Ten popular 1980s and 1990s cars that could soon be extinct


Some popular cars that were a mainstay on Britain’s roads in the 1980s and 1990s are extremely close to extinction, according to new research.

Models including the Lada Riva, Alfa Romeo 146 and Fiat Uno – all of which were stalwarts in the eighties and nineties – are starting to dwindle, Driver and Vehicle Licencing Agency stats suggest.

Here’s a rundown of the 10 models identified as being most at risk of disappearing in the next 12 months…

Ar-Riva-derci: We could soon be saying goodbye to the Lada Riva. It might have been fairly popular back in the ’80s, but just 49 examples are in existence today

The list of cars in ‘terminal decline’ has been revealed by Retro Cars magazine, which collated data from the DVLA to produce the list. 

According to the figures, the most endangered car of the 1980s and 1990s is the Lada Riva.

At its height in the late 1980s, Britons were buying around 30,000 examples of the Russian brand’s most popular model.

Back then, a new one Riva would set buyers back around £3,000, making it an affordable – if not the most desirable to be seen in – car for families.

However, wind the clocks forward to the end of 2019 (when the research was conducted) and there are just 49 Rivas known to be surviving in the UK.

That makes it a rarer sight than many supercars on today’s roads.   

The 10 popular ’80s and ’90s car due to disappear in the UK 

The top 10 list has been provided by Retro Car magazine. The figure for each model is the number remaining, according to DVLA stats.

1. Lada Riva – 49 examples

2. Alfa Romeo 146 – 89 examples

3. Fiat Uno – 218 examples

4. Renault 21 – 221 examples

5. Vauxhall Carlton – 270 examples

6. Citroen BX – 286 examples

7. Nissan Bluebird – 324 examples

8. Volvo 440 – 407 examples

9. Peugeot 309 – 409 examples

10. Rover 800 – 468 examples

The Alfa Romeo 146 - and the 145 hatchback sister car - were a small (and not always reliable) offering from the Italian car maker in the mid-'90s. Just 89 are said to be registered in the UK

The Alfa Romeo 146 – and the 145 hatchback sister car – were a small (and not always reliable) offering from the Italian car maker in the mid-’90s. Just 89 are said to be registered in the UK

The Fiat Uno was once a very popular small car in the late 1980s and early '90s. Just 218 are owned in the UK at the end of 2019, Retro Cars claims

The Fiat Uno was once a very popular small car in the late 1980s and early ’90s. Just 218 are owned in the UK at the end of 2019, Retro Cars claims

Slightly more upmarket but no less at risk is the Alfa Romeo 146.

The boxy saloon, produced from the mid-’90s to 2000, is second on the endangered automotive list from its era.

A mere 89 are left on the road in the UK, according to DVLA stats.

More commonly seen cars from the era are also in grave danger, though, with cars that were once in the UK’s top 10 seller lists having disappeared almost completely. 

Among them are the last remaining 468 Rover 800s, 409 Peugeot 309s, 324 Nissan Bluebirds, 286 Citroen BXs and 218 Fiat Unos.

French saloons, like the 21 pictured - were all the rage in their day. Not so much anymore, with only 221 with registered UK owners

French saloons, like the 21 pictured – were all the rage in their day. Not so much anymore, with only 221 with registered UK owners

Not to be confused with the Lotus-tuned Carlton, the standard family saloon wasn't much to shout about. Some 270 examples are apparently still in UK ownership, surprisingly

Not to be confused with the Lotus-tuned Carlton, the standard family saloon wasn’t much to shout about. Some 270 examples are apparently still in UK ownership, surprisingly

While this list is predominantly made up of relatively shoddy motors, the Citroen BX (especially Turbo examples) are hugely collectible these days. Retro Cars states there are 206 in the UK at the moment

While this list is predominantly made up of relatively shoddy motors, the Citroen BX (especially Turbo examples) are hugely collectible these days. Retro Cars states there are 206 in the UK at the moment

The vanishing act is causing problems for those who would like to buy into the next generation of everyday classic cars and is particularly hitting younger car enthusiasts.

Craig Cheetham, editor at Retro Cars magazine, said models from this generation are becoming increasingly popular with younger drivers who want to embrace the era, making it vital for prime examples to be well retained.

The supply of cars is a lot worse than it is or was for classics of an earlier vintage 

 

Craig Cheetham, editor at Retro Cars

He added: ‘The supply of cars is a lot worse than it is or was for classics of an earlier vintage thanks to a generational shift in society, which has seen a car become as much of a disposable asset as a washing machine.

‘In the eighties and nineties the days of ‘make good and mend’ turned into ‘finance and replace’, not helped by the scrappage scheme launched in 2009, and in the future the everyday cars of this era will be far less common than classic MGBs or Triumphs. 

‘Indeed, in many cases they already are.

‘That’s why it’s essential that the good ones get saved.’ 

Fancy a blast from the past in the Nissan Bluebird? There aren't many to choose from now, with 324 examples nearing the scrapyard

Fancy a blast from the past in the Nissan Bluebird? There aren’t many to choose from now, with 324 examples nearing the scrapyard

It was not ever earmarked as the most collectible Volvo ever, but the 440 is starting to run thin. In fact, there are fewer than its namesake in existence (407)

It was not ever earmarked as the most collectible Volvo ever, but the 440 is starting to run thin. In fact, there are fewer than its namesake in existence (407)

We could only manage to track down a picture of a Peugeot 309 in GTi spec - and we're not apologising for this. Some 409 examples in total are still in use (or SORN) in the UK

We could only manage to track down a picture of a Peugeot 309 in GTi spec – and we’re not apologising for this. Some 409 examples in total are still in use (or SORN) in the UK

The Rover 800 rounds-out the top 10 popular models from the '80s and '90s that are in terminal decline. Just over half its namesake (468 examples) are still in UK ownership

The Rover 800 rounds-out the top 10 popular models from the ’80s and ’90s that are in terminal decline. Just over half its namesake (468 examples) are still in UK ownership

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Baby died after medics turned his mother in labour because they were not enough beds, inquest hears 


A baby boy died after his mother was turned away from a maternity unit while in labour because there were not enough beds, an inquest was told.

Archie Batten’s mother was denied care at Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother Hospital in Margate, Kent and told to drive 38 miles to the William Harvey Hospital in Ashford.

The mother-to-be returned home and started to give birth alongside midwives who assisted, but according to the family’s lawyer, offered a ‘poor quality of care.’

Baby Archie died on September 1 last year shortly after birth.

The details emerged at a pre-inquest review at Archbishop’s Palace in Maidstone, Kent.

Archie Batten's mother was denied care at Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother Hospital in Margate, Kent (pictured) and told to drive 38 miles to the William Harvey Hospital in Ashford

Archie Batten’s mother was denied care at Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother Hospital in Margate, Kent (pictured) and told to drive 38 miles to the William Harvey Hospital in Ashford

During proceedings, the family’s lawyer said Archie’s mother should never have been sent away from the Margate unit, which had gone into ‘divert’ mode due to lack of beds so was not taking in any more patients.

