Trump bashed Democrat-run cities burned by rioters and demands more National Guard be activated


Donald Trump took to Twitter Sunday afternoon to voice his displeasure with Democratic mayors and governors across the country who he feels are not taking enough action to stop violent rioters in their respective jurisdictions.

‘Get tough Democrat Mayors and Governors,’ the president urged in a tweet. ‘These people are ANARCHISTS. Call in our National Guard NOW.’

‘The World is watching and laughing at you and Sleepy Joe,’ he continued of those leaders and the presumed Democratic nominee Joe Biden. ‘Is this what America wants? NO!!!’

The president is referencing state and local elected officials who have still not called in the National Guard to help mitigate violent riots that have broken out in cities across the country.

Widespread looting and burning hit Philadelphia, Pennsylvania over the weekend where stores including the Apple Store and Sephora were all smashed up and ransacked as people broke in and stole goods on Saturday.

Donald Trump demanded that state and local lawmakers ‘get tough’ and call in the National Guard to their cities to help mitigate escalating riots in the midst of George Floyd’s death

Trump specifically mentioned the rioting in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania ¿ the state has not yet called in the National Guard ¿ and lauded the job done by enforcement in Minneapolis

Trump specifically mentioned the rioting in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania – the state has not yet called in the National Guard – and lauded the job done by enforcement in Minneapolis

Looters and rioters in Philadelphia have set fires in the streets and destroyed brick and mortar businesses and stolen the goods ¿ including at Apple and Sephora

Looters and rioters in Philadelphia have set fires in the streets and destroyed brick and mortar businesses and stolen the goods – including at Apple and Sephora 

National Guard was called into Minneapolis, Minnesota on Saturday by Democratic Governor Tim Walz ¿ the riots originated in the city after George Floyd, a black man was killed by a white cop

National Guard was called into Minneapolis, Minnesota on Saturday by Democratic Governor Tim Walz – the riots originated in the city after George Floyd, a black man was killed by a white cop 

Here National Guardsmen are stationed in front of the Minnesota state capital building

Here National Guardsmen are stationed in front of the Minnesota state capital building 

National Guard was also activiated in Los Angeles by California's Democratic Governor Gavin Newsom

National Guard was also activiated in Los Angeles by California’s Democratic Governor Gavin Newsom

Natioanl outrage ensued after video emerged of a black man, George Floyd (pictured), being killed during an arrest after a white police officer held his knee on his neck for eight minutes in Minneapolis, Minnesota

Natioanl outrage ensued after video emerged of a black man, George Floyd (pictured), being killed during an arrest after a white police officer held his knee on his neck for eight minutes in Minneapolis, Minnesota

At least 13 police officers were injured during the protests and parts of the city were left ablaze.

This led Pennsylvania’s Democratic Governor Tom Wolf to sign an emergency declaration to assist the city, which continued to burn on Sunday.

‘Law & Order in Philadelphia, NOW!’ the president said in a separate tweet. ‘They are looting stores.’

‘Call in our great National Guard like they FINALLY did (thank you President Trump) last night in Minneapolis,’ Trump demanded of the Pennsylvania governor. ‘Is this what voters want with Sleepy Joe? All Dems!’

The president is suggesting that Biden’s presidency would lead to more unrest in race relations, especially between black citizens and white law enforcement – and urged that Democrats are worse at dealing with this tense situation.

The protests stemmed from a video-taped incident where a 46-year-old black man, George Floyd, was killed in Minneapolis during an arrest where four officers pinned him down.

One of the officers, a white man, can be seen on video kneeling on Floyd’s neck during the arrest for more than eight minutes as the victim is heard saying that he couldn’t breathe.

The death sparked widespread rage across the nation as protests broke out in dozens of cities, including Minneapolis, where Floyd was killed, Philadelphia, Los Angeles, New York City, Atlanta, Washington D.C. and many more.

Trump blamed the media for hyping up the situation, and claimed that different groups were trying to ‘foment hatred,’ including putting the onus on ANTIFA, a usually violent left-wing radical anti-facist movement.

‘The Lamestream Media is doing everything within their power to foment hatred and anarchy,’ Trump accused in a tweet Sunday. ‘As long as everybody understands what they are doing, that they are FAKE NEWS and truly bad people with a sick agenda, we can easily work through them to GREATNESS!’

Earlier in the day he announced he was designating ANTIFA as a terrorist group: ‘The United States of America will be designating ANTIFA as a Terrorist Organization.’

The president lauded the National Guard for dealing with the violent rioters in Minneapolis, where they were called in on Saturday.

‘Congratulations to our National Guard for the great job they did immediately upon arriving in Minneapolis, Minnesota, last night,’ he tweeted. ‘The ANTIFA led anarchists, among others, were shut down quickly.’

Trump also blamed the violent riots,

Trump also blamed the violent riots, 

Trump said Democratic-run areas should look to Minneapolis as an example of how the National Guard can help with rioters

Trump said Democratic-run areas should look to Minneapolis as an example of how the National Guard can help with rioters

He also blamed media for exacerbating the issue, claiming they 'foment hatred and anarchy'

He also blamed media for exacerbating the issue, claiming they ‘foment hatred and anarchy’

But he added that the action ‘Should have been done by Mayor on first night’ of the protests, claiming ‘there would have been no trouble’ if that was done.

‘Other Democrat run Cities and States should look at the total shutdown of Radical Left Anarchists in Minneapolis last night,’ the president said in urging other states to call in the National Guard to cities being burned and looted by the violent protests.

‘The National Guard did a great job, and should be used in other States before it is too late!’ he assured.

While several black lawmakers and elected officials across the country are defending the protesters’ rights to demonstrate, they are also demanding that the violence, looting, burning and destruction of cities come to an end.

Trump bashed Democrat-run cities burned by rioters and demands more National Guard be activated


Donald Trump took to Twitter Sunday afternoon to voice his displeasure with Democratic mayors and governors across the country who he feels are not taking enough action to stop violent rioters in their respective jurisdictions.

