Coronavirus IS man-made,says ex-head of MI6 Sir Richard Dearlove


Ex-head of MI6 Sir Richard Dearlove says coronavirus ‘is man-made’ and was ‘released by accident’ – after seeing ‘important’ scientific report

  • Ex-MI6 chief Sir Richard Dearlove said he believes that Covid-19 is man-made
  • He cited an ‘important’ report which claims virus was manufactured in a lab 
  • Believes China could be forced to pay ‘reparations’ to the rest of the world 
  • Here’s how to help people impacted by Covid-19

The former chief of MI6 has claimed that the coronavirus escaped from a lab in China by accident. 

Sir Richard Dearlove, who was head of the MI6, a role known informally as ‘C’, from 1999 until 2004, said he believes that Covid-19 is man-made. 

He cited an ‘important’ report from Professor Angus Dalgleish of St George’s Hospital, University of London and Norwegian virologist Birger Sorensen which claims the virus was manufactured in a laboratory. 

In the report, scientists claimed to have identified ‘inserted sections placed on the Sars-CoV-2 Spike surface’ which the virus uses to attach onto cells and observed they were ‘significantly different from any Sars we have studied’. 

Sir Richard Dearlove (pictured), who was head of the MI6, a role known informally as ‘C’, from 1999 until 2004, said he believes that Covid-19 is man-made

He cited an 'important' report from Professor Angus Dalgleish of St George's Hospital, University of London and Norwegian virologist Birger Sorensen which claims the virus was manufactured in a laboratory. Above, researchers in a lab at the Wuhan Institute of Virology in Wuhan in central China's Hubei province

He cited an ‘important’ report from Professor Angus Dalgleish of St George’s Hospital, University of London and Norwegian virologist Birger Sorensen which claims the virus was manufactured in a laboratory. Above, researchers in a lab at the Wuhan Institute of Virology in Wuhan in central China’s Hubei province

The Wuhan Institute of Virology in Wuhan in China's central Hubei province pictured above

The Wuhan Institute of Virology in Wuhan in China’s central Hubei province pictured above 

Sir Richard added that the report’s findings could force China to pay ‘reparations’ to the rest of the world due to the damage wrought by the virus.  

‘I do not think that this started as an accident,’ Sir Richard told The Telegraph’s Planet Normal podcast. 

‘It raises the issue, if China ever were to admit responsibility, does it pay reparations?

‘I think it will make every country in the world rethink how it treats its relationship with China.’

Bat soup (pictured) is a delicacy in China. A previous investigation by the World Health Organisation (WHO) found that the virus jumped from bats to humans at the Wuhan wet market where wild animals are kept in cages and slaughtered for meat

Bat soup (pictured) is a delicacy in China. A previous investigation by the World Health Organisation (WHO) found that the virus jumped from bats to humans at the Wuhan wet market where wild animals are kept in cages and slaughtered for meat

The research claimed that current efforts to find a vaccine would prove unsuccessful as scientists have so far misunderstood the true properties of Covid-19. 

Sir Richard suggested that the scientists at a laboratory in Wuhan could have secretly been carrying out experiments on bat coronaviruses when Covid-19 somehow accidentally escaped through a lapse in biosecurity. 

According to the former MI6 chief, the paper had been rewritten several times, and an earlier version apparently claimed coronavirus could accurately be called the ‘Wuhan virus’.

The Wuhan Institute of Virology (pictured) is a biosecurity level four laboratory which researched bat coronaviruses not far from the wet market

The Wuhan Institute of Virology (pictured) is a biosecurity level four laboratory which researched bat coronaviruses not far from the wet market

An earlier version of the report, seen by the Telegraph, reportedly claimed ‘beyond all reasonable doubt that the Covid-19 virus is engineered.’

A previous investigation by the World Health Organisation (WHO) found that the virus jumped from bats to humans at the Wuhan wet market where wild animals are kept in cages and slaughtered for meat. 

The wet market is located not far from the Wuhan Institute of Virology, the only level four biosecurity laboratory lab in China. 

Yet late last month a Chinese official admitted no viruses were detected in animal samples. 

‘At first, we assumed the seafood market might have the virus, but now the market is more like a victim,’ said Gao Fu, director of the Centre for Disease Control and Prevention. 

Glee’s Lea Michele defended by former on-screen boyfriend Dean Geyer


Australian actor Dean Geyer has defended Lea Michele amid the growing backlash against her, after playing her boyfriend on Glee’s fourth season in 2012.

The 34-year-old is the first former co-star of Lea’s to publicly support her as she faces multiple accusations of on-set bullying.

Dean said on Thursday the 33-year-old actress was the ‘most welcoming’ cast member when he joined the hit Fox show, and that he never witnessed anybody being uncomfortable around her.

His comments come after Heather Morris said Lea was ‘very unpleasant’ to work with on Glee, and Samantha Ware claimed she had made her life ‘a living hell’.   

Support: Actor Dean Geyer has defended Lea Michele amid the growing backlash against her, after playing her boyfriend on Glee’s fourth season. Pictured: Dean and Lea filming in 2012 

When asked about working alongside Lea, Dean had nothing but nice things to say. He played Brody Weston, her character Rachel Berry’s boyfriend for 14 episodes.

‘Lea is still one of my favourite co-stars that I have had the pleasure of working with. She is extremely hard working and super fun to be around. Her work ethic is so strong it forces you to always be on top of your game, and thats something I looked forward to everyday on set. I definitely learned a lot,’ said Dean on Thursday.

‘When jumping onto a hugely successful and established show like Glee, I went into it expecting to be known as the “new guy” for at least a month, but that wasn’t the case at all. Almost immediately I felt welcomed, and to be totally honest, out of everyone, Lea was the most friendly to me.’ 

''I can only speak of my own experience': The told Daily Mail Australia on Thursday that the actress, 33, was the 'most welcoming' cast member when he joined the hit show, and that he never witnessed anybody display 'any signs of discomfort' around her on set

‘I can only speak of my own experience’: The 34-year-old told Daily Mail Australia on Thursday that the actress, 33, was the ‘most welcoming’ cast member when he joined the hit show, and that he never witnessed anybody display ‘any signs of discomfort’ around her on set

Memories: 'Lea is still one of my favourite co-stars that I have had the pleasure of working with. She is extremely hard working and super fun to be around,' praised Dean. Pictured in 2012

Memories: ‘Lea is still one of my favourite co-stars that I have had the pleasure of working with. She is extremely hard working and super fun to be around,’ praised Dean. Pictured in 2012

'If I'm basing my opinion off my season, there definitely shouldn't be a reason for a backlash': Dean went on to say that he doesn't agree with the backlash against her. Pictured in 2012

‘If I’m basing my opinion off my season, there definitely shouldn’t be a reason for a backlash’: Dean went on to say that he doesn’t agree with the backlash against her. Pictured in 2012

Dean went on to say that he doesn’t agree with the current backlash against her.  

‘I can only speak for myself and my own experience, but from what I saw during my time on set, there was nothing but professionalism and a genuine sense of community amongst the cast and crew,’ he continued. 

‘No one showed any signs of discomfort while Lea was on set. If I’m basing my opinion off my season, there definitely shouldn’t be a reason for a backlash.’

The former Australian Idol star, who recently released new music iTunes and Spotify, concluded by saying he’s ‘grateful for the experience and opportunity to be involved with such an iconic show’ alongside Lea and the rest of the cast.

'Very unpleasant': On Wednesday, Glee's Heather Morris (pictured) became the latest person to slam Lea's behaviour on set of the show, along with other stars and members of crew

‘Very unpleasant’: On Wednesday, Glee’s Heather Morris (pictured) became the latest person to slam Lea’s behaviour on set of the show, along with other stars and members of crew 

Statement: Heather, who played Brittany S. Pierce on Glee, tweeted that Lea 'should be called out' for the way she 'treated others with disrespect' for so long

Statement: Heather, who played Brittany S. Pierce on Glee, tweeted that Lea ‘should be called out’ for the way she ‘treated others with disrespect’ for so long

On Wednesday, Heather Morris, who played Brittany S. Pierce on Glee, became the latest person to slam Lea’s behaviour on set of the show, along with other stars and members of crew. The backlash started earlier this week after Samantha Ware tweeted that Lea made her life a ‘living hell’ filming Glee in 2015. 

Heather tweeted: ‘Let me be very clear, Hate is a disease in America that we are trying to cure, so I would never wish for hate to be spread to anyone else. With that said, was she unpleasant to work with? Very much so; for Lea to treat others with the disrespect that she did for as long as she did, I believe she SHOULD be called out.

‘And yet, it’s also on us because to allow it to go on for so long without speaking out is something else we’re learning along with the rest of society. But, at the current moment its implied that she is a racist and although I cannot comment on her beliefs, I think we’re assuming, and you know what happens when we all assume…’  

Speaking out: The backlash started earlier this week after Samantha Ware (pictured), who played Jane Hayward on Glee in 2015, tweeted that Lea made her life a 'living hell' on set

Speaking out: The backlash started earlier this week after Samantha Ware (pictured), who played Jane Hayward on Glee in 2015, tweeted that Lea made her life a ‘living hell’ on set

Apology: In response to Samantha's comments, Lea apologised for her behaviour on Wednesday, and said she has 'never judged others by their background or colour of their skin', but insisted she will learn from the mistakes she has made in the past

Apology: In response to Samantha’s comments, Lea apologised for her behaviour on Wednesday, and said she has ‘never judged others by their background or colour of their skin’, but insisted she will learn from the mistakes she has made in the past 

The bullying allegations came to light after Lea took to social media last Friday to pay tribute to George Floyd, writing: ‘George Floyd did not deserve this. This was not an isolated incident and it must end.’

Samantha Ware, who played Jane Hayward on the show’s sixth season in 2015, quoted Lea’s tweet several days later, writing: ‘Remember when you made my first television gig a living hell?!?! Cause I’ll never forget. I believe you told everyone that if you had the opportunity you would ‘s*** in my wig!’ amongst other traumatic microaggressions that made me question a career in Hollywood.’

In response, Lea apologised for her behaviour on Wednesday, and said she has ‘never judged others by their background or colour of their skin’, but insisted she will learn from the mistakes she has made so she ‘can be a real role model for my child’ when she gives birth in a couple of months. 

Other stars, including Glee’s Amber Riley, have also spoken out against Lea, who was recently dropped by the company Hello Fresh over the controversy. 

All the stars that have spoken out against Lea Michele

Samantha Ware

Glee actress Samantha re-ignited rumors of Lea Michele’s alleged bad behavior on-set, when she responded to Michele’s post regarding the death of George Floyd earlier this week. Ware, 33, said: ‘Remember when you made my first television gig a living hell?!?!… ‘Cause I’ll never forget… I believe you told everyone that if you had the opportunity you would ‘s*** in my wig!’ amongst other traumatic microaggressions that made me question a career in Hollywood.’ 

Kicking off: Samantha Ware made claims about Lea Michele earlier this week.

Kicking off: Samantha Ware made claims about Lea Michele earlier this week. 

