. Hastings (8)
  5. South Hams (12)
  6. Rutland (15)
  7. Mid Devon (15)
  8. West Devon (15)
  9. Norwich (17)
  10. Mendip (18)

And those hoping to go to Greece or Portugal this summer could still get the chance.

Officials in Lisbon believe Britain has coronavirus ‘under control’ and want quarantine-free travel between the two countries to restart from this Saturday.

Greece’s tourism minister Harry Theocharis told the Mail the epidemic was moving ‘in the right direction’ in the UK and restrictions could be dropped for Britons from June 15.

The interventions increased pressure on Downing Street to re-think its plan for a ‘blanket’ 14-day quarantine amid a growing backlash from MPs at being denied a vote on the measures.

Ms Patel will now introduce the regulations in Parliament to come into effect from next Monday.

But they will be brought as a statutory instrument, which does not automatically go to a vote. Tory MPs are expecting the government to give a strong signal on air bridges to head off an outright rebellion.

Under the plans, anyone entering the country by plane, train or boat will have to go into quarantine for two weeks.

This will apply to foreign tourists as well as Britons returning from abroad.

However, some people, including medical professionals and lorry drivers, will be exempt.

MPs among a cross-party group of at least 40 who are critical of the plans last night voiced their fury.

They want the Government to leave open the option of creating ‘air bridges’ – which would allow tourists between two countries to visit without needing to quarantine – to salvage as much of the summer holiday season as possible and help keep the hard-hit tourism industry afloat.

They say, instead of quarantine, arrivals to the UK could be subject to health checks or testing.

Industry chiefs say millions of Britons are desperate for a foreign getaway, but the blanket quarantine policy has all but cancelled summer holidays.

Former Cabinet minister David Davis said: ‘Parliament should be properly involved and quite plainly it is not. In this particular case, its very blanket policy could reasonably be amended in a number of ways. 

‘For example, our death rate is many, many times than that in Greece. So the idea of quarantining someone coming from Greece who would have a much lower risk of suffering from the disease than someone anywhere else in Britain is plainly not supported by any sort of science.

‘The idea of putting in air bridges might be a sensible amendment.’

Former environment secretary Theresa Villiers said: ‘I would very much prefer the quarantine rules be targeted on flights from Covid hotspots.

‘I appreciate why the Government is bringing in quarantine but I do think that applying it in a blanket way across the board is an over-reaction.’

Sir Graham Brady, chairman of the influential 1922 Committee of Tory backbenchers, said: ‘I hope the Government will move swiftly to introduce air bridges and also to introduce a testing regime at airports as quickly as possible.’

Downing Street last night insisted it still intended to push ahead with the policy.

It has stressed quarantine will be reviewed every three weeks and has left open the possibility of striking air bridge deals in future.

But the first review period would not be until June 29. 

It comes as a leading expert predicted today that Britain is on track to have zero Covid-19 deaths by July – as health chiefs announced 324 more coronavirus fatalities. 

Professor Carl Heneghan, an Oxford University epidemiologist, expects no ‘excess deaths’ when weekly data taking into account suspected and confirmed deaths is published next Tuesday.  

The week ending May 22 had the fewest coronavirus deaths of any seven-day period since Britain's lockdown began in March. The Office for National Statistics showed that 1,983 people died in England and Wales in the week ending May 22, down from 2,766 a week earlier

The week ending May 22 had the fewest coronavirus deaths of any seven-day period since Britain’s lockdown began in March. The Office for National Statistics showed that 1,983 people died in England and Wales in the week ending May 22, down from 2,766 a week earlier

The weekly death toll in England and Wales dropped to its lowest levels since the lockdown began, an Office for National Statistics (ONS) report said today. A total of 1,983 people in England and Wales died with Covid-19 in the week ending May 22, down almost 30 per cent in a week and the lowest figure for two months.  

Both England and Wales – which suffered 16,000 deaths during the darkest fortnight of the crisis in April – are now en route to the way they were before the unprecedented lockdown was imposed on March 23.  

But sobering statistics also show that there have now been nearly 50,000 people killed by Covid-19 across the UK this year, cementing Britain’s position as one of the worst-hit countries in the world. And other estimates looking at ‘excess deaths’ – deemed the most reliable measure to work out the true scale of an infectious disease outbreak – show 62,000 more fatalities were recorded during the pandemic than expected.

It comes as the UK Government this week starts to move the nation out of lockdown and back to work and school as the number of new deaths and cases continue to tumble. 

Department of Health figures today revealed the official death toll has jumped to 39,369 – an increase of 324 on yesterday. For comparison, 111 fatalities were registered yesterday, as well as 134 last Tuesday – a figure much lower than expected due to a recording lag on the bank holiday Monday.  