‘Get tough Democrat Mayors and Governors,’ the president urged in a tweet. ‘These people are ANARCHISTS. Call in our National Guard NOW.’

‘The World is watching and laughing at you and Sleepy Joe,’ he continued of those leaders and the presumed Democratic nominee Joe Biden. ‘Is this what America wants? NO!!!’

The president is referencing state and local elected officials who have still not called in the National Guard to help mitigate violent riots that have broken out in cities across the country.

Widespread looting and burning hit Philadelphia, Pennsylvania over the weekend where stores including the Apple Store and Sephora were all smashed up and ransacked as people broke in and stole goods on Saturday.

Donald Trump demanded that state and local lawmakers ‘get tough’ and call in the National Guard to their cities to help mitigate escalating riots in the midst of George Floyd’s death

Trump specifically mentioned the rioting in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania ¿ the state has not yet called in the National Guard ¿ and lauded the job done by enforcement in Minneapolis

Trump specifically mentioned the rioting in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania – the state has not yet called in the National Guard – and lauded the job done by enforcement in Minneapolis

Looters and rioters in Philadelphia have set fires in the streets and destroyed brick and mortar businesses and stolen the goods ¿ including at Apple and Sephora

Looters and rioters in Philadelphia have set fires in the streets and destroyed brick and mortar businesses and stolen the goods – including at Apple and Sephora 

National Guard was called into Minneapolis, Minnesota on Saturday by Democratic Governor Tim Walz ¿ the riots originated in the city after George Floyd, a black man was killed by a white cop

National Guard was called into Minneapolis, Minnesota on Saturday by Democratic Governor Tim Walz – the riots originated in the city after George Floyd, a black man was killed by a white cop 

Here National Guardsmen are stationed in front of the Minnesota state capital building

Here National Guardsmen are stationed in front of the Minnesota state capital building 

National Guard was also activiated in Los Angeles by California's Democratic Governor Gavin Newsom

National Guard was also activiated in Los Angeles by California’s Democratic Governor Gavin Newsom

Natioanl outrage ensued after video emerged of a black man, George Floyd (pictured), being killed during an arrest after a white police officer held his knee on his neck for eight minutes in Minneapolis, Minnesota

Natioanl outrage ensued after video emerged of a black man, George Floyd (pictured), being killed during an arrest after a white police officer held his knee on his neck for eight minutes in Minneapolis, Minnesota

At least 13 police officers were injured during the protests and parts of the city were left ablaze.

This led Pennsylvania’s Democratic Governor Tom Wolf to sign an emergency declaration to assist the city, which continued to burn on Sunday.

‘Law & Order in Philadelphia, NOW!’ the president said in a separate tweet. ‘They are looting stores.’

‘Call in our great National Guard like they FINALLY did (thank you President Trump) last night in Minneapolis,’ Trump demanded of the Pennsylvania governor. ‘Is this what voters want with Sleepy Joe? All Dems!’

The president is suggesting that Biden’s presidency would lead to more unrest in race relations, especially between black citizens and white law enforcement – and urged that Democrats are worse at dealing with this tense situation.

The protests stemmed from a video-taped incident where a 46-year-old black man, George Floyd, was killed in Minneapolis during an arrest where four officers pinned him down.

One of the officers, a white man, can be seen on video kneeling on Floyd’s neck during the arrest for more than eight minutes as the victim is heard saying that he couldn’t breathe.

The death sparked widespread rage across the nation as protests broke out in dozens of cities, including Minneapolis, where Floyd was killed, Philadelphia, Los Angeles, New York City, Atlanta, Washington D.C. and many more.

Trump blamed the media for hyping up the situation, and claimed that different groups were trying to ‘foment hatred,’ including putting the onus on ANTIFA, a usually violent left-wing radical anti-facist movement.

‘The Lamestream Media is doing everything within their power to foment hatred and anarchy,’ Trump accused in a tweet Sunday. ‘As long as everybody understands what they are doing, that they are FAKE NEWS and truly bad people with a sick agenda, we can easily work through them to GREATNESS!’

Earlier in the day he announced he was designating ANTIFA as a terrorist group: ‘The United States of America will be designating ANTIFA as a Terrorist Organization.’

The president lauded the National Guard for dealing with the violent rioters in Minneapolis, where they were called in on Saturday.

‘Congratulations to our National Guard for the great job they did immediately upon arriving in Minneapolis, Minnesota, last night,’ he tweeted. ‘The ANTIFA led anarchists, among others, were shut down quickly.’

Trump also blamed the violent riots,

Trump also blamed the violent riots, 

Trump said Democratic-run areas should look to Minneapolis as an example of how the National Guard can help with rioters

Trump said Democratic-run areas should look to Minneapolis as an example of how the National Guard can help with rioters

He also blamed media for exacerbating the issue, claiming they 'foment hatred and anarchy'

He also blamed media for exacerbating the issue, claiming they ‘foment hatred and anarchy’

But he added that the action ‘Should have been done by Mayor on first night’ of the protests, claiming ‘there would have been no trouble’ if that was done.

‘Other Democrat run Cities and States should look at the total shutdown of Radical Left Anarchists in Minneapolis last night,’ the president said in urging other states to call in the National Guard to cities being burned and looted by the violent protests.

‘The National Guard did a great job, and should be used in other States before it is too late!’ he assured.

While several black lawmakers and elected officials across the country are defending the protesters’ rights to demonstrate, they are also demanding that the violence, looting, burning and destruction of cities come to an end.

GUY ADAMS examines the life and times of Elon Musk


Except for one sticky moment when U.S. astronaut Doug Hurley appeared to clobber his head on an entry hatch as he crossed the threshold of the International Space Station, it all went like a dream.