Alex Newell

Alex – who starred as Unique Adams on series for four seasons – promptly aired his feelings on Twitter. ‘We ain’t got not a damn thing to lie about 6 years later!’ he replied to one fan who suggested they were making false accusations about Michele’s behavior.

Dabier Snell

Actor Dabier Snell, who appeared in one episode of Glee, claimed he wasn’t allowed to sit with Michele on set, saying: ‘GIRL YOU WOULDNT LET ME SIT AT THE TABLE WITH THE OTHER CAST MEMBERS CAUSE ‘I DIDNT BELONG THERE’ F–K YOU LEA,’

Amber Riley 

Riley, who played Mercedes Jones in the through all six seasons, shared two GIFs of herself following the allegations, one raising her hand, while the other sipping tea. The response caused a stir among fans who saw it as a subtle way of the actress chiming in.

Bad memories: Lea on Glee with Chris Colfer and Heather Morris

Bad memories: Lea on Glee with Chris Colfer and Heather Morris

Heather Morris

Morris, 33, who played cheerleader Brittany S. Pierce on the Ryan Murphy show, claims Michele was ‘very’ unpleasant to work with, saying: ”Was she unpleasant to work with? Very much so; for Lea to treat others with the disrespect that she did for as long as she did, I believe she SHOULD be called out.’

Melissa Benoist

Supergirl star Melissa Benoist, who appeared on Glee with Lea Michele, liked a series of posts describing star’s bullying and abusive behavior toward castmates. Benoist appeared on Glee’s fourth season playing a character named Marley Rose. She sang a duet with Michele on the series. She also pressed the heart button on tweets from Glee’s Alex Newell and Amber Riley that essentially endorsed the spirit of Ware’s sentiments. 

RHONY’s Aviva Drescher

Even Real Housewives of New York star Aviva Drescher had a story to tell, commenting: ‘You were once very unkind to me so I am not surprised by your behavior. You shouldn’t judge others before looking in the mirror.’ Michele made disparaging remarks about Drescher during an episode of Andy Cohen’s Watch What Happens Live. 

Awkward: Lea slated Aviva on a 2014 appearance on Watch What Happens Live!

Awkward: Lea slated Aviva on a 2014 appearance on Watch What Happens Live!

Abigail Breslin

Scream Queens actress Breslin, 24, was another former co-star who was caught ‘liking’ a smattering of tweets about the controversy. Including one that read: “not everyone agreeing that something felt off about Lea Michele… where have y’all been i’ve BEEN saying this FOR YEARS??? i thought i was alone.’

Yvette Nicole Brown

Actress Yvette Nicole Brown also gave her support to Ware. ‘I felt every one of those capital letters,’ the Community actress tweeted ‘EVERY person on a set matters. EVERY person on a set deserves respect. And it is the RESPONSIBILITY of every series regular to make EVERY person who visits their home feel welcome. This dismissive attitude is what’s wrong in Hollywood AND the world.’

Marcel Spears 

The Mayor actor reacted to an array of replies to Ware’s initial tweet, including one directly asking Yvette Nicole Brown: ‘I assume u feel the same since u worked with her?’

Gerard Canonico

Broadway actor Gerard Canonico, 30, was an understudy in the original Broadway cast of Spring Awakening starring Michele and her BFF Jonathan Groff. ‘You were nothing but a nightmare to me and fellow understudy cast members. You made us feel like we didn’t belong there,’ Canonico wrote in a comment on her Instagram apology, which he had re-posted after claiming it had initially been deleted.

Under fire: Lea Michele in April 2019

Under fire: Lea Michele in April 2019

 

 

My Kitchen Rules star Zana Pali has already lost 10 kilos after giving birth to a baby boy last week


My Kitchen Rules star Zana Pali reveals she has already lost 10kg after giving birth to a baby boy last week by cutting out all carbohydrates, processed foods and refined sugars

She welcomed her second child – a baby boy Romeo –  with husband Gianni Romano last week.

And on Wednesday, My Kitchen Rules star Zana Pali revealed she has already lost 10kg since giving birth.

Showcasing her post-pregnancy figure on her Instagram stories, the 28-year-old brunette said she was on a mission to get her physique back.

One hot mama! Zana Pali (pictured) has lost a whopping 10 kilos after welcoming her second child, baby Romeo last week. Pictured on June 3rd

She’s sizzling! My Kitchen Rules star Zana Pali has revealed she has lost a whopping 10 kilos after giving birth to her second child, baby Romeo last week. (Pictured left on April 22 and on June 3, right)

‘7 days postpartum going for my first walk in three months,’ she wrote, as she posed side on in a grey sports bra and skintight black leggings.

Speaking to Daily Mail Australia on Thursday, Zana explained she was on a strict diet and was determined to lose another 10kg in the next two weeks.

She has cut out all carbohydrates, processed foods and refined sugars.  

'7 days postpartum going for my first walk in three months,' she wrote as she flaunted her body in a grey sports bra and skin-tight black leggings

‘7 days postpartum going for my first walk in three months,’ she wrote as she flaunted her body in a grey sports bra and skin-tight black leggings

Zana said she was eating white meats, salads, berries and snacking on carrots to keep up her nutrition. 

‘Just remember not everybody is the same, and everyone does lose weight differently,’ she told her followers. 

She is also doing light exercises and going for walks around her neighbourhood.

While it’s not advised to be on strict low-carb diet while breastfeeding, extra fruits or servings of roasted vegetables can be a healthy way to get the much-need carbs. 

Zana told her followers that she was hoping to lose another 10 kilos by making healthier food choices, and snacking on carrots to get her body back

'Just remember not everybody is the same, and everyone does lose weight differently,' she told her followers

Healthy choices: Speaking to Daily Mail Australia on Thursday, Zana revealed she was on a strict diet and is determined to to lose another 10 kilos within the next two weeks

The former reality star went on to say that it took her three months to feel ‘normal’ and lose the extra weight she gained while pregnant with her firstborn Leonardo in 2018.

‘I lost 34 kilos after Leo, I was huge!’ she said.  

On Tuesday, Zana, who was known as the glitzy fashion-loving lawyer on the cooking show back in 2016, shared a series of photos of the growing happy family. 

Bundle! On Tuesday, Zana, who was known as the glitzy fashion-loving lawyer on the cooking show back in 2016, shared a series of photos alongside her husband Gianni Romano (L) and their eldest son Leo, one

Bundle! On Tuesday, Zana, who was known as the glitzy fashion-loving lawyer on the cooking show back in 2016, shared a series of photos alongside her husband Gianni Romano (L) and their eldest son Leo, one

In one, she was seen posing next to a stunning baby-themed setting alongside Gianni and their eldest son Leo, one.

Zana has been open about the struggles of her second pregnancy, with trolls messaging her about her bump size and parenting choices.    

The expectant mother previously told Daily Mail Australia in February that she was ‘abused’ for having a small bump.

‘I’ve received messages on Instagram from other mothers who have said things such as ”your baby cannot possibly be healthy with how small your bump is”,’ Zana said. 

Family! Zana has been open about the struggles of her second pregnancy, with trolls messaging her about her bump size and parenting choices

Family! Zana has been open about the struggles of her second pregnancy, with trolls messaging her about her bump size and parenting choices 

Jackie ‘O’ Henderson BLASTS Lea Michele’s apology to her Glee co-star


Glee star Lea Michele has faced multiple accusations of on-set bullying following claims she made a black female co-star’s life ‘a living hell’.

After the 33-year-old actress shared a Twitter post expressing solidarity with George Floyd protesters on Friday, Samantha Ware publicly accused her of threatening to defecate in her wig and subjecting her to ‘other traumatic microaggressions’.

Lea has since apologised for her past behaviour, but Sydney radio hosts Jackie ‘O’ Henderson and Kyle Sandilands – who had a bad experience with the Broadway star several years ago – said on Thursday it wasn’t good enough. 

Jackie said Lea’s apology had ‘missed the mark’ because she attempted to shift the blame onto her colleagues for ‘perceiving’ her words and actions the wrong way. 

‘It missed the mark’: Sydney radio host Jackie ‘O’ Henderson (pictured) has blasted Lea Michele’s apology to her Glee co-star Samantha Ware

The saga began when Lea tweeted in support of the Black Lives Matter movement, and Samantha called her out, asking: ‘Remember when you made my first television gig a living hell?

‘Cause I’ll never forget… I believe you told everyone that if you had the opportunity you would “s**t in my wig!” amongst other traumatic microaggressions that made me question a career in Hollywood.’

Several A-list stars, including Ariana Grande and Keke Palmer, unfollowed Lea and she was immediately dropped as a Hello Fresh spokesperson, which led Lea to issue an apology.

Allegations: Glee star Lea Michele (pictured) has faced multiple accusations of on-set bullying following claims she made a black female co-star's life 'a living hell'. Pictured as Rachel Berry

Allegations: Glee star Lea Michele (pictured) has faced multiple accusations of on-set bullying following claims she made a black female co-star’s life ‘a living hell’. Pictured as Rachel Berry

Claims: After the 33-year-old actress shared a Twitter post expressing solidarity with George Floyd protesters on Friday, Samantha Ware (pictured) publicly accused her of threatening to defecate in her wig and subjecting her to 'other traumatic microaggressions'

Claims: After the 33-year-old actress shared a Twitter post expressing solidarity with George Floyd protesters on Friday, Samantha Ware (pictured) publicly accused her of threatening to defecate in her wig and subjecting her to ‘other traumatic microaggressions’ 

'Remember when you made my first television gig a living hell?' Samantha tweeted. 'Cause I'll never forget... I believe you told everyone that if you had the opportunity you would "s**t in my wig!" amongst other traumatic microaggressions that made me question a career in Hollywood'

‘Remember when you made my first television gig a living hell?’ Samantha tweeted. ‘Cause I’ll never forget… I believe you told everyone that if you had the opportunity you would “s**t in my wig!” amongst other traumatic microaggressions that made me question a career in Hollywood’

Lea admitted her ‘privileged position and immaturity’ had contributed to causing pain to her former co-star, 28, in a statement posted to Instagram on Wednesday.

She said: ‘When I tweeted the other day, it was meant to be a show of support for our friends and neighbors and communities of color during this really difficult time. 

‘But the responses I received to what I posted have made me also focus on how my own behavior towards fellow cast members was perceived by them. 

‘While I don’t remember ever making this specific statement [about the wig] and I have never judged others by their background or color of their skin, that’s not really the point. What matters is that I clearly acted in ways which hurt other people.’ 

Shock: Several A-list stars, including Ariana Grande and Keke Palmer, unfollowed Lea and she was immediately dropped as a Hello Fresh spokesperson, which led Lea to issue an apology

Shock: Several A-list stars, including Ariana Grande and Keke Palmer, unfollowed Lea and she was immediately dropped as a Hello Fresh spokesperson, which led Lea to issue an apology

Apology: Lea admitted her 'privileged position and immaturity' had contributed to causing pain to her former co-star, 28, in a statement posted to Instagram on Wednesday

Apology: Lea admitted her ‘privileged position and immaturity’ had contributed to causing pain to her former co-star, 28, in a statement posted to Instagram on Wednesday

Based on the public’s response, Jackie suggested it was ‘actually worse’ that Lea couldn’t remember her ‘s**ting in the wig’ threat because that’s a ‘really nasty thing to say’.