At this evening’s press Downing Street press conference, Health Secretary Matt Hancock said the trend for daily infections is ‘broadly down but there is still some way to go’, as the total number of positive tests neared 278,000. 

Mr Hancock said the number of new admissions for Covid-19 in England has fallen to the lowest since March 20, and demonstrates progress against the disease. Daily admissions are down seven per cent since last Tuesday.  

The Department of Health revealed 324 more people had died across all settings. 

Each nation’s health agency reported their own figures earlier today – including 12 in Scotland, seven in Wales and two in Northern Ireland. These figures do not always match with the DH count because of a difference in how they are recorded.

Today’s official Government figure, which brings the total closer to 40,000, is 68 per cent lower than the Tuesday a fortnight ago, when 545 deaths were recorded following a lag in reporting over the bank holiday. 

Processes for recording people’s deaths are known for slowing down and even stopping at the weekends and on bank holidays, meaning there is a dip every Monday, followed by surges on Tuesdays.   

The weekly report from ONS said there were 12,288 deaths registered in England and Wales in the week ending May 22, known as ‘Week 21’.

This was 2,285 less than the previous week – but still 2,348 more than usual for this time of year.

Professor Heneghan, director of the Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine, University of Oxford said he expects deaths to be back to normal by next week. 

Asked during a Science Media Centre briefing whether he expects deaths from Covid-19 to stop or plateau, Professor Heneghan said: ‘If the trends continue, the deaths look like they will be back to where they should be normally by next week.

‘There’s been a continued reduction in hospital deaths, care home outbreaks are coming down so the ‘all deaths’ by (week) 22 I’m expecting will be back to where we should be.’

Professor Heneghan said there may be no Covid-19 deaths by the end of June – which would follow Spain yesterday. Italy is still reporting between 50 and 100 deaths per day, and France around 30.

‘But it also depends on what happens next, within sporadic outbreaks,’ Professor Heneghan said.

He warned that there will be spikes in deaths with further outbreaks in care homes, and said information on how many people are catching the virus in hospital would ‘give us a really good understanding of the spreading of this disease’.

Professor Kevin McConway, emeritus professor of applied statistics at The Open University, said: ‘I certainly don’t want to be a prophet of gloom, but I would urge some caution about these positive trends. 

‘The new week’s data would not yet have been affected by the loosening of the lockdown. That began to happen in the previous week (ending 15 May), though most changes occurred much more recently.

‘If any of the changes turn out to have increased infections, that won’t show up in death statistics yet anyway, because obviously there is a time gap between infection and death. But we’ll see eventually.’ 

Obese children hospitalized with coronavirus THREE TIMES more likely to need ventilators, study says


Obese children hospitalized with coronavirus are THREE TIMES more likely to need ventilators, study finds

  • Researchers looked at 50 coronavirus pediatric patients hospitalized at NewYork-Presbyterian Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital
  • Obesity was the most chronic health condition with 19 patients either being obese or overweight
  • 60% of obese pediatric patients with coronavirus were characterized as having ‘severe disease’
  • About 67% of obese kids were placed on the breathing machines compared to 20% of non-obese kids
  • Here’s how to help people impacted by Covid-19

Children infected with the novel coronavirus who are overweight or obese are more likely to be critically ill, a new study looking at 50 patients suggests.

Researchers from Columba University Irving Medical Center found obesity occurred in 60 percent of pediatric patients characterized as having ‘severe disease.’

What’s more, obese children were three times more likely to need to be placed on a ventilator than children with average weights.  

A new study found that 67% of obese coronavirus pediatric patients were placed on the breathing machines compared to 20% of non-obese kids. Pictured: Jayden Hardowar, eight, from New York, who is not obese, was placed on a ventilator last month

About 60% of obese pediatric patients with coronavirus were characterized as having 'severe disease'. Pictured: Bobby Dean, nine, from Rochester, New York, was hospitalized with coronavirus this year

About 60% of obese pediatric patients with coronavirus were characterized as having ‘severe disease’. Pictured: Bobby Dean, nine, from Rochester, New York, was hospitalized with coronavirus this year

For the study, published in JAMA Pediatrics, the team examined 50 patients under 21 years old hospitalized at NewYork-Presbyterian Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital.

The median time from the development of symptoms to hospital admission was about two days.

However, it was longer for adolescents (four days) compared to younger children and infants (one day).

The majority of patients – 80 percent – had fever or respiratory symptoms, but three patients only had gastrointestinal symptoms when they were diagnosed.  

Obesity and being overweight, 19 out of the 50 patients, was the most chronic health condition among the children.