At teatime yesterday, a 19-hour flight followed by a flawless piece of zero-orbit parking saw the Space X capsule reach its destination some 262 miles above Earth.

Watching was an audience of tens of millions bearing witness to a new chapter in space exploration: not only are Doug and his crewmate Bob Behnken the first Americans to fly from their own soil into space for almost nine years (in the interim, colleagues have been hitching pricey rides on Russian spacecraft) they are also the first astronauts to reach the ISS in a privately built rocket.

The pioneering duo blasted off from Titusville, Florida, on Saturday, watched by President Donald Trump and his deputy, Mike Pence. In the UK, the rocket was spotted passing below the moon just before 10pm.

Space X is the brainchild of Elon Musk (pictured left, with girlfriend Grime, right), a highly eccentric Silicon Valley tycoon who brought the world PayPal and Tesla cars, and is now devoting his $37 billion fortune to going where no man has gone before

En route, they enjoyed an eight-hour sleep, ate dinner and sent a short film back to Earth with footage of a ‘stowaway’: a toy dinosaur named Tremor the Apatosaurus, sent by their sons (aged six and ten) to keep them company. They will now spend up to four months at their destination.

To some, the so-far-successful mission recalls the heyday of American space exploration, when the world gathered round television sets to watch the likes of Neil Armstrong take giant leaps for mankind.

Yet the man behind this brave new era is no ordinary Nasa boffin.

Space X is the brainchild of Elon Musk, a highly eccentric Silicon Valley tycoon who brought the world PayPal and Tesla cars, and is now devoting his $37 billion fortune to going where no man has gone before.

Musk launched the firm in the early 2000s, announcing that he intends, within a few decades, not only to have put an astronaut on Mars, but also to be taking the first steps to establish a human colony there, thus ensuring mankind’s future, should Earth one day become uninhabitable.

Declaring himself ‘overcome with emotion’, he has, for now, managed to silence the doubters. So who is this eccentric rocket man?

Astronaut Bob Behnken arrives at the International Space Station and becomes one of two Americans to fly from their own soil into space for almost nine years

Astronaut Bob Behnken arrives at the International Space Station and becomes one of two Americans to fly from their own soil into space for almost nine years

A troubled Childhood

Nicknamed ‘genius boy’, Elon Musk purportedly read the entire Encyclopaedia Britannica in early childhood and learned to ‘code’ at the age of ten, within days of acquiring a computer. By 12, he’d created and sold his first tech product, a video game called Blastar, for £500.

It was not, however, a happy childhood. The 48-year-old was born in apartheid-era South Africa, one of three children of engineer Errol Musk and his author wife, Maye. His parents divorced when he was eight.

At school, he was badly bullied, once beaten so badly he spent a fortnight in hospital. At home, things were barely better. Errol, from whom he’s been estranged for years, was a strict disciplinarian allegedly fond of corporal punishment. In 2018, it emerged that Errol had a fathered child with his stepdaughter Jana. Musk told Rolling Stone magazine that Errol is ‘a terrible human being’.

Off to AMERICA…

By the age of 17, Musk was desperate to escape South Africa and his overbearing dad, so decided to head for Canada, where his mother Maye had grown up.

He arrived without a penny to his name, relying on the generosity of relatives for accommodation and living for weeks at a time off economy-size bags of hot dogs.

Eventually, he won a place at the University of Pennsylvania to study Economics and Physics. After graduating, Musk headed west, to Silicon Valley, where in 1995 he was accepted onto a PhD course at the prestigious Stanford University. However, he dropped out during his first week to start a business called Zip2, which developed software for media companies.

The timing could not have been better: Zip2 rode the internet boom and was sold in 1999 for an astonishing $341 million, netting Musk a $22 million cut. But that was just the start . . .

Electric dreams

Musk proceeded to join the ranks of the global super-rich via his next bet: an online bank called X.com, which was eventually sold to eBay in 2002, earning him roughly $180 million —after tax.

The cash allowed him to dream big. That year he founded SpaceX, announcing that his end goal was to build a ‘BFR’ — or ‘Big F*****g Rocket’ — to help mankind colonise Mars before over-population renders Earth uninhabitable.

In 2003 and 2004, Musk also made timely bets on the alternative energy sector, founding a company called Solarcity, which is now America’s largest installer of solar panels, and Tesla, the luxury electric car firm, which has revolutionised the motor industry.

His logic was that helping to wean the world off oil would buy us extra time to address global warming, should the colonisation of Mars take longer than expected.

Tangled love life

Wealth and success appear to have made the once geeky Musk very attractive to women.

But the entrepreneur is a proud and unapologetic workaholic who famously boasted ‘nobody ever changed the world on 40 hours a week’.

His first wife, Justine Wilson, a fantasy novelist whom he’d met at university, grew tired of spending all day at home with their five sons — a set of twins and triplets.

She announced around the time of their 2008 divorce: ‘Elon’s central relationship is with his work.’ Within weeks, Musk had moved on to the British actress Talulah Riley, whom he married, then divorced in 2012, remarried in 2013, but then divorced for a second time in 2015.

U.S. astronauts Doug Hurley and his crewmate Bob Behnken are the first astronauts to reach the ISS in a privately built rocket

U.S. astronauts Doug Hurley and his crewmate Bob Behnken are the first astronauts to reach the ISS in a privately built rocket

After a year-long dalliance with Johnny Depp’s ex, Hollywood actress Amber Heard, Musk began stepping out with a Canadian indie musician known as Grimes.

Their son, who was born earlier this month, made headlines after the couple attempted, for reasons best known to themselves, to register his name as ‘X Æ A-12’ (pronounced ‘Ex ash A twelve’). Californian authorities refused to play ball, on the grounds that it’s illegal to use numbers in a name, so the couple had to eventually make do with ‘X Æ A-Xii’.

In a recent interview, Grimes, whose real name is Claire Boucher, told Bloomberg that around the house, the baby is actually known as ‘Little X’.