She also pointed out Lea had used the word ‘perceived’ several times in her apology. 

‘Lea has obviously written an apology on her Instagram but it missed the mark, I think. Most of the comments are like, “Are you kidding? This is the worst apology ever,”‘ Jackie said. 

Wrong answer: Based on the public's response, Jackie suggested it was 'actually worse' that Lea (pictured in March 2018) couldn't remember her 's**ting in the wig' threat because that's a 'really nasty thing to say'

Wrong answer: Based on the public’s response, Jackie suggested it was ‘actually worse’ that Lea (pictured in March 2018) couldn’t remember her ‘s**ting in the wig’ threat because that’s a ‘really nasty thing to say’

She added: That’s the part where everyone said, “What do you mean perceived by them? You weren’t in the wrong and they were just perceiving you wrong?” That’s where a lot of people have taken issue.’

Kyle agreed with the public outrage, saying that ‘you misunderstood me’ doesn’t constitute a real apology.

Jackie replied: ‘When you apologise and say, “I’m sorry you took it that way,” that’s not saying sorry. That’s saying you’re the one that has the issue, not me.’ 

'This is the worst apology ever': She also pointed out Lea had used the word 'perceived' several times in her apology - which pushed the blame onto her co-stars for being offended

‘This is the worst apology ever’: She also pointed out Lea had used the word ‘perceived’ several times in her apology – which pushed the blame onto her co-stars for being offended

Jackie has her own beef with Lea after she asked the singer a question during an interview years ago that angered her fiercely loyal fanbase. 

The 45-year-old had asked Lea about a rumour the stars of Glee were contracted to do six seasons without a pay rise, even if the show went on to become a success.

Lea’s reaction, Jackie said, was ‘totally unwarranted’. 

They have history: Jackie has her own beef with Lea after she asked the singer a question during an interview years ago that angered her fiercely loyal fanbase

They have history: Jackie has her own beef with Lea after she asked the singer a question during an interview years ago that angered her fiercely loyal fanbase

‘Oh god, the frickin’ backlash I got,’ Jackie recalled on air in 2018. ‘She made my life hell!’ 

‘She pretty much banned her agent, who looked after heaps of celebrities, we got blacklisted from everyone because she was so offended at a question that was in the news already!’ she added.

‘Who cares about that kid — can’t stand that girl,’ Kyle responded.   

Diva: Jackie (pictured with co-host Kyle Sandilands) had asked Lea about a rumour the stars of Glee were contracted to do six seasons without a pay rise, even if the show went on to become a success. Lea was so angry she told her agent to blacklist The Kyle and Jackie O Show

Diva: Jackie (pictured with co-host Kyle Sandilands) had asked Lea about a rumour the stars of Glee were contracted to do six seasons without a pay rise, even if the show went on to become a success. Lea was so angry she told her agent to blacklist The Kyle and Jackie O Show

All the stars that have spoken out against Lea Michele

Samantha Ware

Glee actress Samantha re-ignited rumors of Lea Michele’s alleged bad behavior on-set, when she responded to Michele’s post regarding the death of George Floyd earlier this week. Ware, 33, said: ‘Remember when you made my first television gig a living hell?!?!… ‘Cause I’ll never forget… I believe you told everyone that if you had the opportunity you would ‘s*** in my wig!’ amongst other traumatic microaggressions that made me question a career in Hollywood.’ 

Kicking off: Samantha Ware made claims about Lea Michele earlier this week.

Kicking off: Samantha Ware made claims about Lea Michele earlier this week. 

Alex Newell

Alex – who starred as Unique Adams on series for four seasons – promptly aired his feelings on Twitter. ‘We ain’t got not a damn thing to lie about 6 years later!’ he replied to one fan who suggested they were making false accusations about Michele’s behavior.

Dabier Snell

Actor Dabier Snell, who appeared in one episode of Glee, claimed he wasn’t allowed to sit with Michele on set, saying: ‘GIRL YOU WOULDNT LET ME SIT AT THE TABLE WITH THE OTHER CAST MEMBERS CAUSE ‘I DIDNT BELONG THERE’ F–K YOU LEA,’

Amber Riley 

Riley, who played Mercedes Jones in the through all six seasons, shared two GIFs of herself following the allegations, one raising her hand, while the other sipping tea. The response caused a stir among fans who saw it as a subtle way of the actress chiming in.

Bad memories: Lea on Glee with Chris Colfer and Heather Morris

Bad memories: Lea on Glee with Chris Colfer and Heather Morris

Heather Morris

Morris, 33, who played cheerleader Brittany S. Pierce on the Ryan Murphy show, claims Michele was ‘very’ unpleasant to work with, saying: ”Was she unpleasant to work with? Very much so; for Lea to treat others with the disrespect that she did for as long as she did, I believe she SHOULD be called out.’

Melissa Benoist

Supergirl star Melissa Benoist, who appeared on Glee with Lea Michele, liked a series of posts describing star’s bullying and abusive behavior toward castmates. Benoist appeared on Glee’s fourth season playing a character named Marley Rose. She sang a duet with Michele on the series. She also pressed the heart button on tweets from Glee’s Alex Newell and Amber Riley that essentially endorsed the spirit of Ware’s sentiments. 

RHONY’s Aviva Drescher

Even Real Housewives of New York star Aviva Drescher had a story to tell, commenting: ‘You were once very unkind to me so I am not surprised by your behavior. You shouldn’t judge others before looking in the mirror.’ Michele made disparaging remarks about Drescher during an episode of Andy Cohen’s Watch What Happens Live. 

Awkward: Lea slated Aviva on a 2014 appearance on Watch What Happens Live!

Awkward: Lea slated Aviva on a 2014 appearance on Watch What Happens Live!

Abigail Breslin

Scream Queens actress Breslin, 24, was another former co-star who was caught ‘liking’ a smattering of tweets about the controversy. Including one that read: “not everyone agreeing that something felt off about Lea Michele… where have y’all been i’ve BEEN saying this FOR YEARS??? i thought i was alone.’

Yvette Nicole Brown

Actress Yvette Nicole Brown also gave her support to Ware. ‘I felt every one of those capital letters,’ the Community actress tweeted ‘EVERY person on a set matters. EVERY person on a set deserves respect. And it is the RESPONSIBILITY of every series regular to make EVERY person who visits their home feel welcome. This dismissive attitude is what’s wrong in Hollywood AND the world.’

Marcel Spears 

The Mayor actor reacted to an array of replies to Ware’s initial tweet, including one directly asking Yvette Nicole Brown: ‘I assume u feel the same since u worked with her?’

Gerard Canonico

Broadway actor Gerard Canonico, 30, was an understudy in the original Broadway cast of Spring Awakening starring Michele and her BFF Jonathan Groff. ‘You were nothing but a nightmare to me and fellow understudy cast members. You made us feel like we didn’t belong there,’ Canonico wrote in a comment on her Instagram apology, which he had re-posted after claiming it had initially been deleted.

Under fire: Lea Michele in April 2019

Under fire: Lea Michele in April 2019

 

 

Severely ill coronavirus patients treated with plasma from survivors recovered FIVE days faster


Convalescent plasma therapy did not significantly improve the conditions of patients with life-threatening coronavirus, a new study suggests.

Among patients with ‘life-threatening’ cases, meaning in organ failure or needing to be placed on ventilators, more patients recovered who didn’t receive the treatment than those who did.

Researchers, from the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, also found no significant differences in mortality rates or discharge rates.

However, there was some good news.

Over 28 days, ‘severely ill’ patients, meaning those who were sick but not ill enough to be placed in the ICU, recovered roughly five days faster with plasma treatment and 91 percent recovered compared to 68 percent of the control group   

‘Severely ill’ patients recovered roughly five days faster with plasma treatment and 91% recovered compared to 68% of the control group (left) but, among ‘life-threatening’ patients, only 20.7% of those who received plasma recovered in comparison with 24.1% of those who didn’t (right)

in Seattle, Washington

Convalescent plasma therapy is when the liquid portion of blood is taken from a recovered coronavirus patient, which is transferred into a sick patient in hopes they will develop the antibodies needed to fight off the infection. Pictured: Melissa Cruz, donates COVID-19 convalescent plasma at Bloodworks Northwest in Seattle, Washington, April 17

Researchers said there was no significant differences among mortality rates or time from treatment to discharge, Pictured: A phlebotomist inserts an IV line as Mckinley Edelman, 26, a recovered COVID-19 patient, donates plasma to MedStar Georgetown University Hospital in Dulles, Virginia, April 22

Researchers said there was no significant differences among mortality rates or time from treatment to discharge, Pictured: A phlebotomist inserts an IV line as Mckinley Edelman, 26, a recovered COVID-19 patient, donates plasma to MedStar Georgetown University Hospital in Dulles, Virginia, April 22

Convalescent plasma therapy is an experimental treatment in which plasma from a recovered COVID-19 patient is used on an infected patient in critical condition.

The hope is that the antibodies and immunity in the blood of a healthy person will be transferred to a sick person.

From this, the infected person will then develop the antibodies needed to fight off the coronavirus.

The treatment was first used during the Spanish Flu pandemic of 1918, a situation not far removed from the coronavirus pandemic.

For the study, published in JAMA, the team looked at 101 patients hospitalized in  seven medical centers in Wuhan – where the virus originated – from February 14 to April 1.

Half of the patients were in severe respiratory distress and/or suffering from hypoxemia, which is when there are low levels of oxygen in the blood.

The other half were in life-threatening conditions, such as experiencing organ failure or requiring mechanical ventilation. 

Within 28 days, conditions improved among 51.9 percent of all the convalescent plasma group and 43.1 percent of all the control group – not even a 10 percent difference. 

There were some encouraging results among patients who were ‘severely ill’ but not sick enough to be in ICUs. 

They recovered roughly five days faster if they got the plasma treatment, and 91 percent of them improved within 28 days of starting treatment compared to 68 percent of the control group. 

Meanwhile, in the ‘life-threatening disease’ group, only 20.7 percent of those who received plasma recovered in comparison with 24.1 percent of those who didn’t.

The researchers also said there was no significance among mortality rates or time from treatment to discharge.

By day 28, 15.7 percent of the plasma group and 24 percent of  the group had passed away while 51 percent of plasma patients and 36 percent of control patients were discharged. 

‘Among patients with severe or life-threatening COVID-19, convalescent plasma therapy added to standard treatment, compared with standard treatment alone, did not result in a statistically significant improvement in time to clinical improvement within 28 days,’ the authors wrote.

They noted that the trial was ended early when they failed to recruit 200 patients. 

‘Interpretation is limited by early termination of the trial, which may have been underpowered to detect a clinically important difference,’ the wrote. 

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the use of convalescent plasma for treatment last month.

‘Prior experience with respiratory viruses and limited data that have emerged from China suggest that convalescent plasma has the potential to lessen the severity or shorten the length of illness caused by COVID-19,’ the agency said in a statement on April 16.