Researchers found that children with obesity who were older than than age two were three times more likely to be put on a ventilator.

About 67 percent of obese kids were placed on the breathing machines compared to 20 percent of non-obese kids.  

Several earlier reports have found that being overweight is a major risk factor for people sick with coronavirus.

A study of the 2009 H1N1 flu pandemic, found that obese people were twice as likely to be hospitalized compared with the state population.

This means that obese people diagnosed with COVID-19 could put an even further strain on already overwhelmed hospitals. 

Additionally, a recent study from the University of Michigan School of Public Health found that obese adults who become infected with the flu are not only at a greater risk of severe complications, but remain contagious longer.

This means that obesity is tied to an increased risk of flu transmission, and likely holds true for COVID-19, the disease caused by the new virus.  

‘The significance of obesity as an independent risk factor for severity is now being increasingly described in adult studies of COVID-19, so it was interesting that many of the hospitalized patients in this study had obesity and/or overweight,’ the authors wrote.  

‘Obesity was the most significant factor associated with mechanical ventilation in children [two] years and older. 

In the US, there are more than 1.8 million confirmed cases of the virus and more than 106,000 deaths. 

George Floyd’s roommate says he would NEVER use fake cash, take drugs and barely drank alcohol


The $20 bill that instigated the arrest of George Floyd and its tragic consequences may not have been a fake – and if it was, Floyd would have never intentionally used counterfeit cash, his roommate claims.  

Floyd’s roommate of four years, Alvin Manago, 55, exclusively told DailyMail.com that Floyd was a stand-up guy and if he did use a counterfiet bill at the store before his death, it was ‘unintentional’.  

‘I’ve never known Floyd to use any counterfeit money. If he tried to pass along a counterfeit $20 bill it was unintentional,’ Manago said. ‘He probably didn’t know the money was fake. 

‘I’m just not sure why the store employees didn’t just tell him it was a fake $20. They all knew him them. He was a regular customer.’

Manago met George Floyd, 46, when they worked together at the Conga Bistro Bar and Grill. Floyd worked security and Manago worked as a bar back. Manago says they had been roommates for almost four years and considers him one of his best friends.

Floyd died last Monday after being killed during an arrest in Minneapolis, Minnesota, for allegedly trying to use a counterfeit $20 at a local market.  

George Floyd's roommate of four years Alvin Manago, 55, tells DailyMail.com that Floyd would never use counterfeit money intentionally

George Floyd’s (right)  roommate of four years Alvin Manago, 55, (left) tells DailyMail.com that Floyd would never use counterfeit money intentionally 

Floyd lived with housemate Alvin Manago at this apartment in Minneapolis, Minneapolis. The property is owned by Floyds former employer Jovanni Thunstrom

Floyd lived with housemate Alvin Manago at this apartment in Minneapolis, Minneapolis. The property is owned by Floyds former employer Jovanni Thunstrom

Cell phone video captured former Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin kneeling on Floyd’s neck for several minutes after he was handcuffed. Floyd died hours later at a local hospital.  

Former police officer Derek Chauvin was arrested last week on a third degree murder and manslaughter charges, but Manago believes this is just the beginning.

‘I want to see all of the officers arrested,’ he said. ‘The other officers protected the situation even after George was unconscious.’

Manago also has issues with the probable cause statement. 

Manago said he wasn’t aware of any pre-existing medical conditions listed in the probable cause statement for Floyd.

The arrest warrant states that ‘the autopsy revealed no physical findings that support a diagnosis of traumatic asphyxia or strangulation. Mr. Floyd had underlying health conditions including coronary artery disease and hypertensive heart disease. The combined effects of Mr. Floyd being restrained by the police, his underlying health conditions and any potential intoxicants in his system likely contributed to his death.’

‘I’ve never known Floyd to take any prescription medication apart from some pain pills on one occasion after he was recently released from the hospital. He never mentioned to me about having any medical problems or high blood pressure,’ said Manago.

Manago also said that Floyd barely drank alcohol.

‘He maybe had a shot or a beer. I’ve never seen him drunk or use drugs,’ he added. 

Choking up, Manago said Floyd was a good guy who had turned his life around. ‘He didn’t deserve to die this way. Floyd needs justice,’ he said. 

Manago said he never knew Floyd to use counterfeit money and the transaction must have been unintentional

Manago said he never knew Floyd to use counterfeit money and the transaction must have been unintentional

George Floyd, a 46-year-old black man, died on Memorial Day as he was arrested by four police officers over allegedly trying to buy cigarettes with a counterfeit $20 bill

He was seen in a video pleading that he couldn't breathe as white officer Derek Chauvin pressed his knee against his neck

Floyd died on Memorial Day as he was arrested by four police officers over allegedly trying to buy cigarettes with a counterfeit $20 bill. He was seen in a video pleading that he couldn’t breathe as white officer Derek Chauvin pressed his knee against his neck

‘Floyd would be against the violence and looting. He wouldn’t want people looting and burning buildings in his name. He didn’t promote violence,’ said Manago.