Digging a hole…

Stuck in a traffic jam just before Christmas 2016, Musk took to Twitter to declare ‘I am going to build a tunnel boring machine and just start digging’, to create an alternative transport network deep underground in his home city of Los Angeles.

He duly launched The Boring Company, a firm designed to pursue that very aim.

Two years later, in June 2018, Musk decided that it could help save a dozen members of a youth football team trapped a vast cave complex in northern Thailand.

Musk arrived at the scene with a child-sized submarine, which he claimed would be able to act as a sort of escape pod.

However, experts were sceptical, with one rescue diver, a British national called Vernon Unsworth, telling CNN that the whole thing was a PR stunt and that the South African could ‘stick his submarine where it hurts’.

Musk responded via Twitter, branding Unsworth, who has a younger Thai partner, ‘pedo guy’.

The Briton responded by suing for defamation in California, seeking $190 million. In court, Musk apologised for the slur but alleged that he did not mean to suggest that Unsworth had actually molested a child.

The jury agreed, leading Musk to declare: ‘My faith in humanity is restored!’

SpaceX CEO and owner Elon Musk celebrates after the launch of a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket and Crew Dragon spacecraft on NASA's SpaceX Demo-2 mission to the International Space Station

SpaceX CEO and owner Elon Musk celebrates after the launch of a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket and Crew Dragon spacecraft on NASA’s SpaceX Demo-2 mission to the International Space Station

Drink and drugs

Sending men into space is a dangerous and complex task that requires clear heads, sharp thinking, and an extraordinary eye for detail. Especially when American taxpayers are footing the bill.

All of which explains the almighty kerfuffle that ensued in September 2018, when a dishevelled-looking Musk appeared on a podcast and proceeded to drink copious quantities of whisky and smoke a large marijuana cigarette, while discussing his life and times.

Film of the appearance, in which the puce-faced tech tycoon coughed and spluttered his way through a haze of cannabis smoke, rapidly went viral, prompting Nasa to launch an urgent investigation into SpaceX’s ‘adherence to a drug-free environment’. The Pentagon decided to review his Federal security clearance.

Chastened, Musk shoehorned himself into a suit and tie for a more formal TV interview. ‘I do not smoke pot,’ he said. ‘As anyone who has watched that podcast could tell, I have no idea how to smoke pot.’

Erratic Tweets

Much like President Trump, Musk is a compulsive user of Twitter, posting endlessly on the site, often at odd hours of the day and night.

This does not always dovetail well with his role as boss of Tesla, a $150billion company traded on the Nasdaq, which can make market-sensitive information public only in strictly regulated circumstances.

Around the same time as the pot-smoking controversy, he suddenly used the social network to announce that he had ‘funding secured’ to take his car company Tesla private at $420 a share. The message may have been intended as a joke (‘420’ is slang for marijuana), but regulators did not see the funny side since Tesla shares were then trading at 20 per cent less than the supposed price.

An investigation by the Securities and Exchange Commission, which regulates U.S. markets, duly saw Musk charged with securities fraud.

In a settlement reached in late 2018, he agreed to step down as Tesla chairman for three years, pay a $20 million fine, and grant a company lawyer oversight of future Tweets.

Yet last month, Musk embarked on a lengthy rant on the site during which he promised to sell ‘almost all’ his physical possessions and declared that Tesla’s share price was ‘too high’, sending it down by nearly 12 per cent in half an hour.

The Securities and Exchange Commission has yet to comment on what action, if any, it plans to take.

GUY ADAMS examines the life and times of Elon Musk


Except for one sticky moment when U.S. astronaut Doug Hurley appeared to clobber his head on an entry hatch as he crossed the threshold of the International Space Station, it all went like a dream.

At teatime yesterday, a 19-hour flight followed by a flawless piece of zero-orbit parking saw the Space X capsule reach its destination some 262 miles above Earth.

Watching was an audience of tens of millions bearing witness to a new chapter in space exploration: not only are Doug and his crewmate Bob Behnken the first Americans to fly from their own soil into space for almost nine years (in the interim, colleagues have been hitching pricey rides on Russian spacecraft) they are also the first astronauts to reach the ISS in a privately built rocket.

The pioneering duo blasted off from Titusville, Florida, on Saturday, watched by President Donald Trump and his deputy, Mike Pence. In the UK, the rocket was spotted passing below the moon just before 10pm.

Space X is the brainchild of Elon Musk (pictured left, with girlfriend Grime, right), a highly eccentric Silicon Valley tycoon who brought the world PayPal and Tesla cars, and is now devoting his $37 billion fortune to going where no man has gone before

En route, they enjoyed an eight-hour sleep, ate dinner and sent a short film back to Earth with footage of a ‘stowaway’: a toy dinosaur named Tremor the Apatosaurus, sent by their sons (aged six and ten) to keep them company. They will now spend up to four months at their destination.

To some, the so-far-successful mission recalls the heyday of American space exploration, when the world gathered round television sets to watch the likes of Neil Armstrong take giant leaps for mankind.

Yet the man behind this brave new era is no ordinary Nasa boffin.

Space X is the brainchild of Elon Musk, a highly eccentric Silicon Valley tycoon who brought the world PayPal and Tesla cars, and is now devoting his $37 billion fortune to going where no man has gone before.

Musk launched the firm in the early 2000s, announcing that he intends, within a few decades, not only to have put an astronaut on Mars, but also to be taking the first steps to establish a human colony there, thus ensuring mankind’s future, should Earth one day become uninhabitable.

Declaring himself ‘overcome with emotion’, he has, for now, managed to silence the doubters. So who is this eccentric rocket man?