However, the FDA added it must be given on case-by-case basis, and patients who receive it must be experiencing conditions such as respiratory failure or multiple organ failure. 

People can donate plasma more than once, but have to wait several weeks after donating. 

In the US, there are more than 1.8 million confirmed cases of the virus and more than 106,000 deaths. 

Capitol Police kneel before protesters in DC as George Floyd protests continue nationwide


The ninth night of protests over the death of George Floyd came to a relatively peaceful end on Wednesday as crowds in several cities dispersed without aggressive intervention from police enforcing curfews.

In Atlanta, streets that were filled with hundreds of protesters during the day emptied out when a 9pm curfew went into effect. 

Similar scenes unfolded in Philadelphia, where the 7pm curfew was accompanied by a sudden rain shower that soaked protesters on their way home.  

In Washington, DC, hundreds of people remained on the streets as an 11pm curfew approached and a feeling of anxiety hung in the air between the crowds and a line of troops watching over them in riot gear.  

Tensions were higher in New York City, however, as several people were taken into custody and at least one police officer was injured when a scuffle broke out in Brooklyn, where hundreds of people were marching to Cadman Plaza. 

But thus far there has been a marked quiet compared with the unrest of the past few nights, which included fires and shootings in some cities while police resorted to forceful tactics including tear gas, pepper spray and rubber bullets to break up crowds.  

WASHINGTON DC: Protesters hold up their phones during a demonstration as a city-wide 11pm curfew approached

NEW YORK: Scuffles broke out between police and protesters marching in Brooklyn on Wednesday night

NEW YORK: Scuffles broke out between police and protesters marching in Brooklyn on Wednesday night

ATLANTA: A woman who identified herself as Bork is helped to her feet by police officers after she agreed to stop blocking a street during a protest on Wednesday night after a city-wide curfew went into effect in Atlanta

ATLANTA: A woman who identified herself as Bork is helped to her feet by police officers after she agreed to stop blocking a street during a protest on Wednesday night after a city-wide curfew went into effect in Atlanta

PHILADELPHIA: Rain showers moved through Philadelphia on Wednesday night, causing protest crowds to disperse

PHILADELPHIA: Rain showers moved through Philadelphia on Wednesday night, causing protest crowds to disperse

LOS ANGELES: Demonstrators crowd a plaza in Los Angeles on Wednesday evening after a day of peaceful protests

LOS ANGELES: Demonstrators crowd a plaza in Los Angeles on Wednesday evening after a day of peaceful protests

The US has been rocked by over a week of tumult since George Floyd, a black man, was killed in Minneapolis after white police officer Derek Chauvin pinned him to the ground by kneeling on his neck on Memorial Day. 

Floyd, who was in handcuffs at the time, died after Chauvin ignored bystander shouts to get off him and Floyd’s cries that he couldn’t breathe. 

His death, captured on citizen video, has sparked days of protests in Minneapolis that quickly spread to cities across America.  

Charges against Chauvin were upgraded to second-degree murder on Wednesday, and the three other officers at the scene were newly charged with aiding and abetting murder.

However, the news seemed to do little to quell the protests and unrest, which continued for a ninth straight day in dozens of cities including New York City, Los Angeles, Chicago, Boston and Philadelphia. 

WASHINGTON DC: US Capitol police kneel as demonstrators protest the death of George Floyd at the Capitol on Wednesday after the protesters demanded they take a knee

WASHINGTON DC: US Capitol police kneel as demonstrators protest the death of George Floyd at the Capitol on Wednesday after the protesters demanded they take a knee

NEW YORK: Hundreds joined the march near Prospect Park in the Brooklyn borough of New York on Wednesday

NEW YORK: Hundreds joined the march near Prospect Park in the Brooklyn borough of New York on Wednesday 

BOSTON: People take part in a rally following the death in Minneapolis police custody of George Floyd, on Wednesday

BOSTON: People take part in a rally following the death in Minneapolis police custody of George Floyd, on Wednesday

CHICAGO: Demonstrators in the Logan Square neighborhood of Chicago also marched on Wednesday

CHICAGO: Demonstrators in the Logan Square neighborhood of Chicago also marched on Wednesday

LOS ANGELES: Protesters in Los Angeles pass through police lines after negotiating during a demonstration on Wednesday

LOS ANGELES: Protesters in Los Angeles pass through police lines after negotiating during a demonstration on Wednesday

SEATTLE: Hundreds of people marched through Seattle's Capitol Hill neighborhood on their way to City Hall on Wednesday

SEATTLE: Hundreds of people marched through Seattle’s Capitol Hill neighborhood on their way to City Hall on Wednesday

In Washington DC, some Capitol Police in charge of protecting Congress took a knee as protesters shouted slogans, similar to other scenes that have played out across the nation.

While many view the gesture as an act of solidarity with peaceful protests, as police join in condemning Floyd’s in-custody death, others have criticized cops who participate as bowing down before protesters. 

President Donald Trump waded into the debate on Wednesday morning for the first time, retweeting a message that said New York City police were being forced to ‘bend a knee to terrorists’.  

Protesters in DC sent a strong message to police hours later as they lay face-down in front of the Capitol in silence.

Organizers asked them to stay down and stay quiet for the about same amount of time Chauvin knelt on Floyd’s neck. 

In the afternoon, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi emerged from the Capitol building to greet and mingle with the protesters. 

At one point the crowd knelt together as they sang ‘Amazing Grace’ and chanted: ‘We are not going anywhere.’ 

Meanwhile law enforcement officers in riot gear stood watch over the crowd, which stretched down 16th Street near the White House.

Mayor Muriel Bowser moved the citywide curfew back from 7pm to 11pm curfew after a peaceful night of protests on Tuesday.  

WASHINGTON DC: Demonstrators protest the death of George Floyd as they gather Wednesday on Capitol Hill

WASHINGTON DC: Demonstrators protest the death of George Floyd as they gather Wednesday on Capitol Hill

WASHINGTON DC: A protester demonstrating against the death of George Floyd talks to Capitol Police on the East Front of the US Capitol on Wednesday

WASHINGTON DC: A protester demonstrating against the death of George Floyd talks to Capitol Police on the East Front of the US Capitol on Wednesday

WASHINGTON DC: Demonstrators participate in a Black Lives Matter rally as protests continue over the death in Minneapolis police custody of George Floyd, outside the US Capitol on Wednesday

WASHINGTON DC: Demonstrators participate in a Black Lives Matter rally as protests continue over the death in Minneapolis police custody of George Floyd, outside the US Capitol on Wednesday

WASHINGTON DC:Demonstrators on the East side of the US Capitol in protest the death of George Floyd on Wednesday

WASHINGTON DC:Demonstrators on the East side of the US Capitol in protest the death of George Floyd on Wednesday

WASHINGTON DC: Police gather as the first line to keep demonstrators away from Lafayette Square near the White House

WASHINGTON DC: Police gather as the first line to keep demonstrators away from Lafayette Square near the White House

In New York City, the scene of massive protests as well as shocking looting after dark in recent days, the streets were calmed by afternoon rain showers.

However, as the weather cleared by 4pm, several large groups began gathering in Washington Square Park and elsewhere.

One group marched up 5th Avenue toward Central Park.

Storefronts in New York were fortified at new levels of security in fears of violence breaking out after dark, with companies adding razorwire and guard dogs to deter looting. 

A large protest march also occurred in the Brooklyn neighborhood of Bed-Stuy. Some business owners in the neighborhood prepared by putting signs saying ‘black owned’ in their storefront windows. 

Meanwhile, city officials expressed hope that an earlier curfew and refined police tactics will bring the city closer to restoring order after days of unrest. 

‘Last night we took a step forward in moving out of this difficult period we’ve had the last few days and moving to a better time,’ Mayor Bill de Blasio said.

Gov Andrew Cuomo, who was critical of the police response on prior nights, said the city Tuesday ‘was much, much better than the night before’.

‘It worked. We got results,’ Cuomo said. ‘Let’s just remember what we did last night and keep that going.’

De Blasio rejected President Trump’s urging and Cuomo’s offer to send in the National Guard to quell the unrest, saying the NYPD was best suited for the task and fearing out-of-town Guardsmen unfamiliar with city dynamics could spark confrontations.

Trump warned that if the city didn’t maintain order, he would take the matter into his own hands, though he didn’t say what action he might take.

NEW YORK: In Brooklyn, protesters gathered in Grand Army Plaza on Wednesday afternoon after the skies cleared

NEW YORK: In Brooklyn, protesters gathered in Grand Army Plaza on Wednesday afternoon after the skies cleared

NEW YORK: A demonstrator attends a protest against the death in Minneapolis police custody of George Floyd in Brooklyn

NEW YORK: A demonstrator attends a protest against the death in Minneapolis police custody of George Floyd in Brooklyn

NEW YORK: In Manhattan, a group also gathered outside of the Stonewall Inn to protest the death of George Floyd

NEW YORK: In Manhattan, a group also gathered outside of the Stonewall Inn to protest the death of George Floyd

NEW YORK: People in Manhattan rally against the death in Minneapolis police custody of George Floyd on Wednesday

NEW YORK: People in Manhattan rally against the death in Minneapolis police custody of George Floyd on Wednesday

NEW YORK: People rally against the death in Minneapolis police custody of George Floyd, in Manhattan

NEW YORK: People rally against the death in Minneapolis police custody of George Floyd, in Manhattan

In Los Angeles, protesters gathered in Hollywood on Wednesday to voice their discontent.

Hundreds appeared to be peacefully marching near La Cienega Boulevard and Santa Monica Boulevard. 

The demonstrators blocked traffic at the intersection just before 1pm and each got down on one knee and took a moment of silence. 

Los Angeles County has ordered another overnight curfew, but it will be four hours shorter.

The curfew will begin at 9pm Wednesday and end at 5am Thursday. Previous curfews ran from 6pm to 6am.

A county statement says officials are assessing public safety needs on a daily basis.

A few municipalities in the sprawling county continue to have stricter curfews. Huge demonstrations in Los Angeles on Tuesday were peaceful, and subsequent arrests were only for curfew violations.

On Wednesday the Los Angeles County District Attorney’s Office announced that 60 people were facing charges for crimes during protests in the city over the past week.

Most of the charges were for looting, but others include assault and/or battery of a peace officer, robbery, burglary and receiving stolen property. 

The district attorney’s office said it expected more charges to be brought later this week.  

About 2,700 people were arrested by the Los Angeles Police Department between Friday and Monday, Officer Rosario Cervantes told CNN. 

It’s unclear how many of those arrests were linked to protests.  