‘He’d be disgusted with what’s going on in the country. I don’t want the looting and rioting attached to his name, he wouldn’t want that.

‘Floyd needs justice. Floyd didn’t deserve to die that way he did.’

Manago also says that Floyd had been exposed to someone who lived with them who had tested positive two months ago for COVID-19. However, he does not believe it had anything to do with his death. 

‘He went to the hospital a few months ago, he was sluggish, throwing up and had diarrhea and complaining of stomach pain. He spent a few days in the hospital and then came back home,’ said Manago.

At about the same time, Manago’s fiancée tested positive for COVID-19. Manago says that he was also tested but the results came back inconclusive. He wasn’t sure if Floyd was ever tested for the virus but said he displayed all of the symptoms of having it.

Derek Chauvin, 44, was arrested Friday on charges of third-degree murder and manslaughter in the death of George Floyd, which has sparked violent protests

Derek Chauvin, 44, was arrested Friday on charges of third-degree murder and manslaughter in the death of George Floyd, which has sparked violent protests

Manago said, ‘The health care workers told me that there was no reason to come back for another test since we lived with someone who tested positive for the coronavirus and have been exposed to it. So we should just treat it like we have it and self-quarantine.’ 

After Floyd was discharged from the hospital he came home and rested. Manago said he never found out exactly why Floyd spent time in the hospital, but is convinced they both had coronavirus.

As DailyMail.com exclusively revealed, Chauvin has been moved to one of the nation’s most secure prison to ‘ensure he’s not murdered behind bars’ according to law enforcement sources.

Chauvin was arrested last Friday and housed in the Ramsey County Jail in nearby St. Paul, Minnesota. On Sunday afternoon, he was transferred to the Hennepin County Jail in Minneapolis, then hours later transferred yet again to a correctional facility in Oak Heights, Minnesota –  the state’s only Level 5 maximum security prison.

Commissioner of Corrections Paul Schnell said Chauvin was moved to prison because of concerns about coronavirus and the huge influx of people being booked into Twin Cities jails on public order offenses.

‘First and foremost, we have a COVID situation. Second of all, a large number of people could be booked into Hennepin County Jail,’ Schnell said.

It’s highly unusual to lock defendants up in prison before they have been convicted, however officials did something similar in the case of disgraced Minneapolis officer Mohamed Noor who shot dead a woman in 2017 while responding to her 911 call.

‘The move to DOC custody was made out of an abundance of caution to ensure he is safely held and after concern about space in the jail due to large numbers of arrests related to the unrest over the last few nights,’ a spokesman said.

‘The DOC also took custody of former officer Mohamed Noor during the time he was in custody before being officially committed to our custody at sentencing, after a similar request in that case.

‘The processing of his [Chauvin’s] transfer to OPH, including the taking of photos, in being completed this morning. He will appear, with official photos, on the public database of inmates after that process is completed.

‘He is being held in administrative segregation outside the general population of the facility.’

Derek Chauvin has been moved to Oak Park Heights Prison in Minnesota (pictured), a maximum security prison

Derek Chauvin has been moved to Oak Park Heights Prison in Minnesota (pictured), a maximum security prison 

Administrative segregation, a form of solitary confinement known as ‘in the hole’, is employed when inmates are deemed to be at grave risk of being attacked by other prisoners or because they pose a significant danger to others.

According to recent data released by the Minnesota Department of Corrections, the Oak Park Heights Prison currently houses 297 murderers, 69 sexual predators and eight kidnappers.

Some 46 percent of the prison population is black.

The 160-acre, rural prison is carved into the side of a hill and has been featured on the National Geographic show America’s Hardest Prisons.

Cells are 7 by 10 feet with cement slab bed and toilets and sink made of steel so they can’t be broken off to use as weapons.

The reinforced windows are said to be so secure that it would take 12,000 hacksaw blades to cut though the steel bars.

Chauvin will be held at the prison until next Monday, June 8th where he is scheduled to appear in a downtown Minneapolis courtroom for the first time since his arrest.

Thousands of Black Lives Matter protestors head for London’s Hyde Park


Thousands of Black Lives Matter protesters including singer Liam Payne and actor John Boyega gathered in London today as a show of force against the death of George Floyd in the US.