Astronaut Bob Behnken arrives at the International Space Station and becomes one of two Americans to fly from their own soil into space for almost nine years

Astronaut Bob Behnken arrives at the International Space Station and becomes one of two Americans to fly from their own soil into space for almost nine years

A troubled Childhood

Nicknamed ‘genius boy’, Elon Musk purportedly read the entire Encyclopaedia Britannica in early childhood and learned to ‘code’ at the age of ten, within days of acquiring a computer. By 12, he’d created and sold his first tech product, a video game called Blastar, for £500.

It was not, however, a happy childhood. The 48-year-old was born in apartheid-era South Africa, one of three children of engineer Errol Musk and his author wife, Maye. His parents divorced when he was eight.

At school, he was badly bullied, once beaten so badly he spent a fortnight in hospital. At home, things were barely better. Errol, from whom he’s been estranged for years, was a strict disciplinarian allegedly fond of corporal punishment. In 2018, it emerged that Errol had a fathered child with his stepdaughter Jana. Musk told Rolling Stone magazine that Errol is ‘a terrible human being’.

Off to AMERICA…

By the age of 17, Musk was desperate to escape South Africa and his overbearing dad, so decided to head for Canada, where his mother Maye had grown up.

He arrived without a penny to his name, relying on the generosity of relatives for accommodation and living for weeks at a time off economy-size bags of hot dogs.

Eventually, he won a place at the University of Pennsylvania to study Economics and Physics. After graduating, Musk headed west, to Silicon Valley, where in 1995 he was accepted onto a PhD course at the prestigious Stanford University. However, he dropped out during his first week to start a business called Zip2, which developed software for media companies.

The timing could not have been better: Zip2 rode the internet boom and was sold in 1999 for an astonishing $341 million, netting Musk a $22 million cut. But that was just the start . . .

Electric dreams

Musk proceeded to join the ranks of the global super-rich via his next bet: an online bank called X.com, which was eventually sold to eBay in 2002, earning him roughly $180 million —after tax.

The cash allowed him to dream big. That year he founded SpaceX, announcing that his end goal was to build a ‘BFR’ — or ‘Big F*****g Rocket’ — to help mankind colonise Mars before over-population renders Earth uninhabitable.

In 2003 and 2004, Musk also made timely bets on the alternative energy sector, founding a company called Solarcity, which is now America’s largest installer of solar panels, and Tesla, the luxury electric car firm, which has revolutionised the motor industry.

His logic was that helping to wean the world off oil would buy us extra time to address global warming, should the colonisation of Mars take longer than expected.

Tangled love life

Wealth and success appear to have made the once geeky Musk very attractive to women.

But the entrepreneur is a proud and unapologetic workaholic who famously boasted ‘nobody ever changed the world on 40 hours a week’.

His first wife, Justine Wilson, a fantasy novelist whom he’d met at university, grew tired of spending all day at home with their five sons — a set of twins and triplets.

She announced around the time of their 2008 divorce: ‘Elon’s central relationship is with his work.’ Within weeks, Musk had moved on to the British actress Talulah Riley, whom he married, then divorced in 2012, remarried in 2013, but then divorced for a second time in 2015.

U.S. astronauts Doug Hurley and his crewmate Bob Behnken are the first astronauts to reach the ISS in a privately built rocket

U.S. astronauts Doug Hurley and his crewmate Bob Behnken are the first astronauts to reach the ISS in a privately built rocket

After a year-long dalliance with Johnny Depp’s ex, Hollywood actress Amber Heard, Musk began stepping out with a Canadian indie musician known as Grimes.

Their son, who was born earlier this month, made headlines after the couple attempted, for reasons best known to themselves, to register his name as ‘X Æ A-12’ (pronounced ‘Ex ash A twelve’). Californian authorities refused to play ball, on the grounds that it’s illegal to use numbers in a name, so the couple had to eventually make do with ‘X Æ A-Xii’.

In a recent interview, Grimes, whose real name is Claire Boucher, told Bloomberg that around the house, the baby is actually known as ‘Little X’.

Digging a hole…

Stuck in a traffic jam just before Christmas 2016, Musk took to Twitter to declare ‘I am going to build a tunnel boring machine and just start digging’, to create an alternative transport network deep underground in his home city of Los Angeles.

He duly launched The Boring Company, a firm designed to pursue that very aim.

Two years later, in June 2018, Musk decided that it could help save a dozen members of a youth football team trapped a vast cave complex in northern Thailand.

Musk arrived at the scene with a child-sized submarine, which he claimed would be able to act as a sort of escape pod.

However, experts were sceptical, with one rescue diver, a British national called Vernon Unsworth, telling CNN that the whole thing was a PR stunt and that the South African could ‘stick his submarine where it hurts’.

Musk responded via Twitter, branding Unsworth, who has a younger Thai partner, ‘pedo guy’.

The Briton responded by suing for defamation in California, seeking $190 million. In court, Musk apologised for the slur but alleged that he did not mean to suggest that Unsworth had actually molested a child.

The jury agreed, leading Musk to declare: ‘My faith in humanity is restored!’

SpaceX CEO and owner Elon Musk celebrates after the launch of a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket and Crew Dragon spacecraft on NASA's SpaceX Demo-2 mission to the International Space Station

SpaceX CEO and owner Elon Musk celebrates after the launch of a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket and Crew Dragon spacecraft on NASA’s SpaceX Demo-2 mission to the International Space Station

Drink and drugs

Sending men into space is a dangerous and complex task that requires clear heads, sharp thinking, and an extraordinary eye for detail. Especially when American taxpayers are footing the bill.

All of which explains the almighty kerfuffle that ensued in September 2018, when a dishevelled-looking Musk appeared on a podcast and proceeded to drink copious quantities of whisky and smoke a large marijuana cigarette, while discussing his life and times.

Film of the appearance, in which the puce-faced tech tycoon coughed and spluttered his way through a haze of cannabis smoke, rapidly went viral, prompting Nasa to launch an urgent investigation into SpaceX’s ‘adherence to a drug-free environment’. The Pentagon decided to review his Federal security clearance.