Nick Fairweather said: ‘At 2.35pm, when she was turned away from hospital she was told she could access services at any time if needed.’

On her return at 4.50pm, he said she was told the hospital was in shutdown.

The lawyer added: ‘She should never have been sent away in the first place.’

He also criticised the quality of care by the four midwives that assisted Archie’s mother at home.

Mr Fairweather said: ‘What they failed to do was so fundamental they were not providing a meaningful service at all.’

Assistant coroner Sonia Hayes said the Root Cause Analysis (RCA) investigation found she should not have been sent home in the first place (pictured: Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother Hospital in Margate)

Assistant coroner Sonia Hayes said the Root Cause Analysis (RCA) investigation found she should not have been sent home in the first place (pictured: Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother Hospital in Margate)

 Assistant coroner Sonia Hayes said the Root Cause Analysis (RCA) investigation found she should not have been sent home in the first place (pictured: Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother Hospital in Margate)

Assistant coroner Sonia Hayes said the Root Cause Analysis (RCA) investigation found she should not have been sent home in the first place.

She added: ‘If she hadn’t had been, the ”divert” wouldn’t have affected her.’

It was also heard there was incomplete record-keeping during her labour.

A full inquest is expected in the coming months and the coroner is considering whether to hold an Article 2 inquest, which is an enhanced hearing possibly with a jury.

She criticised the trust for failing to submit documents in time, including Archie’s medical notes and an up-to-date full disclosure document.

Archie’s inquest follows that of baby Harry Richford in January in which a coroner found his death was ‘wholly avoidable.’

Harry was born at the QEQM on November 2, 2017, after a long labour and chaotic delivery by emergency caesarean, performed by an inexperienced locum.

Archie's inquest follows that of baby Harry Richford in January in which a coroner found his death was 'wholly avoidable'. Sarah and Tom Richford are pictrued with their son Harry

Archie's inquest follows that of baby Harry Richford in January in which a coroner found his death was 'wholly avoidable'. Sarah and Tom Richford are pictrued with their son Harry

Archie’s inquest follows that of baby Harry Richford in January in which a coroner found his death was ‘wholly avoidable’. Sarah and Tom Richford are pictrued with their son Harry

When he was eventually delivered, it took medics almost half an hour to resuscitate him.

It left him so unwell that he had to be transferred to the neonatal intensive care unit at the William Harvey Hospital in Ashford.

The coroner said the baby boy would have lived if it had not been for the hospital’s failures.

He set out 19 recommendations for improvements in a report published in full on Monday.

An independent inquiry is being held into maternity services at East Kent NHS Foundation Trust after it emerged there has been as many as 15 preventable baby deaths under their services.

The troubled trust has brought in maternity experts, including midwives and obstetricians, to effect ‘imminent improvements.’

A Trust spokesman said: ‘We know that we have not always provided the standard of care for every woman and baby that they expected and deserved, and wholeheartedly apologise to every one of those families we have let down.

‘We are taking all necessary steps to provide safe care and we are treating the recently raised concerns about the safety of our service with the utmost seriousness and urgency.

They added: ‘This includes making use of support from leading maternity experts, who have already identified further improvements that we will make.

‘We recognise that the change needed in our maternity service has not taken place quickly enough, and we are doing everything we can to improve our culture so that we become an organisation which is constantly learning and improving.’

Ecuador’s ‘Throat of Fire’ volcano heading towards a devastating ‘potential collapse’


Ecuador’s ‘Throat of Fire’ volcano heading towards a devastating ‘potential collapse’, scientists fear

  • The west face of Tungurahua is slowly deforming, satellite data has revealed
  • This instability could lead to a colossal landslide of material onto the local area
  • When Tungurahua erupted in 1999, 25,000 people were evacuated from nearby
  • A collapse of the west face 3,000 years ago covered 30.9 square miles in debris

Ecuador’s Tungurahua (‘Throat of Fire’) volcano is showing the hallmarks of being headed towards a devastating ‘potential collapse’, geologists warn.

The active volcano — known locally as ‘The Black Giant’ — appears to be developing an unstable western side, or ‘flank’, which could lead to a colossal landslide.

Such a collapse could cause widespread damage in the surrounding area — which includes Baños de Agua Santa, the second most populous city in the region.

Researchers are recommending that Tungurahua be closely monitored to keep an eye out for signs of an imminent flank collapse.

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Ecuador's Tungurahua ('Throat of Fire') volcano is showing the hallmarks of being headed towards a devastating 'potential collapse', geologists warn. The active volcano appears to be developing an unstable western side, or 'flank', which could lead to a colossal landslide

Ecuador’s Tungurahua (‘Throat of Fire’) volcano is showing the hallmarks of being headed towards a devastating ‘potential collapse’, geologists warn. The active volcano appears to be developing an unstable western side, or ‘flank’, which could lead to a colossal landslide

TUNGURAHUA STATS 

Location: central Ecuador

Meaning of name: ‘Throat of Fire’

Volcano type: Stratovolcano

Last eruption: 2000–2018

Height: 16,480 feet above sea level

Pictured, Tungurahua smoking in 2010

Pictured, Tungurahua smoking in 2010

Pictured, Tungurahua smoking in 2010

Geophysicist James Hickey of the University of Exeter and colleagues have been studying the changes to the volcano.

‘Using satellite data we have observed very rapid deformation of Tungurahua’s west flank, which our research suggests is caused by imbalances between magma being supplied and magma being erupted,’ he said. 

The team suggest that the deformation can be explained by the temporary storage of magma at shallow depths beneath the volcano’s weakened west flank.

If magma continues to be supplied to this reservoir, the mounting stress in the volcanic core could cause the west flank to grow unstable and collapse.

‘Magma supply is one of a number of factors that can cause or contribute to volcanic flank instability,’ explained Dr Hickey.

‘So while there is a risk of possible flank collapse, the uncertainty of these natural systems also means it could remain stable.

‘However, it’s definitely one to keep an eye on in the future.’

Such a collapse could cause widespread damage in the surrounding area — which includes Baños de Agua Santa, the second most populous city in the region. Pictured, Tungurahua

Such a collapse could cause widespread damage in the surrounding area — which includes Baños de Agua Santa, the second most populous city in the region. Pictured, Tungurahua

Such a collapse could cause widespread damage in the surrounding area — which includes Baños de Agua Santa, the second most populous city in the region. Pictured, Tungurahua

The team suggest that the deformation can be explained by the temporary storage of magma at shallow depths beneath the volcano's weakened west flank. If magma continues to be supplied to this reservoir, the stress in the volcanic core could cause the west flank to collapse

The team suggest that the deformation can be explained by the temporary storage of magma at shallow depths beneath the volcano's weakened west flank. If magma continues to be supplied to this reservoir, the stress in the volcanic core could cause the west flank to collapse

The team suggest that the deformation can be explained by the temporary storage of magma at shallow depths beneath the volcano’s weakened west flank. If magma continues to be supplied to this reservoir, the stress in the volcanic core could cause the west flank to collapse

Tungurahua — which has been active now since 1999, when an eruption (pictured) forced the evacuation of around 25,000 people from the surrounding area — has had a long history of undergoing flank collapse

Tungurahua — which has been active now since 1999, when an eruption (pictured) forced the evacuation of around 25,000 people from the surrounding area — has had a long history of undergoing flank collapse

Tungurahua — which has been active now since 1999, when an eruption (pictured) forced the evacuation of around 25,000 people from the surrounding area — has had a long history of undergoing flank collapse

Tungurahua — which has been active now since 1999, when an eruption forced the evacuation of around 25,000 people from the surrounding area — has had a long history of undergoing flank collapse.