LOS ANGELES: Protesters gather at the intersection of La Cienega Boulevard and Santa Monica Boulevard as they prepare to march during a demonstration in West Hollywood

LOS ANGELES: Protesters gather at the intersection of La Cienega Boulevard and Santa Monica Boulevard as they prepare to march during a demonstration in West Hollywood

LOS ANGELES: People attend a protest against the death in Minneapolis police custody of George Floyd, in Hollywood

LOS ANGELES: People attend a protest against the death in Minneapolis police custody of George Floyd, in Hollywood

LOS ANGELES: California National Guard members stand guard as protesters walk past them at the Hollywood Walk of Fame

LOS ANGELES: California National Guard members stand guard as protesters walk past them at the Hollywood Walk of Fame

LOS ANGELES: People take a knee as they attend a protest in Hollywood, Los Angeles on Wednesday

LOS ANGELES: People take a knee as they attend a protest in Hollywood, Los Angeles on Wednesday

LOS ANGELES: A protester yells at some police for not wearing masks as protesters pass through police lines in Hollywood

LOS ANGELES: A protester yells at some police for not wearing masks as protesters pass through police lines in Hollywood

On Chicago’s northwest side, a crowd of early-morning marchers was followed by a procession of honking cars in the Logan Square neighborhood.

The 8am march, which passed near Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot’s home, urged residents to ‘wake up’ to their protest of racial injustice and police brutality.

Organizers with the Freedom Road Socialist Organization and the Chicago Alliance Against Racist & Political Repression called for the creation of a civilian police oversight board.

Chicago Alliance organizer Frank Chapman also demanded that all prisoners be released from prisons.

‘Those are death camps right now, because of COVID-19,’ he said. ‘Free them all!’ 

CHICAGO: Organizers with the Freedom Road Socialist Organization and the Chicago Alliance Against Racist & Political Repression led the early morning march

CHICAGO: Organizers with the Freedom Road Socialist Organization and the Chicago Alliance Against Racist & Political Repression led the early morning march

CHICAGO: The 8am march, which passed near Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot's home, urged residents to 'wake up' to their protest of racial injustice and police brutality

CHICAGO: The 8am march, which passed near Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot’s home, urged residents to ‘wake up’ to their protest of racial injustice and police brutality

CHICAGO: The Chicago protesters took a knee in an intersection to make their voices heard

CHICAGO: The Chicago protesters took a knee in an intersection to make their voices heard

In Boston, a large group gathered at the Boston Common on Wednesday afternoon.

National Guardsmen and hundreds of police officers were on hand to maintain order.

Organizers called for the event to remain peaceful.

‘Massachusetts needs to let America know we do not stand for racism!’ organizers said in a Facebook post. ‘We need to show support for our fellow Americans and honor human life.’

The organizers said the event would end at 5.30pm, noting the city has a recommended curfew of 9pm due to the coronavirus pandemic.  

BOSTON: People at Boston Common take part in a protest following the death in Minneapolis police custody of George Floyd

BOSTON: People at Boston Common take part in a protest following the death in Minneapolis police custody of George Floyd

BOSTON: People hold up their hands during a protest following the death in Minneapolis police custody of George Floyd

BOSTON: People hold up their hands during a protest following the death in Minneapolis police custody of George Floyd

BOSTON: A demonstrator in Boston uses a megaphone during a protest on Boston Common on Wednesday

BOSTON: A demonstrator in Boston uses a megaphone during a protest on Boston Common on Wednesday

In Philadelphia, hundreds of people marched nearly two miles from City Hall to Temple University in sweaty 80 degree weather. 

They reached their final destination and remained there up until a city-wide 6pm curfew went into effect and organizers encouraged them to go home. 

It came as Philadelphia authorities announced that they had arrested a 25-year-old man who may be connected to a string of explosions at 50 ATM machines since Monday. 

The state attorney general said the explosions were part of a coordinated effort to steal the machines or take the money inside.  

The man arrested is accused of selling homemade dynamite on the streets with instructions on how to use it on ATMs, though authorities aren’t yet sure whether he is connected to the coordinated effort. 

One theft resulted in the death of a 24-year-old man hours after he tried to break into an ATM early Tuesday, authorities said.

PHILADELPHIA: Protesters in the City of Brotherly Love marched from City Hall to Temple University on Wednesday

PHILADELPHIA: Protesters in the City of Brotherly Love marched from City Hall to Temple University on Wednesday

PHILADELPHIA: Protesters gathered outside the 26th District Police station in Philly's Fishtown neighborhood on Wednesday

PHILADELPHIA: Protesters gathered outside the 26th District Police station in Philly’s Fishtown neighborhood on Wednesday

PHILADELPHIA: Protesters pray outside the 26th District Police station in Fishtown during a demonstration on Wednesday

PHILADELPHIA: Protesters pray outside the 26th District Police station in Fishtown during a demonstration on Wednesday

PHILADELPHIA: The protest outside the 26th District Police station dispersed when heavy rain hit the area

PHILADELPHIA: The protest outside the 26th District Police station dispersed when heavy rain hit the area

PHILADELPHIA: Authorities arrested a man who may be linked to a string of explosions at ATMs amid Philadelphia protests

PHILADELPHIA: Authorities arrested a man who may be linked to a string of explosions at ATMs amid Philadelphia protests

In Seattle, a crowd of protesters descended on City Hall, where police holding batons formed lines behind metal barricades. 

The demonstrators carried ‘Black Lives Matter’ signs and called for cutting the police department’s budget and shifting the money to social programs. 

They chanted for officers to remove their riot gear and knelt or sat together as they surrounded the building.

There’s been increasing criticism of the repeated use of tear gas and flash-bangs by Seattle police to disperse mostly peaceful crowds.

Mayor Jenny Durkan met with protest leaders in City Hall before meeting with demonstrators outside for a second straight day. 

City Attorney Peter Holmes noted that citizens had filed some 12,000 complaints over the police department´s handling of the protests.

SEATTLE: Protesters descended on Seattle's City Hall, where police holding batons formed lines behind barricades

SEATTLE: Protesters descended on Seattle’s City Hall, where police holding batons formed lines behind barricades

SEATTLE: The demonstrators carried 'Black Lives Matter' signs and called for cutting the police department's budget and shifting the money to social programs

SEATTLE: The demonstrators carried ‘Black Lives Matter’ signs and called for cutting the police department’s budget and shifting the money to social programs

SEATTLE: Protesters chanted for officers to remove their riot gear and knelt or sat together as they surrounded City Hall

SEATTLE: Protesters chanted for officers to remove their riot gear and knelt or sat together as they surrounded City Hall

In Montgomery, Alabama, a large group of demonstrators gathered at the state capitol building.

The large group marched from the Legacy Museum to the statehouse, where they gathered on the steps to protest against police brutality. 

They called for change and reconciliation. People of all ages and races, and members of the clergy were present. 

ALABAMA: A Black Lives Matter protest march to the Alabama State Capitol Building in Montgomery on Wednesday

ALABAMA: A Black Lives Matter protest march to the Alabama State Capitol Building in Montgomery on Wednesday

ALABAMA: Marches stroll past a Rosa Parks historic maker on their way to the Alabama State Capitol Building in Montgomery

ALABAMA: Marches stroll past a Rosa Parks historic maker on their way to the Alabama State Capitol Building in Montgomery

ALABAMA: The large group marched from the Legacy Museum to the statehouse, where they gathered on the steps to protest

ALABAMA: The large group marched from the Legacy Museum to the statehouse, where they gathered on the steps to protest

US Defense Secretary Mark Esper said on Wednesday he does not support invoking the Insurrection Act to deploy active-duty forces to quell civil unrest for now, despite President Donald Trump’s threats to militarize America’s response to mass protests.

Trump said this week he could use military forces in states that fail to crack down on sometimes violent protests over the killing of George Floyd, an unarmed black man, at the hands of a white police officer in Minneapolis.

‘The option to use active-duty forces in a law enforcement role should only be used as a matter of last resort and only in the most urgent and dire of situations. We are not in one of those situations now,’ Esper told a news briefing.

‘I do not support invoking the Insurrection Act.’

Esper’s news conference did not go over well with either the president or his top aides, an administration official said, speaking on the condition of anonymity.

To deploy the military on US soil for law enforcement purposes, Trump would need to invoke the 1807 Insurrection Act – something last done in 1992 in response to the Rodney King riots in Los Angeles.

IDAHO: 'We are not counter-protesters, we're just going to make sure Coeur d'Alene is safe' says Conrad Nelsen of Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, as he holds the flag while standing next to armed citizen Dan Carson, left, during a protest Tuesday

IDAHO: ‘We are not counter-protesters, we’re just going to make sure Coeur d’Alene is safe’ says Conrad Nelsen of Coeur d’Alene, Idaho, as he holds the flag while standing next to armed citizen Dan Carson, left, during a protest Tuesday

MISSOURI: Victoria Ezeufu raises her arms as she leads protesters down a highway Wednesday in St. Charles. Ezeufu helped organize the protest attended by several hundred people to speak out against the death of George Floyd

MISSOURI: Victoria Ezeufu raises her arms as she leads protesters down a highway Wednesday in St. Charles. Ezeufu helped organize the protest attended by several hundred people to speak out against the death of George Floyd

NEW JERSEY: Protesters take part in March for Peace in response to the death of George Floyd, in Vineland on Wednesday

NEW JERSEY: Protesters take part in March for Peace in response to the death of George Floyd, in Vineland on Wednesday

OHIO: Protesters walk with the Cleveland Heights police during a rally on Wednesday protesting the death of George Floyd

OHIO: Protesters walk with the Cleveland Heights police during a rally on Wednesday protesting the death of George Floyd

ARIZONA: Protesters rally Wednesday in Phoenix, demanding that the City Council defund the Phoenix Police Department

ARIZONA: Protesters rally Wednesday in Phoenix, demanding that the City Council defund the Phoenix Police Department

MICHIGAN: Protesters march after a rally in Detroit, Wednesday over the death of George Floyd, a black man

MICHIGAN: Protesters march after a rally in Detroit, Wednesday over the death of George Floyd, a black man

On Wednesday, the National Guard of Washington, DC, launched an investigation into claims that the Trump administration ordered a military helicopter to fly low as a ‘show of force’ against George Floyd protesters near the White House.

The helicopter, normally designated for use in medical evacuations, hovered low enough to create a deafening noise and spray protesters with rotor wash on Monday. 

On Wednesday, the commanding general of the DC Guard, Maj Gen William Walker, said in a statement that he directed the investigation.

The investigation comes as the federal government has promised to maximize its law enforcement presence in the nation’s capital. 

The helicopter is seen flying over protesters in DC

The low-flying helicopter is seen over protesters

WASHINGTON DC: The National Guard of Washington, DC, is investigating the use of one of its helicopters (left and right) to make a ‘show of force’ against George Floyd protesters near the White House

WASHINGTON DC: Two Defense Department officials said the Trump administration had ordered military aircraft to fly above Washington on Monday night as a 'show of force' against demonstrators

WASHINGTON DC: Two Defense Department officials said the Trump administration had ordered military aircraft to fly above Washington on Monday night as a ‘show of force’ against demonstrators

Scores of heavily-armed federal officers in tactical gear have been on the district’s streets for days, after demonstrators set fires, broke store windows and stole items from the shelves and left police officers injured.

The Trump administration has made an effort to show a use of force in Washington. Hours before a 7pm curfew on Tuesday, cars were being stopped at military checkpoints downtown, and a cavalry of armored military vehicles could be seen driving through the district. 