Chastened, Musk shoehorned himself into a suit and tie for a more formal TV interview. ‘I do not smoke pot,’ he said. ‘As anyone who has watched that podcast could tell, I have no idea how to smoke pot.’

Erratic Tweets

Much like President Trump, Musk is a compulsive user of Twitter, posting endlessly on the site, often at odd hours of the day and night.

This does not always dovetail well with his role as boss of Tesla, a $150billion company traded on the Nasdaq, which can make market-sensitive information public only in strictly regulated circumstances.

Around the same time as the pot-smoking controversy, he suddenly used the social network to announce that he had ‘funding secured’ to take his car company Tesla private at $420 a share. The message may have been intended as a joke (‘420’ is slang for marijuana), but regulators did not see the funny side since Tesla shares were then trading at 20 per cent less than the supposed price.

An investigation by the Securities and Exchange Commission, which regulates U.S. markets, duly saw Musk charged with securities fraud.

In a settlement reached in late 2018, he agreed to step down as Tesla chairman for three years, pay a $20 million fine, and grant a company lawyer oversight of future Tweets.

Yet last month, Musk embarked on a lengthy rant on the site during which he promised to sell ‘almost all’ his physical possessions and declared that Tesla’s share price was ‘too high’, sending it down by nearly 12 per cent in half an hour.

The Securities and Exchange Commission has yet to comment on what action, if any, it plans to take.

Trump designates ‘Antifa as a terrorist organization’


President Donald Trump has declared that the anti-fascist movement known as antifa will be designated as a terrorist group. 

‘The United States of America will be designating ANTIFA as a Terrorist Organization,’ the president tweeted Sunday afternoon. 

On Saturday Trump blamed antifa for violent nationwide protests over the death of George Floyd, after Minnesota Gov Tim Walz suggested that foreign influences, white supremacists and drug cartels are fueling chaos.

‘It’s ANTIFA and the Radical Left. Don’t lay the blame on others!’ Trump said in a tweet on Saturday, referring to the militant far-left movement, short for ‘anti-fascist’, that is known for violence.

President Donald Trump has declared that the anti-fascist protest movement known as antifa will be designated as a terrorist group

'The United States of America will be designating ANTIFA as a Terrorist Organization,' the president tweeted Sunday afternoon

‘The United States of America will be designating ANTIFA as a Terrorist Organization,’ the president tweeted Sunday afternoon

On Saturday Trump blamed antifa for violent nationwide protests (burning police car in Miami) over the death of George Floyd, after Minnesota Gov Tim Walz suggested that foreign influences, white supremacists and drug cartels are fueling chaos

On Saturday Trump blamed antifa for violent nationwide protests (burning police car in Miami) over the death of George Floyd, after Minnesota Gov Tim Walz suggested that foreign influences, white supremacists and drug cartels are fueling chaos

Widespread looting and arson continued in Minneapolis and across multiple major cities across the US on Saturday, leaving three dead and dozens more injured.  

Echoing the president, Attorney General Bill Barr said on Saturday that ‘the voices of peaceful protest are being hijacked by radical elements’.

‘Groups of outside radicals and agitators are exploiting the situation to pursue their own separate and violent agenda,’ Barr said in an on-camera statement. 

‘In many places it appears the violence is planned, organized and driven by anarchic and far-left extremist groups using antifa-like tactics.’ 

‘It is a federal crime to cross state lines or use interstate facilities to incite or participate in violent rioting and we will enforce those laws,’ he added, saying that the FBI, US Marshals, DEA, ATF and US Attorney’s Offices would fully support local and state law enforcement in restoring order and cracking down on violence. 

Earlier on Saturday, Gov Walz suggested domestic terrorists or foreign influences might be subverting peaceful protests and turning them to violence.

Walz said the riots in Minneapolis had begun to resemble a ‘military operation’ and that he was actively weighing whether to accept military and intelligence assistance from The Pentagon. 

‘Last night is a mockery of pretending that this is about George Floyd’s death, or inequities, or historical traumas to our communities of color,’ said Walz, a Democrat.

'It's ANTIFA and the Radical Left. Don't lay the blame on others!' Trump said in a tweet on Saturday, referring to the militant far-left movement, short for 'anti-fascist', that is known for violence. Protesters are seen in Washington, DC, on Saturday

‘It’s ANTIFA and the Radical Left. Don’t lay the blame on others!’ Trump said in a tweet on Saturday, referring to the militant far-left movement, short for ‘anti-fascist’, that is known for violence. Protesters are seen in Washington, DC, on Saturday 

Protesters march through the streets of Detroit, Michigan, on Saturday night

Protesters march through the streets of Detroit, Michigan, on Saturday night 

WHAT IS THE ANTI-FASCIST MOVEMENT (ANTIFA)

Antifa sometimes use a logo with a double flag, usually in black and red

Antifa sometimes use a logo with a double flag, usually in black and red

The anti-fascist protest movement known as antifa gained new prominence in the United States after the white supremacist Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville, VA, in August 2017. 

In Charlottesville and at many subsequent events held by white supremacists or right-wing extremists, antifa activists have aggressively confronted what they believe to be authoritarian movements and groups. 

While most counter-protestors tend to be peaceful, there have been several instances where encounters between antifa and the far-right have turned violent.

These violent counter-protesters are often part of ‘antifa’ (short for ‘antifascist’), a loose collection of groups, networks and individuals who believe in active, aggressive opposition to far right-wing movements. Their ideology is rooted in the assumption that the Nazi party would never have been able to come to power in Germany if people had more aggressively fought them in the streets in the 1920s and 30s. 

Most antifa come from the anarchist movement or from the far left, though since the 2016 presidential election, some people with more mainstream political backgrounds have also joined their ranks.