An eruption of Tungurahua some 3,000 years ago led to a partial collapse of the west flank of volcanic cone the time.

This event is believed to have covered around 30.9 square miles (80 square kilometres) — the equivalent of some 11,000 football pitches — in an avalanche of rock, soil, snow and water.

Since this eruption, the volcano has steadily rebuilt itself, forming a steep-sided cone with a peak reaching some 16,480 feet (5,023 metres) above sea level — the west flank of which now shows signs of collapsing as it did three millennia ago.

The full findings of the study were published in the journal Earth & Planetary Science Letters. 

The active volcano — known locally as 'The Black Giant' — appears to be developing an unstable western side, or 'flank', which could lead to a colossal landslide. Such a collapse could cause widespread damage in the surrounding area — which includes Baños de Agua Santa, the second most populous city in the region

The active volcano — known locally as 'The Black Giant' — appears to be developing an unstable western side, or 'flank', which could lead to a colossal landslide. Such a collapse could cause widespread damage in the surrounding area — which includes Baños de Agua Santa, the second most populous city in the region

The active volcano — known locally as ‘The Black Giant’ — appears to be developing an unstable western side, or ‘flank’, which could lead to a colossal landslide. Such a collapse could cause widespread damage in the surrounding area — which includes Baños de Agua Santa, the second most populous city in the region

Eating a big breakfast could help you burn DOUBLE the amount of calories than a large dinner


Eating a big breakfast could help you burn DOUBLE the amount of calories ‘because it boosts the metabolism more than a large dinner’

  • A big breakfast could be the key to losing weight, researchers in Germany said
  • Their study found filling up in the morning boosts a metabolism process 
  • Diet-induced thermogenesis was shown to be twice as high in breakfast eaters
  • In contrast, a low calorie breakfast increases appetite, especially for sweets  

Eating a big breakfast could help you burn double the amount of calories than if you eat a larger meal at dinner.

It could be the key to losing weight while also keeping blood sugar levels steady, researchers at Lubeck University in Germany said.

Their study found filling up in the morning boosts a metabolism process known as diet-induced thermogenesis (DIT).

DIT refers to the number of calories the body expends to heat the body and digest food. It was shown to be twice as high for those who ate more at breakfast than at dinner.

On the other hand, a low calorie breakfast increases appetite, especially for sweets, the researchers said.

Eating a big breakfast could help you burn double the amount of calories than if you eat a larger meal at dinner, a study at Lubeck University in Germany suggests

Eating a big breakfast could help you burn double the amount of calories than if you eat a larger meal at dinner, a study at Lubeck University in Germany suggests

The findings published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism were based on a laboratory experiment of 16 men.

They consumed a low and high calorie breakfast and dinner one day – and then vice versa on another.

DIT was 2.5 times higher when the high calorie meal was eaten in the morning than in the evening.

DIT is the body’s way of heating in order to support digestion and transport of blood when eating. Different foods and meal times affect how many calories are used by the body to do it.

The study also showed increases blood sugar and insulin concentrations, caused by eating a meal, was diminished after breakfast, but not so much after dinner. 

WHAT IS DIET-INDUCED THERMOGENESIS?

Diet-induced thermogenesis is when the body produces heat after eating, also called the thermic effect of food.

After eating, the body expends more energy for a few hours in order to support digestion, transport of blood and nutrient absorption.

How much DIT is required will depend on the size of the meal and time of day it is eaten. Some foods require more thermic response than others, studies have found.

Thermic activity is thought to aid weight loss because it is a measure of how well the metabolism is working.

There is some evidence to suggest obese people have lower DIT response, suggesting they carry more weight because their DIT or metabolism is dampened.

The results also showed eating a low-calorie breakfast caused sweet cravings with a higher appetite. 

This suggests those saving all their calories for the end of the day may face consequences because they snack more.

Corresponding author Dr Juliane Richter said: ‘Our results show a meal eaten for breakfast – regardless of the amount of calories it contains – creates twice as high diet-induced thermogenesis as the same meal consumed for dinner.

‘This finding is significant for all people as it underlines the value of eating enough at breakfast.’

The study adds to increasing evidence that the best way of losing weight is to eat your largest meal in the morning – and your smallest in the evening.

Dr Richter, a neurobiologist at Lubeck University, said: ‘Eating more at breakfast instead of dinner could prevent obesity and high blood sugar.’

Both obesity and high blood sugar can lead to a host of life-threatening illnesses including cancer, cardiovascular disease and diabetes.

Previous research has shown DIT is lower in people with obesity. It’s seen as a measure of how well our metabolism is working.

DIT can differ depending on mealtime and is generally slower in the evening and at night due to our body clocks. 

Dr Richter said: ‘We recommend that patients with obesity as well as healthy people eat a large breakfast rather than a large dinner to reduce body weight and prevent metabolic diseases.’

Eating a large breakfast has long been thought to help prevent weight gain. 

A 2017 study of over 50,000 adults, which found eating a big breakfast, medium lunch and small dinner led to lower BMIs (body mass indexes).

The US and Czech nutritionists tracked the participants for seven years and discovered eating the largest meal in the morning was among the most effective strategies for preventing long-term weight gain. 

Professor Daniela Jakubowicz, author of The Big Breakfast Diet, found that those who piled on the calories in the morning were more likely to feel satisfied, preventing snacking throughout the day.

And another study by Professor Jakubowicz found that eating chocolate in the morning, when our metabolism is at its highest, prevented cravings for sweet things later on.

WHAT IS THE BEST SIZE OF BREAKFAST, LUNCH AND DINNER FOR WEIGHT LOSS?

A blow out breakfast, a medium lunch and small dinner may be the best combination for those suffering from diabetes or obesity, research suggested in March 2018.

Obese diabetes patients following such a diet lose 11lbs (5kg) over three months compared to a 3lb (1.4kg) weight gain for those eating the traditionally recommended weight-loss plan of six small meals a day, a study found.

Sticking to just three meals a day of varying sizes also reduces diabetics’ glucose levels and insulin requirements, as well as their hunger and carbohydrate cravings, the research adds.

Lead author Dr Daniela Jakubowicz, from Tel Aviv University, said: ‘The hour of the day — when you eat and how frequently you eat — is more important than what you eat and how many calories you eat.

‘Our body metabolism changes throughout the day.

‘A slice of bread consumed at breakfast leads to a lower glucose response and is less fattening than an identical slice of bread consumed in the evening.’ 

Results further suggest fasting glucose levels decrease by 54 mg/dl (from 161 to 107) in those eating three meals a day group compared to only 23 mg/dl (from 164 to 141) in those consuming six.