Mayor Muriel Bowser said the administration had floated the idea of taking over the Metropolitan Police Department, a proposal she strongly rejected. She threatened to take legal action if the federal government attempted to do so.

Two Defense Department officials said the administration had ordered military aircraft to fly above Washington on Monday night as a ‘show of force’ against demonstrators. 

Zoe Kravitz joins protest in London demonstrating the killing George Floyd and police brutality


Zoe Kravtiz had been filming The Batman in London in March when she went into self-quarantine with her husband Karl Glusman amid the COVID-19 outbreak.

But that hasn’t stopped the actress from having her voice be heard in the wake of the killing of African-American George Floyd in the US at the hands of a white Minneapolis police officer as three other officers looked on.

With protests popping up in many of the big cities across the US over the last nine days, Kravitz was among the thousands of people who took to the streets of London to protest his death and police brutality. 

Rallying call: Zoe Kravitz joined the thousands of people who took to the streets in London, England to protest the death of African-American George Floyd and police brutality

The Big Little Lies star, 31, shared a photo on Instagram of herself holding up a sign as she stood among the peaceful demonstrators.

That sign read: ‘Dear America, I can’t believe what you say, because I see what you do, Black Lives Matter,’ which was a quote from the late James Baldwin, an American-American novelist, poet and activist.

‘GO HEAD LONDON. #blacklivesmatter,’ Kravitz wrote in the caption.

Lockdown: The actress was filming The Batman, with co-star Robert Pattinson, in London when production was shutdown March 14 due to the coronavirus outbreak

Lockdown: The actress was filming The Batman, with co-star Robert Pattinson, in London when production was shutdown March 14 due to the coronavirus outbreak

Proud papa: Her father, rocker Lenny Kravitz, wasted little time taking to the comments section and wrote,'That’s my girl!'

Proud papa: Her father, rocker Lenny Kravitz, wasted little time taking to the comments section and wrote,’That’s my girl!’

Wearing a large hat, dark sunglasses and a black face covering, due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, Kravitz looked nearly unrecognizable in the photo. 

But, in keeping with her Bohemian-like fashion sense, she also donned a black leather jacket, baggy black pants and a white-patterned shirt as she proudly held the sign over her head. 

Her father, rocker Lenny Kravitz, wasted little time taking to the comments section and wrote,’That’s my girl!’ 

Family matters: Kravtiz's mother, Lisa Bonet, and her father have both been vocal when it comes to standing up for human rights

Family matters: Kravtiz’s mother, Lisa Bonet, and her father have both been vocal when it comes to standing up for human rights

Derek Chauvin, who was seen in videos pressing his knee into Floyd’s neck for nearly nine minutes, was charged on Wednesday with a new, more serious count of second-degree murder.

He was previously charged with third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter. 

The three other officers — Thomas K. Lane, Tou Thao, and J. Alexander Kueng — at the scene of the killing were charged with aiding and abetting second-degree murder. 

Taking a stand: Protestors marched into Hyde Park in London on Wednesday in protest of the killing of George Floyd in the US and police brutality

Taking a stand: Protestors marched into Hyde Park in London on Wednesday in protest of the killing of George Floyd in the US and police brutality

Kravitz is still awaiting word on when production and filming of The Batman, which she will play Catwoman, will pickup again.  

The superhero franchise re-boot, starring Robert Pattinson as Batman, has also had its premiere date pushed back from June 25, 2021 to October 1, 2021.

After months in the UK, the actress told Vanity Fair that she deeply misses her father and mother, actress Lisa Bonet, who have both been self-isolating in the US. 

‘First I will go hug all of my family and friends,’ she said when asked what she will do when the pandemic is over. ‘Then I will go to Emilio’s Ballato and eat a scary amount of pasta.’    

Sequestered: Kravitz has been quarantined in London amid the COVID-19 pandemic wit husband Karl Glusman: the couple are pictured in February 2019

Sequestered: Kravitz has been quarantined in London amid the COVID-19 pandemic wit husband Karl Glusman: the couple are pictured in February 2019

Hugh Jackman is slammed by fans for sharing a picture of a protestor hugging a police officer


‘You’re helping spread propaganda’: Hugh Jackman is slammed and loses followers on Twitter for sharing a picture of a protestor embracing a police officer during the Black Lives Matter protests

Hugh Jackman has been slammed by fans for sharing a photo of a protestor hugging an officer following the death of George Floyd in police custody.

The actor, 52, posted the picture, taken during the Black Lives Matter protests, to his Twitter page on Wednesday and captioned the post: ‘Solidarity’.

Fans immediately hit back at Hugh, claiming he should be sharing pictures of police brutality during the riots instead, and also criticised the actor for saying it represents unity.

‘That’s an unfollow from me!’Actor Hugh Jackman (pictured) has been slammed by fans for sharing a photo of a protestor embracing a police officer during the Black Lives Matter movement in Los Angeles

Post: The 52-year-old actor posted the picture to his Twitter on Wednesday and captioned the post: 'Solidarity'

Post: The 52-year-old actor posted the picture to his Twitter on Wednesday and captioned the post: ‘Solidarity’ 

‘This is so disappointing. You’re helping to spread propaganda. If you want to share something, there’s plenty of images and videos of protests from around the world that don’t include PR opportunities for police officers,’ one person tweeted.

‘Jesus Christ, someone show me one celebrity that isn’t a disappointment,’ another person commented.

One wrote: ‘I’m sorry but you can’t post that if you aren’t also sharing the videos of police brutality! The news is doing enough of sharing this bullsh*t instead of what’s actually going on. Peaceful protestors being attacked for no reason by the cops who are supposed to keep them safe.’

‘That’s going to be an unfollow from me man,’ one person said. ‘Wait until you see a picture of the cop tear gassing the protestor right after,’ another commented.

Some fans praised Hugh for sharing the picture, with one writing: ‘Solidarity the way it should be. I support you. Stay safe.’

‘Finally a message from a celebrity I can respect,’ another person said.  

'This is so disappointing': Fans immediately hit back at Hugh for sharing the photo, and also criticised him for claiming that it represents unity

‘This is so disappointing’: Fans immediately hit back at Hugh for sharing the photo, and also criticised him for claiming that it represents unity

Protests and riots have erupted across the U.S. after George Floyd, an unarmed black man, died in Minneapolis last Monday when a white cop pressed his knee against his neck for eight minutes.

Mr Floyd had been accused of using a counterfeit $20 bill at a deli.

One of the officers involved, Derek Michael Chauvin, was charged with third-degree murder and manslaughter days after footage of the incident went viral.

Over the past week, protesters in the US have taken to the streets demanding reform after what many consider another senseless death and example of police brutality. 

On Saturday, Los Angeles descended into violence as cops in riot gear clashed with protesters who sprayed graffiti and torched police cruisers while officers shot rubber bullets into crowds and beat demonstrators with batons.

Protests and riots erupted in the U.S. after George Floyd (pictured), an unarmed black man, died after a white police officer pressed his knee against his neck for eight minutes

Protests and riots erupted in the U.S. after George Floyd (pictured), an unarmed black man, died after a white police officer pressed his knee against his neck for eight minutes

Capitol Police kneel before protesters in DC as George Floyd protests continue nationwide


The ninth night of protests over the death of George Floyd came to a relatively peaceful end on Wednesday as crowds in several cities dispersed without aggressive intervention from police enforcing curfews.

In Atlanta, streets that were filled with hundreds of protesters during the day emptied out when a 9pm curfew went into effect. 

Similar scenes unfolded in Philadelphia, where the 7pm curfew was accompanied by a sudden rain shower that soaked protesters on their way home.  

In Washington, DC, hundreds of people remained on the streets as an 11pm curfew approached and a feeling of anxiety hung in the air between the crowds and a line of troops watching over them in riot gear.  

Tensions were higher in New York City, however, as several people were taken into custody and at least one police officer was injured when a scuffle broke out in Brooklyn, where hundreds of people were marching to Cadman Plaza. 

But thus far there has been a marked quiet compared with the unrest of the past few nights, which included fires and shootings in some cities while police resorted to forceful tactics including tear gas, pepper spray and rubber bullets to break up crowds.  

WASHINGTON DC: Protesters hold up their phones during a demonstration as a city-wide 11pm curfew approached

NEW YORK: Scuffles broke out between police and protesters marching in Brooklyn on Wednesday night

NEW YORK: Scuffles broke out between police and protesters marching in Brooklyn on Wednesday night

PHILADELPHIA: Rain showers moved through Philadelphia on Wednesday night, causing protest crowds to disperse

PHILADELPHIA: Rain showers moved through Philadelphia on Wednesday night, causing protest crowds to disperse

The US has been rocked by over a week of tumult since George Floyd, a black man, was killed in Minneapolis after white police officer Derek Chauvin pinned him to the ground by kneeling on his neck on Memorial Day. 

Floyd, who was in handcuffs at the time, died after Chauvin ignored bystander shouts to get off him and Floyd’s cries that he couldn’t breathe. 

His death, captured on citizen video, has sparked days of protests in Minneapolis that quickly spread to cities across America.  

Charges against Chauvin were upgraded to second-degree murder on Wednesday, and the three other officers at the scene were newly charged with aiding and abetting murder.

However, the news seemed to do little to quell the protests and unrest, which continued for a ninth straight day in dozens of cities including New York City, Los Angeles, Chicago, Boston and Philadelphia. 

WASHINGTON DC: US Capitol police kneel as demonstrators protest the death of George Floyd at the Capitol on Wednesday after the protesters demanded they take a knee

WASHINGTON DC: US Capitol police kneel as demonstrators protest the death of George Floyd at the Capitol on Wednesday after the protesters demanded they take a knee

NEW YORK: Hundreds joined the march near Prospect Park in the Brooklyn borough of New York on Wednesday

NEW YORK: Hundreds joined the march near Prospect Park in the Brooklyn borough of New York on Wednesday 

BOSTON: People take part in a rally following the death in Minneapolis police custody of George Floyd, on Wednesday

BOSTON: People take part in a rally following the death in Minneapolis police custody of George Floyd, on Wednesday

CHICAGO: Demonstrators in the Logan Square neighborhood of Chicago also marched on Wednesday

CHICAGO: Demonstrators in the Logan Square neighborhood of Chicago also marched on Wednesday

LOS ANGELES: Protesters in Los Angeles pass through police lines after negotiating during a demonstration on Wednesday

LOS ANGELES: Protesters in Los Angeles pass through police lines after negotiating during a demonstration on Wednesday

SEATTLE: Hundreds of people marched through Seattle's Capitol Hill neighborhood on their way to City Hall on Wednesday

SEATTLE: Hundreds of people marched through Seattle’s Capitol Hill neighborhood on their way to City Hall on Wednesday

In Washington DC, some Capitol Police in charge of protecting Congress took a knee as protesters shouted slogans, similar to other scenes that have played out across the nation.

While many view the gesture as an act of solidarity with peaceful protests, as police join in condemning Floyd’s in-custody death, others have criticized cops who participate as bowing down before protesters. 