The antifa sometimes use a logo with a double flag, usually in black and red. The antifa movement began in the 1960s in Europe, and had reached the US by the end of the 1970s. Most people who show up to counter or oppose white supremacist public events are peaceful demonstrators, but when antifa show up, as they frequently do, they can increase the chances that an event may turn violent. 

Antifa have expanded their definition of fascist/fascism to include not just white supremacists and other extremists, but also many conservatives and supporters of President Trump. 

Because there is no unifying body for antifa, it is impossible to know how many ‘members’ are currently active. Different localities have antifa populations of different strengths, but antifa are also sometimes willing to travel hundreds of miles to oppose a white supremacist event.

Source: Anti-Defamation League 

‘The situation in Minneapolis is no longer in any way about the murder of George Floyd, it is about attacking civil society, instilling fear, and disrupting our great cities,’ Walz said.

‘As you saw this expand across the United States, and you start to see whether it be domestic terrorism, whether it be ideological extremists to fan the group, or whether it be international destabilization of how our country works,’ he continued.

On Friday night, Walz hinted that white supremacists and drug cartels may be fueling violence or taking advantage of the chaos in the rioting. 

Pressed by reporters on rumors that white supremacists were secretly infiltrating Black Lives Matter protests and instigating violence, Walz said: ‘My suspicions and what I’ve seen on this, yes.’

‘It gets worse than that,’ Walz said. ‘The cartels, who are wondering if there was a break in their drug transmissions, are trying to take advantage of the chaos. That’s why this situation is on a federal level.’ 

Trump designates ‘Antifa as a terrorist organization’


President Donald Trump has declared that the anti-fascist movement known as antifa will be designated as a terrorist group. 

‘The United States of America will be designating ANTIFA as a Terrorist Organization,’ the president tweeted Sunday afternoon. 

On Saturday Trump blamed antifa for violent nationwide protests over the death of George Floyd, after Minnesota Gov Tim Walz suggested that foreign influences, white supremacists and drug cartels are fueling chaos.

‘It’s ANTIFA and the Radical Left. Don’t lay the blame on others!’ Trump said in a tweet on Saturday, referring to the militant far-left movement, short for ‘anti-fascist’, that is known for violence.

President Donald Trump has declared that the anti-fascist protest movement known as antifa will be designated as a terrorist group

'The United States of America will be designating ANTIFA as a Terrorist Organization,' the president tweeted Sunday afternoon

‘The United States of America will be designating ANTIFA as a Terrorist Organization,’ the president tweeted Sunday afternoon

On Saturday Trump blamed antifa for violent nationwide protests (burning police car in Miami) over the death of George Floyd, after Minnesota Gov Tim Walz suggested that foreign influences, white supremacists and drug cartels are fueling chaos

On Saturday Trump blamed antifa for violent nationwide protests (burning police car in Miami) over the death of George Floyd, after Minnesota Gov Tim Walz suggested that foreign influences, white supremacists and drug cartels are fueling chaos

Widespread looting and arson continued in Minneapolis and across multiple major cities across the US on Saturday, leaving three dead and dozens more injured.  

Echoing the president, Attorney General Bill Barr said on Saturday that ‘the voices of peaceful protest are being hijacked by radical elements’.

‘Groups of outside radicals and agitators are exploiting the situation to pursue their own separate and violent agenda,’ Barr said in an on-camera statement. 

‘In many places it appears the violence is planned, organized and driven by anarchic and far-left extremist groups using antifa-like tactics.’ 

‘It is a federal crime to cross state lines or use interstate facilities to incite or participate in violent rioting and we will enforce those laws,’ he added, saying that the FBI, US Marshals, DEA, ATF and US Attorney’s Offices would fully support local and state law enforcement in restoring order and cracking down on violence. 

Earlier on Saturday, Gov Walz suggested domestic terrorists or foreign influences might be subverting peaceful protests and turning them to violence.

Walz said the riots in Minneapolis had begun to resemble a ‘military operation’ and that he was actively weighing whether to accept military and intelligence assistance from The Pentagon. 

‘Last night is a mockery of pretending that this is about George Floyd’s death, or inequities, or historical traumas to our communities of color,’ said Walz, a Democrat.

'It's ANTIFA and the Radical Left. Don't lay the blame on others!' Trump said in a tweet on Saturday, referring to the militant far-left movement, short for 'anti-fascist', that is known for violence. Protesters are seen in Washington, DC, on Saturday

‘It’s ANTIFA and the Radical Left. Don’t lay the blame on others!’ Trump said in a tweet on Saturday, referring to the militant far-left movement, short for ‘anti-fascist’, that is known for violence. Protesters are seen in Washington, DC, on Saturday 

Protesters march through the streets of Detroit, Michigan, on Saturday night

Protesters march through the streets of Detroit, Michigan, on Saturday night 

WHAT IS THE ANTI-FASCIST MOVEMENT (ANTIFA)

Antifa sometimes use a logo with a double flag, usually in black and red

Antifa sometimes use a logo with a double flag, usually in black and red

The anti-fascist protest movement known as antifa gained new prominence in the United States after the white supremacist Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville, VA, in August 2017. 

In Charlottesville and at many subsequent events held by white supremacists or right-wing extremists, antifa activists have aggressively confronted what they believe to be authoritarian movements and groups. 

While most counter-protestors tend to be peaceful, there have been several instances where encounters between antifa and the far-right have turned violent.

These violent counter-protesters are often part of ‘antifa’ (short for ‘antifascist’), a loose collection of groups, networks and individuals who believe in active, aggressive opposition to far right-wing movements. Their ideology is rooted in the assumption that the Nazi party would never have been able to come to power in Germany if people had more aggressively fought them in the streets in the 1920s and 30s. 

Most antifa come from the anarchist movement or from the far left, though since the 2016 presidential election, some people with more mainstream political backgrounds have also joined their ranks.