Healthy levels are considered to be less than 108 mg/dl. 

Having breakfast as the main meal of the day also significantly reduces the need for insulin by -20.5 units/day (from 54.7 to 34.8) compared to those spread out throughout the day, which requires people have 2.2 more units a day (from 67.8 to 70).

Overall amounts of glucose in the blood are also lower just 14 days after adopting a three meal a day eating plan.

Boeing finds a new issue with Max, debris in fuel tanks


New Boeing safety fears as potentially catastrophic DEBRIS is found in the engines of ‘several’ undelivered Boeing 737 Max jets which were grounded after fatal crashes

  • A Boeing official said that debris was discovered in ‘several’ 737 Max jets  
  • They have a stock of 400 undelivered jets due to a temporary production halt 
  • The fuel tank debris was discovered during maintenance on parked plane 

Boeing was hit by new safety fears on Tuesday after the company admitted that it had found debris inside the fuel tanks of some of its 737 Max jets. 

The ‘foreign objects’ were found in the tanks of the planes that have been grounded at Boeing’s production plant after the 737 MAX 8 was grounded last year following two deadly crashes that killed 346 people. 

The planes were grounded after investigators found that the model’s new flight software and a lack of training for pilots confused pilots and led to the crash of Lion Air flight 610 in Indonesia and Ethiopian Airlines flight 302.  

A Boeing official said the debris was discovered in ‘several’ of the grounded planes, but did not give a precise number. Boeing built about 400 undelivered Max jets before it temporarily halted production last month.

The fuel tank debris was discovered during maintenance on parked planes, and Boeing said it immediately made corrections in its production system to prevent a recurrence. Those steps include more inspections before fuel tanks are sealed.

In this 11 December, 2019, file photo, a United Airlines Boeing 737 Max airplane takes off in the rain at Renton Municipal Airport in Renton, Wash.

In this 11 December, 2019, file photo, a United Airlines Boeing 737 Max airplane takes off in the rain at Renton Municipal Airport in Renton, Wash.

Rescuers work at the scene of an Ethiopian Airlines flight crash in March 2019 which caused Boeing to ground its popular 737 Max aircraft to investigate its link with the crash

Rescuers work at the scene of an Ethiopian Airlines flight crash in March 2019 which caused Boeing to ground its popular 737 Max aircraft to investigate its link with the crash

Rescuers work at the scene of an Ethiopian Airlines flight crash in March 2019 which caused Boeing to ground its popular 737 Max aircraft to investigate its link with the crash

A Boeing spokesman said that the issue would not change the company´s belief that the Federal Aviation Administration will certify the plane to fly again this summer.

An FAA spokesman said the agency knows that Boeing is conducting a voluntary inspection of undelivered Max planes.

The FAA ‘increased its surveillance based on initial inspection reports and will take further action based on the findings,’ said spokesman Lynn Lunsford. 

Metal shavings, tools and other objects left in planes during assembly can raise the risk of electrical short-circuiting and fires.

Mark Jenks, Boeing´s general manager of the 737 program, said in a memo to employees who work on the 737, ‘During these challenging times, our customers and the flying public are counting on us to do our best work each and every day.’

Jenks called the debris ‘absolutely unacceptable. One escape is one too many.’

The Federal Aviation Administration at 600 Independence Avenue in Washington,DC - messages released by Boeing appear to show employees deceiving the FAA over safety issues

The Federal Aviation Administration at 600 Independence Avenue in Washington,DC - messages released by Boeing appear to show employees deceiving the FAA over safety issues

The Federal Aviation Administration at 600 Independence Avenue in Washington,DC – messages released by Boeing appear to show employees deceiving the FAA over safety issues

A graphic shows the dimensions of the Boeing's 737 Max model

A graphic shows the dimensions of the Boeing's 737 Max model

A graphic shows the dimensions of the Boeing’s 737 Max model 

A graphic shows Boeing's 737 Max maneuvering characteristics augmentation system

A graphic shows Boeing's 737 Max maneuvering characteristics augmentation system

A graphic shows Boeing’s 737 Max maneuvering characteristics augmentation system

The debris issue was first reported by aviation news site Leehamnews.com.

Max jets were grounded around the world last March after two crashes killed 346 people. 

Boeing is conducting test flights to assess updates to a flight-control system that activated before the crashes on faulty signals from sensors outside the plane, pushing the noses of the aircraft down and triggering spirals that pilots were unable to stop.

While investigators examining the Max accidents have not pointed to production problems at the assembly plant near Seattle, Boeing has faced concerns about debris left in other finished planes including the 787 Dreamliner, which is built in South Carolina.

‘Out-dated’ judge faces having cases reviewed


‘Out-dated’ judge who rejected rape claim because woman did ‘nothing physically to stop attack’ faces calls to have his cases reviewed after joint letter from 130 lawyers and campaigners

  • Letter signed by 130 lawyers and women’s rights groups calling for review
  • They want Judge Robin Tolson’s continuing cases to come under review
  • He was criticised for his handling of a case of mother who said she’d been raped

More than 130 lawyers and women’s rights groups have today signed a letter calling for a review of a judge who dismissed a woman’s rape claim because she did not fight back against her alleged attacker.   

Judge Robin Tolson QC was criticised for his handling of a case which saw a woman lose custody of her son, despite telling the courts the child’s father had subjected her to domestic and sexual abuse. 

Judge Tolson said he was concerned that ‘the mother did nothing physically to stop the father [from raping] her’.

He said that the mother should have stopped the father from having sex with her by ‘refusing to remove her pyjama bottoms.’

Last month he was savaged by a senior colleague and now, more than 130 legal experts and campaigners have called for an urgent review of all of Judge Tolsons’ active cases, according to BBC’s Victoria Derbyshire show. 

More than 130 lawyers and women's rights groups have today signed a letter calling for a review of Judge Robin Tolson

More than 130 lawyers and women’s rights groups have today signed a letter calling for a review of Judge Robin Tolson  

The letter, signed by organisations including Rape Crisis England and Wales, Women’s Aid and the Centre for Women’s Justice, claims that family court judges hold ‘outdated views’ and should be trained on the ‘meaning of consent’. 

It adds attitudes such as those expressed by the judge ‘leave children and women at risk of serious harm’. 

Judge Tolson QC last year oversaw a case which saw a 29-year-old father with a string of criminal convictions for violence and theft, and a long record of abuse against previous domestic partners, ask for contact with his son. 

He and the boy’s mother had separated more than three years ago and the child remained with his mother, judges heard.

Family court litigation began after the man asked to be allowed to spend time with his son, but the woman objected and said the man had been controlling and had raped her. 

Judge Tolson found that although the mother was ‘both upset and averse’ to sex, ‘the sex between the parties carried the consent of both’. He concluded: ‘This was not rape.’

The woman argued the judge’s approach had led to her losing the legal battle with the man. 

But she has since had her appeal upheld by a High Court judge, over its handling. 

The Victoria Derbyshire show also heard of another woman whose case was heard by Judge Tolson. 