Huge crowds gathered in Hyde Park this afternoon despite ongoing social distancing rules as many campaigners wore face coverings and held signs with messages such as ‘Please, I can’t breathe’, ‘BLM’ and ‘Colour ≠ Crime’.

The rally comes as global demonstrations gather pace following the death of 46-year-old black man Mr Floyd who died after white police officer Derek Chauvin put his knee on his neck for nine minutes in Minneapolis on May 25. 

Today, Star Wars star Boyega told the crowd: ‘Black lives have always mattered. We have always been important. We have always meant something. We have always succeeded regardless. And now is the time. I ain’t waiting.’

Police were generally keeping in the background of the protest while their helicopters circled above. Banners included ‘Enough is Enough’, ‘Remember Smiley Culture’, ‘Remember Cherry Groce’, and ‘UK is not innocent’.

One protester wore a Colin Kaepernick shirt after the black American footballer who started the knee protest in the US. Thousands of demonstrators at times went down on one knee chanting ‘George Floyd, George Floyd.’

It comes after UK chief constables joined forces to say they were ‘appalled and horrified’ by the death and called for ‘justice and accountability’, while warning those attending protests to do so while maintaining a safe distance.  

Separately, anti-racism campaign group Stand Up to Racism is urging Britons to ‘take the knee’ on their doorsteps at 6pm tonight for a protest against discrimination which is also backing the Black Lives Matter movement. 

Protesters shout during a Black Lives Matter demonstration at Hyde Park in London this afternoon

Demonstrators observe social distancing as they meet in London's Hyde Park today to protest against George Floyd's death

Demonstrators observe social distancing as they meet in London’s Hyde Park today to protest against George Floyd’s death

Supporters at the protest in London this afternoon wear face coverings and hold up signs with messages including: 'We will remember the silence of our friends' and 'If you're not angry you're not paying attention'

Supporters at the protest in London this afternoon wear face coverings and hold up signs with messages including: ‘We will remember the silence of our friends’ and ‘If you’re not angry you’re not paying attention’

An aerial photograph of Black Lives Matter protesters at Hyde Park in London this afternoon

An aerial photograph of Black Lives Matter protesters at Hyde Park in London this afternoon

John Boyega, pictured with a megaphone, attended the rally

Musician Liam Payne, pictured with girlfriend Maya Henry, attended the rally

Actor John Boyega, pictured left with a megaphone, and musician Liam Payne, pictured right with girlfriend Maya Henry, were among the celebrities to attend today’s rally in London

Star Wars star Boyega tells the crowd in London today: 'Black lives have always mattered. We have always been important'

Star Wars star Boyega tells the crowd in London today: ‘Black lives have always mattered. We have always been important’ 

Boyega said of black people in London today: 'We have always meant something. We have always succeeded regardless'

Boyega during the protest in London today

Boyega said of black people in London today: ‘We have always meant something. We have always succeeded regardless’

The demonstrators are pictured in this aerial view during the Black Lives Matter protest in London this afternoon

The demonstrators are pictured in this aerial view during the Black Lives Matter protest in London this afternoon

Protesters hold up a number of different signs during the event, at Hyde Park in London today, including one which read: 'Use your white privilege, save lives'

Protesters hold up a number of different signs during the event, at Hyde Park in London today, including one which read: ‘Use your white privilege, save lives’

A woman is seen with the phrase 'I can't Breathe', uttered by George Floyd before his death, painted on her face at Hyde Park

A woman is seen with the phrase ‘I can’t Breathe’, uttered by George Floyd before his death, painted on her face at Hyde Park

A protester wearing a face mask 'takes the knee', as many others are expected to this evening, at Hyde Park in London today

A protester wearing a face mask ‘takes the knee’, as many others are expected to this evening, at Hyde Park in London today

Demonstrators hold banners during the Black Lives Matter protest at Hyde Park in London this afternoon

Demonstrators hold banners during the Black Lives Matter protest at Hyde Park in London this afternoon 

Protesters march away from Hyde Park during the Black Lives Matter rally in London this afternoon

Protesters march away from Hyde Park during the Black Lives Matter rally in London this afternoon

A joint statement from UK chief constables said today: ‘We stand alongside all those across the globe who are appalled and horrified by the way George Floyd lost his life.

‘Justice and accountability should follow. We are also appalled to see the violence and damage that has happened in so many US cities since then.

‘We are are appalled and horrified’: Full statement from UK chief constables on George Floyd protests 

‘We stand alongside all those across the globe who are appalled and horrified by the way George Floyd lost his life. Justice and accountability should follow.

‘We are also appalled to see the violence and damage that has happened in so many US cities since then. Our hearts go out to all those affected by these terrible events and hope that peace and order will soon be restored.