President Donald Trump waded into the debate on Wednesday morning for the first time, retweeting a message that said New York City police were being forced to ‘bend a knee to terrorists’.  

Protesters in DC sent a strong message to police hours later as they lay face-down in front of the Capitol in silence.

Organizers asked them to stay down and stay quiet for the about same amount of time Chauvin knelt on Floyd’s neck. 

In the afternoon, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi emerged from the Capitol building to greet and mingle with the protesters. 

At one point the crowd knelt together as they sang ‘Amazing Grace’ and chanted: ‘We are not going anywhere.’ 

Meanwhile law enforcement officers in riot gear stood watch over the crowd, which stretched down 16th Street near the White House.

Mayor Muriel Bowser moved the citywide curfew back from 7pm to 11pm curfew after a peaceful night of protests on Tuesday.  

WASHINGTON DC: Demonstrators protest the death of George Floyd as they gather Wednesday on Capitol Hill

WASHINGTON DC: Demonstrators protest the death of George Floyd as they gather Wednesday on Capitol Hill

WASHINGTON DC: A protester demonstrating against the death of George Floyd talks to Capitol Police on the East Front of the US Capitol on Wednesday

WASHINGTON DC: A protester demonstrating against the death of George Floyd talks to Capitol Police on the East Front of the US Capitol on Wednesday

WASHINGTON DC: Demonstrators participate in a Black Lives Matter rally as protests continue over the death in Minneapolis police custody of George Floyd, outside the US Capitol on Wednesday

WASHINGTON DC: Demonstrators participate in a Black Lives Matter rally as protests continue over the death in Minneapolis police custody of George Floyd, outside the US Capitol on Wednesday

WASHINGTON DC:Demonstrators on the East side of the US Capitol in protest the death of George Floyd on Wednesday

WASHINGTON DC:Demonstrators on the East side of the US Capitol in protest the death of George Floyd on Wednesday

WASHINGTON DC: Police gather as the first line to keep demonstrators away from Lafayette Square near the White House

WASHINGTON DC: Police gather as the first line to keep demonstrators away from Lafayette Square near the White House

In New York City, the scene of massive protests as well as shocking looting after dark in recent days, the streets were calmed by afternoon rain showers.

However, as the weather cleared by 4pm, several large groups began gathering in Washington Square Park and elsewhere.

One group marched up 5th Avenue toward Central Park.

Storefronts in New York were fortified at new levels of security in fears of violence breaking out after dark, with companies adding razorwire and guard dogs to deter looting. 

A large protest march also occurred in the Brooklyn neighborhood of Bed-Stuy. Some business owners in the neighborhood prepared by putting signs saying ‘black owned’ in their storefront windows. 

Meanwhile, city officials expressed hope that an earlier curfew and refined police tactics will bring the city closer to restoring order after days of unrest. 

‘Last night we took a step forward in moving out of this difficult period we’ve had the last few days and moving to a better time,’ Mayor Bill de Blasio said.

Gov Andrew Cuomo, who was critical of the police response on prior nights, said the city Tuesday ‘was much, much better than the night before’.

‘It worked. We got results,’ Cuomo said. ‘Let’s just remember what we did last night and keep that going.’

De Blasio rejected President Trump’s urging and Cuomo’s offer to send in the National Guard to quell the unrest, saying the NYPD was best suited for the task and fearing out-of-town Guardsmen unfamiliar with city dynamics could spark confrontations.

Trump warned that if the city didn’t maintain order, he would take the matter into his own hands, though he didn’t say what action he might take.

NEW YORK: In Brooklyn, protesters gathered in Grand Army Plaza on Wednesday afternoon after the skies cleared

NEW YORK: In Brooklyn, protesters gathered in Grand Army Plaza on Wednesday afternoon after the skies cleared

NEW YORK: A demonstrator attends a protest against the death in Minneapolis police custody of George Floyd in Brooklyn

NEW YORK: A demonstrator attends a protest against the death in Minneapolis police custody of George Floyd in Brooklyn

NEW YORK: In Manhattan, a group also gathered outside of the Stonewall Inn to protest the death of George Floyd

NEW YORK: In Manhattan, a group also gathered outside of the Stonewall Inn to protest the death of George Floyd

NEW YORK: People in Manhattan rally against the death in Minneapolis police custody of George Floyd on Wednesday

NEW YORK: People in Manhattan rally against the death in Minneapolis police custody of George Floyd on Wednesday

NEW YORK: People rally against the death in Minneapolis police custody of George Floyd, in Manhattan

NEW YORK: People rally against the death in Minneapolis police custody of George Floyd, in Manhattan

In Los Angeles, protesters gathered in Hollywood on Wednesday to voice their discontent.

Hundreds appeared to be peacefully marching near La Cienega Boulevard and Santa Monica Boulevard. 

The demonstrators blocked traffic at the intersection just before 1pm and each got down on one knee and took a moment of silence. 

Los Angeles County has ordered another overnight curfew, but it will be four hours shorter.

The curfew will begin at 9pm Wednesday and end at 5am Thursday. Previous curfews ran from 6pm to 6am.

A county statement says officials are assessing public safety needs on a daily basis.

A few municipalities in the sprawling county continue to have stricter curfews. Huge demonstrations in Los Angeles on Tuesday were peaceful, and subsequent arrests were only for curfew violations.

On Wednesday the Los Angeles County District Attorney’s Office announced that 60 people were facing charges for crimes during protests in the city over the past week.

Most of the charges were for looting, but others include assault and/or battery of a peace officer, robbery, burglary and receiving stolen property. 

The district attorney’s office said it expected more charges to be brought later this week.  

About 2,700 people were arrested by the Los Angeles Police Department between Friday and Monday, Officer Rosario Cervantes told CNN. 

It’s unclear how many of those arrests were linked to protests.  

LOS ANGELES: Protesters gather at the intersection of La Cienega Boulevard and Santa Monica Boulevard as they prepare to march during a demonstration in West Hollywood

LOS ANGELES: Protesters gather at the intersection of La Cienega Boulevard and Santa Monica Boulevard as they prepare to march during a demonstration in West Hollywood

LOS ANGELES: People attend a protest against the death in Minneapolis police custody of George Floyd, in Hollywood

LOS ANGELES: People attend a protest against the death in Minneapolis police custody of George Floyd, in Hollywood

LOS ANGELES: California National Guard members stand guard as protesters walk past them at the Hollywood Walk of Fame

LOS ANGELES: California National Guard members stand guard as protesters walk past them at the Hollywood Walk of Fame

LOS ANGELES: People take a knee as they attend a protest in Hollywood, Los Angeles on Wednesday

LOS ANGELES: People take a knee as they attend a protest in Hollywood, Los Angeles on Wednesday

LOS ANGELES: A protester yells at some police for not wearing masks as protesters pass through police lines in Hollywood

LOS ANGELES: A protester yells at some police for not wearing masks as protesters pass through police lines in Hollywood

On Chicago’s northwest side, a crowd of early-morning marchers was followed by a procession of honking cars in the Logan Square neighborhood.

The 8am march, which passed near Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot’s home, urged residents to ‘wake up’ to their protest of racial injustice and police brutality.

Organizers with the Freedom Road Socialist Organization and the Chicago Alliance Against Racist & Political Repression called for the creation of a civilian police oversight board.

Chicago Alliance organizer Frank Chapman also demanded that all prisoners be released from prisons.

‘Those are death camps right now, because of COVID-19,’ he said. ‘Free them all!’ 

CHICAGO: Organizers with the Freedom Road Socialist Organization and the Chicago Alliance Against Racist & Political Repression led the early morning march

CHICAGO: Organizers with the Freedom Road Socialist Organization and the Chicago Alliance Against Racist & Political Repression led the early morning march

CHICAGO: The 8am march, which passed near Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot's home, urged residents to 'wake up' to their protest of racial injustice and police brutality

CHICAGO: The 8am march, which passed near Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot’s home, urged residents to ‘wake up’ to their protest of racial injustice and police brutality

CHICAGO: The Chicago protesters took a knee in an intersection to make their voices heard

CHICAGO: The Chicago protesters took a knee in an intersection to make their voices heard

In Boston, a large group gathered at the Boston Common on Wednesday afternoon.

National Guardsmen and hundreds of police officers were on hand to maintain order.

Organizers called for the event to remain peaceful.

‘Massachusetts needs to let America know we do not stand for racism!’ organizers said in a Facebook post. ‘We need to show support for our fellow Americans and honor human life.’

The organizers said the event would end at 5.30pm, noting the city has a recommended curfew of 9pm due to the coronavirus pandemic.  

BOSTON: People at Boston Common take part in a protest following the death in Minneapolis police custody of George Floyd

BOSTON: People at Boston Common take part in a protest following the death in Minneapolis police custody of George Floyd

BOSTON: People hold up their hands during a protest following the death in Minneapolis police custody of George Floyd

BOSTON: People hold up their hands during a protest following the death in Minneapolis police custody of George Floyd

BOSTON: A demonstrator in Boston uses a megaphone during a protest on Boston Common on Wednesday

BOSTON: A demonstrator in Boston uses a megaphone during a protest on Boston Common on Wednesday

In Philadelphia, hundreds of people marched nearly two miles from City Hall to Temple University in sweaty 80 degree weather. 

They reached their final destination and remained there up until a city-wide 6pm curfew went into effect and organizers encouraged them to go home. 

It came as Philadelphia authorities announced that they had arrested a 25-year-old man who may be connected to a string of explosions at 50 ATM machines since Monday. 

The state attorney general said the explosions were part of a coordinated effort to steal the machines or take the money inside.  

The man arrested is accused of selling homemade dynamite on the streets with instructions on how to use it on ATMs, though authorities aren’t yet sure whether he is connected to the coordinated effort. 

One theft resulted in the death of a 24-year-old man hours after he tried to break into an ATM early Tuesday, authorities said.

PHILADELPHIA: Protesters in the City of Brotherly Love marched from City Hall to Temple University on Wednesday

PHILADELPHIA: Protesters in the City of Brotherly Love marched from City Hall to Temple University on Wednesday

PHILADELPHIA: Protesters gathered outside the 26th District Police station in Philly's Fishtown neighborhood on Wednesday

PHILADELPHIA: Protesters gathered outside the 26th District Police station in Philly’s Fishtown neighborhood on Wednesday

PHILADELPHIA: Protesters pray outside the 26th District Police station in Fishtown during a demonstration on Wednesday

PHILADELPHIA: Protesters pray outside the 26th District Police station in Fishtown during a demonstration on Wednesday

PHILADELPHIA: The protest outside the 26th District Police station dispersed when heavy rain hit the area

PHILADELPHIA: The protest outside the 26th District Police station dispersed when heavy rain hit the area

PHILADELPHIA: Authorities arrested a man who may be linked to a string of explosions at ATMs amid Philadelphia protests

PHILADELPHIA: Authorities arrested a man who may be linked to a string of explosions at ATMs amid Philadelphia protests

In Seattle, a crowd of protesters descended on City Hall, where police holding batons formed lines behind metal barricades. 