She said she left her partner when he subjected her and her children to physical abuse – but he applied to the courts for contact and was granted access. 

She claims her younger child is ‘terrified of going for contact with [the father] and says he’s been physically abusive’.

But ‘Trish’ cannot stop her child seeing the father – or she will face a fine, or jail time. 

She told the show: ‘All I want is for this to be properly investigated. I’ve been in court at least 20 times. [The father] can afford lawyers but… I have to represent myself.

‘He’s continuing to control me and abuse – and that’s enabled by the courts.

‘The children’s voices are not heard and to not even have the courts protecting vulnerable families is really scary.

‘I am deeply concerned for the future of my children and their safety.’

The High Court (pictured above) allowed the woman to appeal the decision made by Judge Tolson

The High Court (pictured above) allowed the woman to appeal the decision made by Judge Tolson

The High Court (pictured above) allowed the woman to appeal the decision made by Judge Tolson

Last month, Judge Tolson was severely criticised by High Court judge Ms Justice Russell (pictured), who indicated in a written ruling that her colleagues needed to receive training on the 'appropriate' way to deal with allegations of serious assault

Last month, Judge Tolson was severely criticised by High Court judge Ms Justice Russell (pictured), who indicated in a written ruling that her colleagues needed to receive training on the 'appropriate' way to deal with allegations of serious assault

Last month, Judge Tolson was severely criticised by High Court judge Ms Justice Russell (pictured), who indicated in a written ruling that her colleagues needed to receive training on the ‘appropriate’ way to deal with allegations of serious assault

Last month, Judge Tolson was severely criticised by High Court judge Ms Justice Russell, who said he had made ‘multiple errors of law’ and that his judgement was ‘so flawed as to require a retrial’. 

Ms Justice Russell said that in future family judges will get extra training on the law governing rape and sexual assault to match that given to judges who sit in serious sex cases in the criminal courts.

The High Court judge said that Judge Tolson had ignored 15 years of progress in rape law and the legal approach to consent in sex. 

Floods inspire ‘Dunkirk spirit’: Locals rally round to help families forced out of their homes


Flood-hit residents and workers praised the ‘Dunkirk spirit’ in Britain following Storm Dennis as communities rallied to help those worst affected today.

Among the worst hit areas was Ironbridge in Shropshire where residents are beginning the clear up after the River Severn peaked last night, with the town’s flood defences holding firm against the onslaught

Up to 1,500 properties have been flooded in the past few days with thousands more evacuated – but spirits were high in the former industrial town near Telford today with the river level expected to go down.

Vic Haddock, 60, in his canoe in Ironbridge today, said: "I've lived here for 17 years and this has been the worst it's ever been'

Vic Haddock, 60, in his canoe in Ironbridge today, said: ‘I’ve lived here for 17 years and this has been the worst it’s ever been’

Pictured are donations, including heaps of children's cuddly toys, for flood victims at Treforest community centre in Wales

Pictured are donations, including heaps of children's cuddly toys, for flood victims at Treforest community centre in Wales

Pictured are donations, including heaps of children’s cuddly toys, for flood victims at Treforest community centre in Wales

Welsh First Minister Mark Drakeford (centre) and Member of the Welsh Assembly for Pontypridd, Mick Antoniw (right), with resident Caroline Jones inspecting flood damage at her house in Oxford Street, Nantgarw, in south Wales, on Monday

Welsh First Minister Mark Drakeford (centre) and Member of the Welsh Assembly for Pontypridd, Mick Antoniw (right), with resident Caroline Jones inspecting flood damage at her house in Oxford Street, Nantgarw, in south Wales, on Monday

Welsh First Minister Mark Drakeford (centre) and Member of the Welsh Assembly for Pontypridd, Mick Antoniw (right), with resident Caroline Jones inspecting flood damage at her house in Oxford Street, Nantgarw, in south Wales, on Monday

Ironbridge resident Pete Andrews, 50, with his dog Pippin, said today: 'It was a lot better last night. We weren't scared at all'

Ironbridge resident Pete Andrews, 50, with his dog Pippin, said today: 'It was a lot better last night. We weren't scared at all'

Ironbridge resident Pete Andrews, 50, with his dog Pippin, said today: ‘It was a lot better last night. We weren’t scared at all’

Mike Perks, manager of Cleo’s wine and cocktail bar said: ‘We got told we would have to be here all through the night. Then we were told that the water had dropped.

‘Yesterday we were full of people and the council workers who were here seemed relieved that the water was going down. The community has really pulled together.

‘It would have been awful if it had been a tragedy. The next step is the clear up. We just hope everyone is alright.’

Mr Perks has had as many as 40 people in at the busiest point to take shelter and refuel with complimentary teas and coffees. 

He said yesterday: ‘We’ve got people drinking teas and coffees and having bacon sandwiches and everything else – the old Dunkirk spirit.’

Dr Ann Henshaw, 73, lives in a cottage directly next to the River Severn by the eponymous Ironbridge. She said today: ‘We’ve been fine. I’ve had lots and lots of calls and offers of help from friends. It was touch and go last night.

Vic Haddock outside his canoe hire business in Ironbridge today while neighbour Pete Andrews pumps out water

Vic Haddock outside his canoe hire business in Ironbridge today while neighbour Pete Andrews pumps out water

Vic Haddock outside his canoe hire business in Ironbridge today while neighbour Pete Andrews pumps out water

Appliciances have been placed on stools in Vic Haddock's house in Ironbridge today as the flooding problems today

Appliciances have been placed on stools in Vic Haddock's house in Ironbridge today as the flooding problems today

Appliciances have been placed on stools in Vic Haddock’s house in Ironbridge today as the flooding problems today

Flooded homes on the banks of the River Severn in the Shropshire former industrial town of Ironbridge today

Flooded homes on the banks of the River Severn in the Shropshire former industrial town of Ironbridge today

Flooded homes on the banks of the River Severn in the Shropshire former industrial town of Ironbridge today

Furniture has been moved off the floor in Vic Haddock's home in Ironbridge today as the area faces flooding chaos

Furniture has been moved off the floor in Vic Haddock's home in Ironbridge today as the area faces flooding chaos

Furniture has been moved off the floor in Vic Haddock’s home in Ironbridge today as the area faces flooding chaos

Among the worst hit areas is Ironbridge where residents are beginning the clear up today after the River Severn peaked

Among the worst hit areas is Ironbridge where residents are beginning the clear up today after the River Severn peaked

Among the worst hit areas is Ironbridge where residents are beginning the clear up today after the River Severn peaked

‘I had to disable all the downstairs electrics which meant it was a bit cold. It hasn’t been great, it’s been the worst it’s been since 2000.

‘I’m just relieved the water has gone down. My garden is flooded. The water isn’t bad for it at all, in fact it’s probably good for it with all those minerals.’

Residents in Ladywood which is directly next to River Severn and the iconic Ironbridge are beginning the clear up after their homes flooded. Pete Andrews, 50, said: ‘It was a lot better last night. We weren’t scared at all.’

Residents in the area hit out at the council for not installing flood defences on their side of the river.