‘In the UK we have a long established tradition of policing by consent, working in communities to prevent crime and solve problems. Officers are trained to use force proportionately, lawfully and only when absolutely necessary. We strive to continuously learn and improve. We will tackle bias, racism or discrimination wherever we find it.

‘Policing is complex and challenging and sometimes we fall short. When we do, we are not afraid to shine a light on injustices or to be held to account.

‘The relationship between the police and the public in the UK is strong but there is always more to do. Every day, up and down the country, officers and staff are working to strengthen those relationships and address concerns. Only by working closely with our communities do we build trust and help keep people safe.

‘We know people want to make their voices heard. The right to lawful protest is key part of any democracy, which UK police uphold and facilitate. But coronavirus remains a deadly disease and there are still restrictions in place to prevent its spread, which include not gathering outside in groups of more than six people. So for whatever reason people want to come together, we ask that people continue to work with officers at this challenging time.’ 

‘Our hearts go out to all those affected by these terrible events and hope that peace and order will soon be restored.’

It added that officers in Britain have a ‘long established tradition of policing by consent, working in communities to prevent crime and solve problems’.

The statement added that forces will ‘tackle bias, racism or discrimination wherever we find it’ but acknowledged that ‘sometimes we fall short’.

It added that police would ‘uphold and facilitate’ the right to lawful protest, but warned demonstrators that the coronavirus lockdown is still in place.

They said: ‘Coronavirus remains a deadly disease and there are still restrictions in place to prevent its spread, which include not gathering outside in groups of more than six people.

‘So for whatever reason people want to come together, we ask that people continue to work with officers at this challenging time.’

Today, Prime Minister Boris Johnson told the Commons that he can understand the anger and the grief felt following the death of Mr Floyd.

SNP Westminster Leader Ian Blackford said: ‘In the seven days since George Floyd was murdered, the UK Government has not even offered words, it has not expressed that pain, it has shuttered itself in the hope no-one would notice.’

He added: ‘Can I ask the Prime Minister what representations has he made to his ally Donald Trump? And at the very least Prime Minister, say it now – black lives matter.’

The Prime Minister responded: ‘Of course black lives matter and I totally understand the anger, the grief that is felt, not just in America but around the world and in our country as well.

‘I totally understand that and I get that and I also support, as I’ve said, the right to protest.

‘The only point I would make to the House is that protests should be carried out lawfully and in this country, protests should be carried out in accordance with our rules on social distancing.’

Also today, Stand Up to Racism has organised a ‘take the knee’ protest for 6pm as part of a day of action against discrimination in response to the death of Mr Floyd.

SUTR said the campaign was inspired by the kneeling protest staged by American football star Colin Kaepernick in 2016 that has become synonymous with the Black Lives Matter movement. 

People participate in a Black Lives Matter protest rally at Hyde Park in London this afternoon

People participate in a Black Lives Matter protest rally at Hyde Park in London this afternoon

People participate in a Black Lives Matter protest rally at Hyde Park in London this afternoon

People participate in a Black Lives Matter protest rally at Hyde Park in London this afternoon

A woman wearing a face mask stands up at Hyde Park in London today, holding a sign saying 'Black Lives Matter'

A woman wearing a face mask stands up at Hyde Park in London today, holding a sign saying ‘Black Lives Matter’

A black man and a white woman hold their hands aloft in a show of defiance during today's protest, attended by thousands

A black man and a white woman hold their hands aloft in a show of defiance during today’s protest, attended by thousands

Protesters take part in a demonstration at Hyde Park in London today over the death of black man George Floyd

Protesters take part in a demonstration at Hyde Park in London today over the death of black man George Floyd

Participants in a Black Lives Matter protest rally at Hyde Park in London today in memory of black man George Floyd

Participants in a Black Lives Matter protest rally at Hyde Park in London today in memory of black man George Floyd

Protesters, some wearing face masks, raise clenched fists during the Black Lives Matter protest in London this afternoon

Protesters, some wearing face masks, raise clenched fists during the Black Lives Matter protest in London this afternoon

People take part in a demonstration today at Hyde Park in London today over the death of George Floyd

People take part in a demonstration today at Hyde Park in London today over the death of George Floyd

A woman holding a megaphone raises her arm in the air as dozens of other protesters, many wearing masks, surround her and applaud

A woman holding a megaphone raises her arm in the air as dozens of other protesters, many wearing masks, surround her and applaud

Campaigners wearing face masks hold up placards and raise clenched fists during the well-attended event at Hyde Park

Campaigners wearing face masks hold up placards and raise clenched fists during the well-attended event at Hyde Park

Protesters take part in a demonstration at Hyde Park in London today over the death of black man George Floyd

Protesters take part in a demonstration at Hyde Park in London today over the death of black man George Floyd

CALIFORNIA: Musician Harry Styles, with a face mask, attended a similar rally yesterday across the Atlantic in Los Angeles

CALIFORNIA: Musician Harry Styles, with a face mask, attended a similar rally yesterday across the Atlantic in Los Angeles

A further demonstration by Black Lives Matter is scheduled for 1pm on Saturday in Parliament Square.