The demonstrators carried ‘Black Lives Matter’ signs and called for cutting the police department’s budget and shifting the money to social programs. 

They chanted for officers to remove their riot gear and knelt or sat together as they surrounded the building.

There’s been increasing criticism of the repeated use of tear gas and flash-bangs by Seattle police to disperse mostly peaceful crowds.

Mayor Jenny Durkan met with protest leaders in City Hall before meeting with demonstrators outside for a second straight day. 

City Attorney Peter Holmes noted that citizens had filed some 12,000 complaints over the police department´s handling of the protests.

SEATTLE: Protesters descended on Seattle's City Hall, where police holding batons formed lines behind barricades

SEATTLE: Protesters descended on Seattle’s City Hall, where police holding batons formed lines behind barricades

SEATTLE: The demonstrators carried 'Black Lives Matter' signs and called for cutting the police department's budget and shifting the money to social programs

SEATTLE: The demonstrators carried ‘Black Lives Matter’ signs and called for cutting the police department’s budget and shifting the money to social programs

SEATTLE: Protesters chanted for officers to remove their riot gear and knelt or sat together as they surrounded City Hall

SEATTLE: Protesters chanted for officers to remove their riot gear and knelt or sat together as they surrounded City Hall

In Montgomery, Alabama, a large group of demonstrators gathered at the state capitol building.

The large group marched from the Legacy Museum to the statehouse, where they gathered on the steps to protest against police brutality. 

They called for change and reconciliation. People of all ages and races, and members of the clergy were present. 

ALABAMA: A Black Lives Matter protest march to the Alabama State Capitol Building in Montgomery on Wednesday

ALABAMA: A Black Lives Matter protest march to the Alabama State Capitol Building in Montgomery on Wednesday

ALABAMA: Marches stroll past a Rosa Parks historic maker on their way to the Alabama State Capitol Building in Montgomery

ALABAMA: Marches stroll past a Rosa Parks historic maker on their way to the Alabama State Capitol Building in Montgomery

ALABAMA: The large group marched from the Legacy Museum to the statehouse, where they gathered on the steps to protest

ALABAMA: The large group marched from the Legacy Museum to the statehouse, where they gathered on the steps to protest

US Defense Secretary Mark Esper said on Wednesday he does not support invoking the Insurrection Act to deploy active-duty forces to quell civil unrest for now, despite President Donald Trump’s threats to militarize America’s response to mass protests.

Trump said this week he could use military forces in states that fail to crack down on sometimes violent protests over the killing of George Floyd, an unarmed black man, at the hands of a white police officer in Minneapolis.

‘The option to use active-duty forces in a law enforcement role should only be used as a matter of last resort and only in the most urgent and dire of situations. We are not in one of those situations now,’ Esper told a news briefing.

‘I do not support invoking the Insurrection Act.’

Esper’s news conference did not go over well with either the president or his top aides, an administration official said, speaking on the condition of anonymity.

To deploy the military on US soil for law enforcement purposes, Trump would need to invoke the 1807 Insurrection Act – something last done in 1992 in response to the Rodney King riots in Los Angeles.

IDAHO: 'We are not counter-protesters, we're just going to make sure Coeur d'Alene is safe' says Conrad Nelsen of Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, as he holds the flag while standing next to armed citizen Dan Carson, left, during a protest Tuesday

IDAHO: ‘We are not counter-protesters, we’re just going to make sure Coeur d’Alene is safe’ says Conrad Nelsen of Coeur d’Alene, Idaho, as he holds the flag while standing next to armed citizen Dan Carson, left, during a protest Tuesday

MISSOURI: Victoria Ezeufu raises her arms as she leads protesters down a highway Wednesday in St. Charles. Ezeufu helped organize the protest attended by several hundred people to speak out against the death of George Floyd

MISSOURI: Victoria Ezeufu raises her arms as she leads protesters down a highway Wednesday in St. Charles. Ezeufu helped organize the protest attended by several hundred people to speak out against the death of George Floyd

NEW JERSEY: Protesters take part in March for Peace in response to the death of George Floyd, in Vineland on Wednesday

NEW JERSEY: Protesters take part in March for Peace in response to the death of George Floyd, in Vineland on Wednesday

OHIO: Protesters walk with the Cleveland Heights police during a rally on Wednesday protesting the death of George Floyd

OHIO: Protesters walk with the Cleveland Heights police during a rally on Wednesday protesting the death of George Floyd

ARIZONA: Protesters rally Wednesday in Phoenix, demanding that the City Council defund the Phoenix Police Department

ARIZONA: Protesters rally Wednesday in Phoenix, demanding that the City Council defund the Phoenix Police Department

MICHIGAN: Protesters march after a rally in Detroit, Wednesday over the death of George Floyd, a black man

MICHIGAN: Protesters march after a rally in Detroit, Wednesday over the death of George Floyd, a black man

On Wednesday, the National Guard of Washington, DC, launched an investigation into claims that the Trump administration ordered a military helicopter to fly low as a ‘show of force’ against George Floyd protesters near the White House.

The helicopter, normally designated for use in medical evacuations, hovered low enough to create a deafening noise and spray protesters with rotor wash on Monday. 

On Wednesday, the commanding general of the DC Guard, Maj Gen William Walker, said in a statement that he directed the investigation.

The investigation comes as the federal government has promised to maximize its law enforcement presence in the nation’s capital. 

The helicopter is seen flying over protesters in DC

The low-flying helicopter is seen over protesters

WASHINGTON DC: The National Guard of Washington, DC, is investigating the use of one of its helicopters (left and right) to make a ‘show of force’ against George Floyd protesters near the White House

WASHINGTON DC: Two Defense Department officials said the Trump administration had ordered military aircraft to fly above Washington on Monday night as a 'show of force' against demonstrators

WASHINGTON DC: Two Defense Department officials said the Trump administration had ordered military aircraft to fly above Washington on Monday night as a ‘show of force’ against demonstrators

Scores of heavily-armed federal officers in tactical gear have been on the district’s streets for days, after demonstrators set fires, broke store windows and stole items from the shelves and left police officers injured.

The Trump administration has made an effort to show a use of force in Washington. Hours before a 7pm curfew on Tuesday, cars were being stopped at military checkpoints downtown, and a cavalry of armored military vehicles could be seen driving through the district. 

Mayor Muriel Bowser said the administration had floated the idea of taking over the Metropolitan Police Department, a proposal she strongly rejected. She threatened to take legal action if the federal government attempted to do so.

Two Defense Department officials said the administration had ordered military aircraft to fly above Washington on Monday night as a ‘show of force’ against demonstrators. 

Ellen DeGeneres is receiving backlash for a since-deleted tweet using the term ‘people of color’


Ellen DeGeneres is receiving backlash for a since-deleted tweet using the term ‘people of color’

  •  The host has been criticized for being ‘ tone-deaf’ in her initial message
  • Screenshots of the deleted tweet from Saturday are resurfacing 
  • The tweet read: ‘Like so many of you, I am angry and I am sad. People of color in this country have faced injustice for far too long’
  • She later posted new information about where she’s donated her money

Ellen DeGeneres is facing criticism on social media after posting and subsequently deleting a tweet about the worldwide protests after the killing of George Floyd. 

Immediately social media users flocked to Twitter to point out her message was ‘tone-deaf’ and hypocritical, as many pointed to her controversial friendship with George W. Bush. 

‘Like so many of you, I am angry and I am sad,’ DeGeneres wrote, according to screenshots of her since-deleted post on Saturday. ‘People of color in this country have faced injustice for far too long. For things to change, things must change.’  

Controversial: Ellen DeGeneres is facing criticism on social media after posting and subsequently deleting a tweet about the worldwide protests after the killing of George Floyd

The 62-year-old comedian added: ‘We must commit ourselves to this change with conviction and love,’ the message read.

Many questioned her decision to shy away from specifically addressing the black community, with one of her followers firing, ‘Not people of color. George Floyd was black. Why are being so cautious? Seriously?’ 

‘I still find it funny how Ellen Degeneres, a woman who is famous for boastfully signing life-size checks to random people on her show, can’t even post a screenshot on the internet of her donating money in support of Black lives,’ another chimed in.

Backlash: Immediately social media users flocked to Twitter to point out her message was 'tone-deaf' and 'hypocritical,' as many pointed to her controversial friendship with George W. Bush

Backlash: Immediately social media users flocked to Twitter to point out her message was ‘tone-deaf’ and ‘hypocritical,’ as many pointed to her controversial friendship with George W. Bush

After Ellen deleted her first tweet, she posted two new messages about donating to  the George Floyd Memorial Fund, the NAACP Legal Defense Fund, Black Lives Matter and the ACLU. 

People were still unhappy, as they continued to express their distain for hanging out with the former Republican president, who passed and upheld anti-LGBT policies for years. 

Additionally, she was slammed for cutting her employees wages by ‘60% during the pandemic’ and some pointed to the ongoing rumors of her behind-the-scenes bad behavior. 

Damage control: After deleting her first tweet, she posted two new messages about donating to to the George Floyd Memorial Fund, the NAACP Legal Defense Fund, Black Lives Matter and the ACLU.

Damage control: After deleting her first tweet, she posted two new messages about donating to to the George Floyd Memorial Fund, the NAACP Legal Defense Fund, Black Lives Matter and the ACLU.

Last month, she was reportedly ‘at the end of her rope’ over allegations that she is unkind and mistreats staffers. 

At the time, a former Ellen DeGeneres show staffer claimed the presenter ‘isn’t always nice’ and another told the New York Post: ‘The stories are all true!’

They said: ‘Is she always nice? No. It irritates me that people think she’s all sweetness and light and she gets away with it.’ 

Public perception: Last month, she was reportedly 'at the end of her rope' over allegations that she is unkind and mistreats staffers

Public perception: Last month, she was reportedly ‘at the end of her rope’ over allegations that she is unkind and mistreats staffers

The stories about Ellen started circulating after comic Kevin T. Porter sent out a tweet in March urging people to message him ‘the most insane stories [they’ve] heard’ about Ellen in an effort to raise money for the Los Angeles Food Bank.

Porter was flooded with written accounts by various Twitter users who claimed to have had less than savory interactions with Ellen – who he labeled as ‘notoriously one of the meanest people alive’ – over the years.

Then in early April, Ellen was slammed on social media for cracking a joke on her daytime chat show that being home all the time during the COVID-19 pandemic was akin to being behind bars.

Unhappy staff: Crew members claim they finally heard from production executives last month, when they were told to expect a 60per cent pay decrease, even while the show continues airing

Unhappy staff: Crew members claim they finally heard from production executives last month, when they were told to expect a 60per cent pay decrease, even while the show continues airing

At the time, Variety also reported that the main stage crew for her show – roughly 20 people – received ‘no communication’ about issues like pay and working hours for over a month.   

The show’s crew were outraged over her decision to hire a non-union tech company to help DeGeneres broadcast from home, while allegedly reducing the salaries of the show’s usual union team by 60 percent amid the coronavirus lockdown. 

Meanwhile, Ellen herself is said to have a $77million per year contract for her talk show. Her total net worth is estimated to be a whopping $330million.