Vic Haddock, 60, said: ‘I’ve lived here for 17 years and this has been the worst it’s ever been. Nobody can control the weather and if you live by a river then you can expect to get wet.’

He added that despite the flood barriers put in by the council on the nearby Wharfage, residents in Ladywood had been given no such protection.

Robert Price, 53, faces a bill of thousands after his grade-II listed 15th century cottage Ironbridge was flooded today

Robert Price, 53, faces a bill of thousands after his grade-II listed 15th century cottage Ironbridge was flooded today

Robert Price, 53, faces a bill of thousands after his grade-II listed 15th century cottage Ironbridge was flooded today

Robert Price in Ironbridge claimed that the water had peaked higher than the Environment Agency had predicted at 21ft

Robert Price in Ironbridge claimed that the water had peaked higher than the Environment Agency had predicted at 21ft

Robert Price in Ironbridge claimed that the water had peaked higher than the Environment Agency had predicted at 21ft

The flood-hit interior of Rob Price's home on the banks of the River Severn in Ironbridge today

The flood-hit interior of Rob Price's home on the banks of the River Severn in Ironbridge today

The flood-hit interior of Rob Price’s home on the banks of the River Severn in Ironbridge today

DVDs and electrical equipment has been stacked as high as possible at Robert Price's home in Ironbridge today

DVDs and electrical equipment has been stacked as high as possible at Robert Price's home in Ironbridge today

DVDs and electrical equipment has been stacked as high as possible at Robert Price’s home in Ironbridge today

He said: ‘Over here were not told anything. We don’t have flood barriers over here. I had to spend last night with my family in Wolverhampton. Right now we have no gas, no electricity and no amentities. It’s going to cost thousands to put it right.’

Robert Price, 53, faces a bill of thousands after his grade two 15th century cottage was flooded.

He claimed that the water had peaked higher than the Environment Agency had predicted at 6.52 metres and that the flood would cost him thousands of pounds in damage.

He said: ‘This is the worst it’s ever been without a doubt. I feel like we’ve been let down. The frustrating thing is that this is a grade 2 listed building and we have to go through hoops to get anything done.

‘Since we’ve lived here we knew that something like this would happen. The council put up flood defences on the other side of the river, not here. It’s going to cost us thousands to repair.’

Debbie Kane said: ‘Last night was OK. Monday night was terrible. We were up all night manning the pumps. We’re a nice little community down here, we look after ourselves.

‘We were told it was be five metres high and we were updated by text and checked hourly. We had sandbags and pumps ready.’ 

Flooded cottages in Monmouth in the aftermath of Storm Dennis yesterday

Flooded cottages in Monmouth in the aftermath of Storm Dennis yesterday

Flooded cottages in Monmouth in the aftermath of Storm Dennis yesterday

Some 30 properties were evacuated on the Wharfage in Ironbridge yesterday morning as a danger to life warning was issued.

Elsewhere in the country, Pontypridd in Wales was battered by Storm Dennis over the weekend, but as families were left without homes, strangers were quick to offer their help, and a small community centre was overwhelmed with donations to help those affected.

A small group at Treforest Community Centre, dubbed the ‘unsung heroes’, put together plans to get people aid.  

Secretary of the centre, Cheryl Jarman, 58, explained they decided to ask people who were willing to donate unwanted items to help those who had lost everything in the floods.

A post was published on social media and the centre has had thousands of donations including household items, food, toiletries, and stuffed toys for displaced children.   

Mrs Jarman said: ‘We have had a back up of bags this week as donations keep coming through the door.

‘I’ve never seen anything like this at all. We’ve had things for babies, prams, clothes, toiletries – anything you can think of.

‘We have been overwhelmed by the reaction here.’

People have even donated beds, TVs, and Sky boxes. Transit vans were delivering toiletries and baby supplies, along with boxes of fresh fruit and daffodils.

On Monday Mrs Jarman opened up at around 9am thinking she’d be there for 10 minutes to speak to an electrician.

She didn’t leave until 10.20pm because people kept arriving bringing donated goods through the door.

A member of the public wades through floodwaters after flooding in Nantgarw, Wales as Storm Dennis hit on Sunday

A member of the public wades through floodwaters after flooding in Nantgarw, Wales as Storm Dennis hit on Sunday

A member of the public wades through floodwaters after flooding in Nantgarw, Wales as Storm Dennis hit on Sunday

A man rides a bike through flood water, as pumps and flood barriers help to keep the water from flooding homes in Gloucester Road in Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, today

A man rides a bike through flood water, as pumps and flood barriers help to keep the water from flooding homes in Gloucester Road in Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, today

A man rides a bike through flood water, as pumps and flood barriers help to keep the water from flooding homes in Gloucester Road in Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, today

The centre has received so much it’s sending some to other venues like Trallwn Community Centre and Hapi Hub in Rhydyfelin to make sure all communities have enough to go around.

‘We just want to say how thankful we are,’ said Mrs Jarman. ‘Can we just say how grateful we are for the generosity of others.

‘There was a two-year-old here this morning and it broke her little heart – she has nothing.

‘We are trying to help people and they’re saying ‘give it to someone who needs it’, and they have nothing.

‘People are proud and they don’t want to take anything.’  

Churches in Pontypridd also opened their doors to offer refuge to those left stranded by the deluge. 

Families living along the River Severn were evacuated from their homes as a city braced itself for its highest flood levels since 2014.

A woman and child enter a cottage today in Gloucester Road in Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, as pumps and flood barriers help to keep the water from flooding the properties

A woman and child enter a cottage today in Gloucester Road in Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, as pumps and flood barriers help to keep the water from flooding the properties

A woman and child enter a cottage today in Gloucester Road in Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, as pumps and flood barriers help to keep the water from flooding the properties

Aerial view of Upton-upon-Severn this morning where residents are still on high alert as the town sits surrounded by water

Aerial view of Upton-upon-Severn this morning where residents are still on high alert as the town sits surrounded by water

Aerial view of Upton-upon-Severn this morning where residents are still on high alert as the town sits surrounded by water

Residents in Hempsted and Alney Island, Gloucester, were told they were ‘at risk’ from the rising river levels, with some choosing to pack up and spend the night in a rest centre.

Red flood warnings remain in place along the Severn with new predictions that water levels could top 4.5m in Gloucester, just 42cm shy of the 2007 peak.

In 2014, the last time homes were evacuated, flood defences held and the area on the far side of Westgate Bridge was not flooded.

Councillor Dawn Melvin has spent part of the evening in her ward as residents prepare for high tide at 3am.

She said the people of Alney Island have either ‘hunkered down’ or evacuated their homes.

Cllr Melvin said: ‘People were evacuating, but all I will say is many of those people are the salt of the earth. They are so resilient, it’s frightening.

‘Even ones with small babies have been putting their furniture on anything they could to get it off the ground or moving everything to the first floor.’

Aerial view of Upton-upon-Severn this morning where residents are still on high alert as the town sits surrounded by water

Aerial view of Upton-upon-Severn this morning where residents are still on high alert as the town sits surrounded by water

Aerial view of Upton-upon-Severn this morning where residents are still on high alert as the town sits surrounded by water

Gloucestershire Police said officers had been out in at risk areas offering advice to residents.