Yesterday, hundreds of people gathered outside St George’s Hall in Liverpool as part of a separate Black Lives Matter protest.

Merseyside Police said in a tweet that while it recognised people’s right to demonstrate peacefully they should still adhere to social distancing guidelines.

It comes as a review by Public Health England found black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) people are at significantly higher risk of dying from Covid-19. 

Four protesters kneel on the ground and hold hands as they came together to demand action over the death of George Floyd

Four protesters kneel on the ground and hold hands as they came together to demand action over the death of George Floyd

People hold banners at Hyde Park in London during the Black Lives Matter protest today

People hold banners at Hyde Park in London during the Black Lives Matter protest today

Protesters wearing face masks hold up signs during a Black Lives Matter protest at Hyde Park in London today

Protesters wearing face masks hold up signs during a Black Lives Matter protest at Hyde Park in London today

Protesters hold up signs during a Black Lives Matter protest in Hyde Park in London today

Protesters hold up signs during a Black Lives Matter protest in Hyde Park in London today

People wearing face masks hold signs at Hyde Park during today's Black Lives Matter" protest

People wearing face masks hold signs at Hyde Park during today’s Black Lives Matter’ protest

People observe social distancing during the Black Lives Matter rally in London this afternoon

People observe social distancing during the Black Lives Matter rally in London this afternoon

A man holds a banner saying 'white silence is violence' during the protest in London today

A man holds a banner saying ‘white silence is violence’ during the protest in London today

People wearing face masks hold banners in Hyde Park during the protest this afternoon

People wearing face masks hold banners in Hyde Park during the protest this afternoon

The protests in London today come after violent demonstations across the United States

The protests in London today come after violent demonstations across the United States

Campaigners are now calling for a public inquiry into the disproportionate impact of Covid-19 on BAME communities.

Weyman Bennett of SUTR said: ‘Racism is the underlying condition that continues to kill black and BAME communities.

‘Take the knee at 6pm because there is a boot on the neck of millions of people in the BAME community.

‘Part of the cure for the virus of racism is to embrace anti-racism and anti-fascism.’ 

Protesters hold up placards as people gather for a demonstration at Hyde Park today over the death of George Floyd

Protesters hold up placards as people gather for a demonstration at Hyde Park today over the death of George Floyd

A protester wearing a face mask holds a sign saying 'I can't breathe' in London this afternoon

A protester wearing a face mask holds a sign saying ‘I can’t breathe’ in London this afternoon

People wearing face masks hold signs in Hyde Park during today's Black Lives Matter protest

People wearing face masks hold signs in Hyde Park during today’s Black Lives Matter protest

A woman wears a face mask saying 'silence is violence' during the protest in London today

A woman wears a face mask saying ‘silence is violence’ during the protest in London today

Four women walk while wearing face masks and holding banners at London's Hyde Park today

Four women walk while wearing face masks and holding banners at London’s Hyde Park today

People participate in a Black Lives Matter protest rally at Hyde Park in London this afternoon

People participate in a Black Lives Matter protest rally at Hyde Park in London this afternoon

People wearing face masks hold banners in Hyde Park during this afternoon's demonstration

People wearing face masks hold banners in Hyde Park during this afternoon’s demonstration

Protesters wearing face masks hold up signs at today's Black Lives Matter protest in London

Protesters wearing face masks hold up signs at today’s Black Lives Matter protest in London

Protesters take part in a demonstration at Hyde Park today over the death of George Floyd in the US

Protesters take part in a demonstration at Hyde Park today over the death of George Floyd in the US

SUTR’s Sabby Dhalu said: ‘BAME communities are suffering disproportionately from Covid-19, economic decline and police brutality.

‘We call on people to ‘take the knee’ on their doorstep in solidarity with George Floyd, at 6pm, Wednesday 3 June. We stand for justice for George Floyd and say Black Lives Matter.’

Large gatherings are still banned under shutdown rules, and yesterday Scottish First Minister Nicola Sturgeon asked protesters to find an alternative to physical demonstrations.

Speaking at her daily briefing in Edinburgh, she said: ‘Right now, it is the case, unfortunately and regrettably, that large gatherings of people could pose a risk to health and indeed to life. 