A force spokesperson said: ‘People have been advised that they are at risk of flooding.

‘The neighbourhood team have been around advising and have told them they can go to the rescue centre at the GL1 Leisure Centre.’

Cllr Melvin added that ‘en masse people have been hunkering down’ and the community have been helping each other to move furniture and the like.

She went on to commend the ‘level of community in that area’ while the Environment Agency were pumping water out of the River Severn.

Cllr Melvin, who represents Westgate on Gloucester City Council, said: ‘People have been bringing out cups of tea and checking the Environment Agency have sandwiches.

‘Some of these people, God-willing, they will have lost nothing but they might and they probably all know that they might.’

Red flood warnings were issued for Alney Island, Gloucester, Hempsted, Minsterworth and Stonebench, Sandhurst and Maisemore, and Trigworth and Longford.

Cannibal who murdered his Grindr date and ate his testicles is found unresponsive in his cell


Cannibal Mark Latunski was found unresponsive in his cell. He was taken to the hospital but is now in a stable condition and has been returned to custody

Cannibal Mark Latunski was found unresponsive in his cell. He was taken to the hospital but is now in a stable condition and has been returned to custody 

A cannibal who murdered his Grindr date before eating his testicles has been found unresponsive in his cell after barely eating since his arrest in December. 

Mark Latunski, 50, was found in his cell at Shiawassee County Jail, Michigan, at around 5pm Tuesday. 

It is unclear what caused him to pass out, but deputies were able to revive him with smelling salts. 

They then took him to the hospital as a precaution. 

‘We thought it was best to (have medical personnel) take a look at him,’ Shiawassee County Sheriff Brian BeGole told Michigan Live. 

He added that while his food intake has ‘been down’  

He noted Latunski’s food intake has been down since Friday ‘but not to the point we’d call it a hunger strike.’

In previous reports, the sheriff said he hadn’t eaten since he was booked in December. 

Latunski, a former chemist, confessed to killing 25-year-old hairstylist Kevin Bacon and then eating his body parts on Christmas Eve.  

He has not yet had his court date but a judge had accepted an insanity plea. 

In January, a judge ordered a mental health assessment to determine if he was fit to stand trial.  

It is unclear why he refused to eat.  

The gruesome events unfolded after the pair arranged to meet on dating app Grindr on December 24. 

Bacon’s naked body was found four days later on December 28 hanging upside down from the rafters of Latunski’s Michigan home by a rope tied around his ankles, after police went to conduct a welfare check for Bacon when they were tipped off that he may be inside.

The 25-year-old hairdresser was missing for four days before his body was discovered

The 25-year-old hairdresser was missing for four days before his body was discovered

The 25-year-old hairdresser was missing for four days before his body was discovered 

Latunski confessed to officers that he had killed his date by stabbing him in the back and then slitting his throat with a knife.

The suspect also confessed to cutting off Bacon’s testicles and eating them. 

It later emerged that two other men may have had a lucky escape from the suspected killer in the months leading up to Bacon’s death.

Just months before the gruesome murder, two men called police on separate occasions, saying they had escaped from Latunski’s basement. 

A horrifying 911 call from October emerged of a 40-year-old man who said he was running away from Latunski’s house. 

‘I want you to know like I’ve never ever had anything like this happen. I don’t know if he drugged me. All is know is I ended up locked up in the f***ing basement, okay? Chained in the basement,’ the male said.

The caller explained to the dispatcher that he ran into Latunski at a bus station that night. 

Bacon (above) went to meet Latunski on December 24

Bacon (above) went to meet Latunski on December 24

Latunski confessed to the murder and cannibalism

Latunski confessed to the murder and cannibalism

Bacon’s (left) naked body was found on December 28 hanging upside down from the rafters of Latunski’s (right) Michigan home by a rope tied around his ankles, after police went to conduct a welfare check for Bacon when they were tipped off that he may be inside

‘I met this guy. I’m Bi. He’s cute. He hit on me. I don’t know we went out to the car and talked. We went to the store, had a soda. I woke up in the basement,’ he said. ‘He seemed like a nice guy.’

The man told the 911 operator that he used a butcher knife he found in the basement to cut a leather strap restraining his ankles, which was connected to a chain, and then fled on foot.  

In a bizarre twist, the man later returned to Latunski’s home and stayed there for two or three days, according to the police. 

No charges were ever filed in that case. 

Two men made 911 calls saying they had escaped from his basement but charges were never filed

Two men made 911 calls saying they had escaped from his basement but charges were never filed

Two men made 911 calls saying they had escaped from his basement but charges were never filed

Then, in November, another man dialed 911 to report that he was running away from Latunski’s home.

The 29-year-old man called officers to report that he had been tied up in the suspect’s basement. 

‘I’m trying to get away from some creepy guy,’ the caller tells the dispatcher. ‘He had me tied in his basement.’

‘He’s after me.’

The victim sought help from a neighbor, while on the phone to police. 

Officers arrived on the scene just as Latunski turned up to retrieve the leather kilt the man was wearing, saying it was expensive and belonged to him.

The victim again declined to file charges against Latunski, telling police their activity was consensual. 

Police said they did not follow up on Latunski because both men declined to pursue charges against him.  

Latunski was taken to a local hospital at around 5:08 pm Tuesday, where he was kept under guard by officers, before he was returned to his cell later that night at around 9:45 pm. 

Latunski has been charged with murder and mutilation of a human body and is being held without bond. 

A judge ordered him to undergo a series of mental health evaluations in January, which could take up to three months.      

Stephen Fry admits he’s ‘sensitive’ to online trolling


‘It cuts you to the quick’: Stephen Fry admits he’s ‘sensitive’ to online trolling and has decided to no longer read tweets about him

The conversation about online trolling has never been more pertinent in light of Caroline Flack’s tragic suicide.

And Stephen Fry admitted nasty comments on Twitter are like a ‘lemon on a paper cut’ and have the power to completely ruin his day. 

The 62-year-old comedian and writer appeared on Wednesday’s installment of This Morning, discussing the negative effect social media can have on your mental health.

Honest: Stephen Fry admitted nasty comments on Twitter are like a 'lemon on a paper cut' during an appearance on This Morning on Wednesday

Honest: Stephen Fry admitted nasty comments on Twitter are like a ‘lemon on a paper cut’ during an appearance on This Morning on Wednesday

Stephen was chatting to hosts Ruth Langsford and Eamonn Holmes about his first album, The Mythos Suite, featuring original music from the star and composer Debbie Wiseman to accompany his vivid retelling of Greek myths and legends.

The conversation soon turned to mindfulness, with Ruth reminding him of the times the presenter – who boasts over 12.7million followers – has quit Twitter in the past. 

He explained: ‘I am very sensitive, it’s pathetic. But if you’re in the public eye, there’s always going to be people who don’t like you.

‘They have strong opinions on your personality – despite never having met you. “I hate so and so, they’re so up themselves’… 

‘You used to say it about your family in the kitchen, whereas now people type that quite breezily. And of course, some people actively enjoy hurting you. 

Tough: The 62-year-old comedian and writer chatted to Ruth Langsford and Eamonn Holmes, discussing the negative effect social media can have on your mental health

Tough: The 62-year-old comedian and writer chatted to Ruth Langsford and Eamonn Holmes, discussing the negative effect social media can have on your mental health

Tough: The 62-year-old comedian and writer chatted to Ruth Langsford and Eamonn Holmes, discussing the negative effect social media can have on your mental health

He explained: 'I am very sensitive, it's pathetic. But if you're in the public eye, there's always going to be people who don't like you'

He explained: 'I am very sensitive, it's pathetic. But if you're in the public eye, there's always going to be people who don't like you'

He explained: ‘I am very sensitive, it’s pathetic. But if you’re in the public eye, there’s always going to be people who don’t like you’

‘It cuts you to the quick, it’s like lemon on a paper cut – it ruins your day.’

Asked whether he was ever tempted to respond to some of the more hurtful comments, Stephen said he had learned to not read any of it.

‘I did respond occasionally, but you have to just not follow it or read it’, he said.

‘It’s also not particularly good for your soul if people are heaping praise on you. You have to try and be real about it’.

Stephen has been known to take long breaks from his social media account, including in 2016 after his BAFTA hosting gig when his ‘bag lady’ joke about costume designer Jenny Beavan backfired.

‘Think I may have to give up on Twitter. Too much aggression and unkindness around’, he also previously tweeted in 2009. 

Speaking out: The conversation about online trolling has never been more pertinent in light of Caroline Flack's tragic suicide last weekend

Speaking out: The conversation about online trolling has never been more pertinent in light of Caroline Flack's tragic suicide last weekend

Speaking out: The conversation about online trolling has never been more pertinent in light of Caroline Flack’s tragic suicide last weekend

Stephen has been vocal in the past about his struggles with mental health, admitting his ‘relentless’ battle with bipolar disorder is ‘incurable’.

Speaking in a BBC documentary, Stephen explained he had been diagnosed with psychothermia – which causes mood swings leading to disturbed behaviour – when he first started seeing the psychiatrist following his suicide attempt in Uganda in 2012.

He has since been diagnosed with bipolar one which can cause manic episodes of elevated high energy as well as periods of depression.

Elsewhere during the This Morning interview, Fry discussed his prostate cancer recovery, saying things are ‘good’ with his health at the moment.

The QI star was diagnosed with the disease at the end of 2017 and underwent an operation to have his prostate removed in February lasy uear.

He cheerfully said: ‘I’ve had the prostate out, fortunately things are good. You have to keep checking these things though.

‘It’s great that men of a certain age are speaking about it and going to the doctor. People should understand that it’s a very common cancer for men.’

In good health: Fry also discussed his prostate cancer recovery, saying things are 'good'

In good health: Fry also discussed his prostate cancer recovery, saying things are 'good'

In good health: Fry also discussed his prostate cancer recovery, saying things are ‘good’

Gruesome haul of plastic pulled from the innards of a young female green sea turtle found in Bali


Gruesome haul of plastic pulled from the innards of a young female green sea turtle that washed up dead on a Bali beach reveals the danger human litter poses to marine animals

  • WARNING: GRAPHIC CONTENT
  • The young female was found dead on a beach by surfers in Bali  
  • Locals investigating the carcass alerted experts to determine its cause of death  
  • Large pieces of plastic were found inside the animal which may have killed her  

A young sea turtle washed up dead on a Bali beach was filled with large pieces of plastic when she died. 

Images of the animal’s innards reveal pieces of plastic clogging up the intestines, blocking food and possibly poisoning the creature. 

Surfers on the beach found the animal and exerts later inspected its remains when they discovered the gruesome haul.  

Surfers on the beach found the dead animal and experts later inspected its remains when they discovered the gruesome haul

Surfers on the beach found the dead animal and experts later inspected its remains when they discovered the gruesome haul

Images of the animal's innards reveal pieces of plastic clogging up the intestines, blocking food and possibly poisoning the creature

Images of the animal's innards reveal pieces of plastic clogging up the intestines, blocking food and possibly poisoning the creature

Images of the animal’s innards reveal pieces of plastic clogging up the intestines, blocking food and possibly poisoning the creature

Runa Widemann from The Meadow Medewi Organization said that the young turtle had swallowed at least one plastic bag which had blocked her internal organs

Runa Widemann from The Meadow Medewi Organization said that the young turtle had swallowed at least one plastic bag which had blocked her internal organs

Runa Widemann from The Meadow Medewi Organization said that the young turtle had swallowed at least one plastic bag which had blocked her internal organs 

The scourge of human litter and plastic waste poses a huge threat to marine wildlife. 

Animals often mistake it for food and accidentally eat the floating waste.  

The lifeless creatures washed up on the shore on February 1 and marine workers checked the creatures digestive system. 

Runa Widemann from The Meadow Medewi Organization said that the young turtle had swallowed at least one plastic bag which had blocked her internal organs.

She said: ‘The turtle was already dead and we decided to open her up to see if we could find the cause of death.’

The lifeless creatures washed up on the shore on February 1 and marine workers checked the creatures digestive system for signs of plastic

The lifeless creatures washed up on the shore on February 1 and marine workers checked the creatures digestive system for signs of plastic

The lifeless creatures washed up on the shore on February 1 and marine workers checked the creatures digestive system for signs of plastic 

Ms Widermann said the animal looked in good health except for the presence of plastic, indicating it played a key role in the animal's death

Ms Widermann said the animal looked in good health except for the presence of plastic, indicating it played a key role in the animal's death

Ms Widermann said the animal looked in good health except for the presence of plastic, indicating it played a key role in the animal’s death

Ms Widermann said the animal looked in good health except for the presence of plastic, indicating it played a key role in the animal’s death. 

‘Everything looked normal and her intestines were full of food, but when they went close to her bowels, pieces of plastic were stuck, blocking anything from getting out,’ she adds. 

The turtle may have died from internal poisoning because of this, the experts believe. 

Ms Widermann said that the incident was coordinated to the local authorities.

She added: ‘It was so sad to see this in real life and a solid reminder that we have a big job to do.’

HOW DOES PLASTIC KILL TURTLES?

Sea turtles live in the ocean and feed on vegetation and algae floating in the waters. 

Unfortunately, many pieces of litter discarded by humans pollute these waters and resemble food. 

The sea turtles mistake them for nutrition and consume them. 

This plastic then enters their digestive tract and causes havoc to the animal’s innards. 

A study in 2018 found eating a single piece of plastic increases the turtles chance of death. 

Researchers found there it caused a one in five chance of death – rising to 50 per cent for 14 pieces.

Turtles have a digestive tract which means they are physically incapable of regurgitation. 

Once something has been eaten, it stays in the animal unless it can be defecated. 

Once inside the animal, if a piece of plastic covers an organ or blocks a key canal, it can create a fatal blockage.

Plastic blockages stopping the passing of food or faeces can kill turtles, but harder pieces can also inflict fatal internal injuries.