Protesters wearing face masks gather for the demonstration at Hyde Park this afternoon

Protesters wearing face masks gather for the demonstration at Hyde Park this afternoon

Demonstrators socially distance while gathering for the protest at London's Hyde Park today

Demonstrators socially distance while gathering for the protest at London’s Hyde Park today

People participate in the Black Lives Matter protest rally at Hyde Park in London this afternoon

People participate in the Black Lives Matter protest rally at Hyde Park in London this afternoon

A woman wearing a face mask holds a banner in Hyde Park during the protest this afternoon

A woman wearing a face mask holds a banner in Hyde Park during the protest this afternoon

People wearing face masks hold signs at Hyde Park during today's Black Lives Matter protest

People wearing face masks hold signs at Hyde Park during today’s Black Lives Matter protest

People sit at Hyde Park and hold banners at the Black Lives Matter protest in London today

People sit at Hyde Park and hold banners at the Black Lives Matter protest in London today

People hold banners in Hyde Park during the Black Lives Matter protest in London today

People hold banners in Hyde Park during the Black Lives Matter protest in London today

People hold banners in Hyde Park in London today during a Black Lives Matter protest following the death of George Floyd

People hold banners in Hyde Park in London today during a Black Lives Matter protest following the death of George Floyd

People participate in a Black Lives Matter protest rally in Hyde Park in London this afternoon

People participate in a Black Lives Matter protest rally in Hyde Park in London this afternoon

Activists wear face masks as they hold up signs during today's demonstration at Hyde Park

Activists wear face masks as they hold up signs during today’s demonstration at Hyde Park 

‘We need to find ways of allowing people to make their voices heard and to make the points that many of us want to be made and to be heard right now, but to do so in a way that is safe and is not putting people protesting or wider communities at risk.’

The Met Police said its approach was to engage with protesters and encourage them to follow social distancing rules.

Last Sunday, thousands of people took part in Black Lives Matter protests in London’s Trafalgar Square and outside the US embassy, while demonstrations were also staged in Cardiff and Manchester.

Thousands of people in Dublin protested outside the US embassy on Monday. There were 23 arrests in London on Sunday, at least three of which were for breach of Covid-19 legislation. 

Two people hold up banners during the demonstration at Hyde Park in London this afternoon

Two people hold up banners during the demonstration at Hyde Park in London this afternoon

Protesters wearing face masks hold up signs at today's Black Lives Matter protest in Hyde Park

Protesters wearing face masks hold up signs at today’s Black Lives Matter protest in Hyde Park

Protesters wear face masks and observe social distancing during the protest in London today

Protesters wear face masks and observe social distancing during the protest in London today

People wearing face masks as they sit at Hyde Park during today's Black Lives Matter protest

People wearing face masks as they sit at Hyde Park during today’s Black Lives Matter protest

A woman hands out a Socialist Worker poster with the phrase 'Black Lives Matter' today

A woman hands out a Socialist Worker poster with the phrase ‘Black Lives Matter’ today

A woman wearing a face mask with the message 'I Can't Breathe' is seen in Hyde Park today

A woman wearing a face mask with the message ‘I Can’t Breathe’ is seen in Hyde Park today

A protester wears a mask displaying the words "I can't breathe" at today's protest in London

A protester wears a mask displaying the words ‘I can’t breathe’ at today’s protest in London

A protester holds a sign and face mask during the Black Lives Matter protest in London today

A protester holds a sign and face mask during the Black Lives Matter protest in London today

One person holds up a sign saying 'Isolate for 2 weeks after protest' in London this afternoon

One person holds up a sign saying ‘Isolate for 2 weeks after protest’ in London this afternoon

George Floyd, a 46-year-old black man, died last week

White police officer Derek Chauvin put his knee on Mr Floyd's neck in Minneapolis on May 25 for nine minutes

George Floyd (left), a 46-year-old black man, died last week after white police officer Derek Chauvin (right) put his knee on his neck in Minneapolis on May 25 for nine minutes

US President Donald Trump has declared that ‘the National Guard is ready’ as he repeated his threat to send troops to New York City to ‘put down’ the Floyd protests – but the violence in the city was less severe last night.

Thousands ignored mayor Bill de Blasio’s 8pm curfew to continue their demonstrations, but police arrested more than 200 people as night fell and some of the rampant destruction of the previous few days was quelled.

The calmer scenes were echoed across much of America where protesters once again turned out in force but the confrontations with police were subdued and widespread rioting was limited.

It followed a day of anger from President Trump’s critics over the way he threatened to deploy the military to quell riots across the US and cleared protesters in Washington DC so he could visit damaged St John’s Episcopal Church.