The antifa sometimes use a logo with a double flag, usually in black and red. The antifa movement began in the 1960s in Europe, and had reached the US by the end of the 1970s. Most people who show up to counter or oppose white supremacist public events are peaceful demonstrators, but when antifa show up, as they frequently do, they can increase the chances that an event may turn violent. 

Antifa have expanded their definition of fascist/fascism to include not just white supremacists and other extremists, but also many conservatives and supporters of President Trump. 

Because there is no unifying body for antifa, it is impossible to know how many ‘members’ are currently active. Different localities have antifa populations of different strengths, but antifa are also sometimes willing to travel hundreds of miles to oppose a white supremacist event.

Source: Anti-Defamation League 

‘The situation in Minneapolis is no longer in any way about the murder of George Floyd, it is about attacking civil society, instilling fear, and disrupting our great cities,’ Walz said.

‘As you saw this expand across the United States, and you start to see whether it be domestic terrorism, whether it be ideological extremists to fan the group, or whether it be international destabilization of how our country works,’ he continued.

On Friday night, Walz hinted that white supremacists and drug cartels may be fueling violence or taking advantage of the chaos in the rioting. 

Pressed by reporters on rumors that white supremacists were secretly infiltrating Black Lives Matter protests and instigating violence, Walz said: ‘My suspicions and what I’ve seen on this, yes.’

‘It gets worse than that,’ Walz said. ‘The cartels, who are wondering if there was a break in their drug transmissions, are trying to take advantage of the chaos. That’s why this situation is on a federal level.’ 

George Floyd’s brother says President Trump wouldn’t let him get a word in during their conversation


The bereaved brother of George Floyd said President Trump didn’t let him get a word in during a condolence call.

Philonise Floyd, the brother of the 46-year-old black man who died in the custody of Minneapolis police on Monday after an officer knelt on his neck for several minutes cutting off his air supply, said the president ‘kept pushing me off.’

‘It was so fast, he didn’t even give me the opportunity to speak,’ Floyd told MSNBC host Al Sharpton on Saturday.

‘It was hard. I was trying to talk to him, but he kept pushing me off like “I don’t want to hear what you’re talking about.’

George Floyd’s death on Monday has sparked nationwide protests as well as riots that have included violent clashes with police, widespread looting, and arson in several major cities across the country.

Philonise Floyd

President Trump (left) on Friday spoke to the family of George Floyd, the 46-year-old black man who died in police custody in Minneapolis on Monday. Floyd’s brother, Philonise (right), said the president ‘didn’t even give me the opportunity to speak’ during the conversation

Philonise Floyd said that he had a simple message for the president.

‘I just told him: “I want justice”.’

He said: ‘I said that I couldn’t believe that they committed a modern-day lynching in broad daylight.

‘I can’t stand for that. I can’t.’

Floyd's death has touched off nationwide outrage as protesters and demonstrators staged riots in major American cities. The above image from Saturday shows police officers in riot gear in downtown Miami

Floyd’s death has touched off nationwide outrage as protesters and demonstrators staged riots in major American cities. The above image from Saturday shows police officers in riot gear in downtown Miami

Philonise Floyd then broke down in tears while talking about his brother.

‘It hurt me,’ he said of his brother’s death.

A fatal shooting and lawsuit for excessive force: What we know about the four officers fired for George Floyd’s arrest

Derek Chauvin

In 2006 Derek Chauvin (pictured), 44, was one of six officers connected to the death of Wayne Reyes

In 2006 Derek Chauvin (pictured), 44, was one of six officers connected to the death of Wayne Reyes

The white police officer who knelt on George Floyd’s neck has already been investigated over three police shootings and a fatal car chase.

In 2006 Derek Chauvin, 44, was one of six officers connected to the death of Wayne Reyes.

Reyes, 42 was killed by officers after allegedly pulling a shotgun on the six cops, which included Chauvin.

Also that year he was named in a lawsuit filed by an inmate at the Minnesota Correctional Facility. The case was dismissed in 2007. 

Two years later Chauvin was investigated for his role in the 2008 shooting of Ira Latrell Toles during a domestic assault call.

Toles was wounded after police said he went for an officer’s gun and Chauvin shot him.

That same year Chauvin was handed a medal of valor for ‘his response in an incident involving a man armed with a gun.’ 

But in 2011 23-year-old Leroy Martinez was shot and injured during a chase given by officers including Chauvin.

Chauvin was arrested Friday – four days after Floyd’s death – and charged with third degree murder and manslaughter. 

Tou Thao

Tou Thao (pictured), was part of a $25,000 out of court settlement after being sued for using excessive force in 2017

Tou Thao (pictured), was part of a $25,000 out of court settlement after being sued for using excessive force in 2017

Tou Thao, was part of a $25,000 out of court settlement after being sued for using excessive force in 2017.

A lawsuit obtained by the DailyMail.com shows Thao was sued for using excessive force in arrest where he was accused of punching and kicking a handcuffed suspect ‘until his teeth broke’.

The remaining two officers have been identified as Thomas Lane and J Alexander Kueng.

Both were reportedly rookie cops who were still in their probationary periods.

Thao, Lane and Kueng do not currently face charges. 

‘I just don’t understand, man.

‘Why we gotta go through this? Why we gotta go through this pain, man?

‘I love my brother. I’m never going to see him again.’

DailyMail.com has sought comment from the White House.

During a news conference at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida, on Saturday, the president said he expressed sympathy to the Floyd family.

‘Yesterday, I spoke to George’s family and expressed the sorrow of our entire nation for their loss,’ Trump said.

‘I stand before you as a friend and ally to every American seeking justice and peace, and I stand before you in firm opposition to anyone exploiting this tragedy to loot, rob, and menace.

‘Healing not hatred, justice not chaos are the mission at hand.’

The president has been criticized for several tweets that seemed to vow a harsh crackdown against protesters, including one in which he referred to rioters and demonstrators as ‘thugs’ and warning that ‘when the looting starts, the shooting starts.’

On Saturday, however, the president tried to strike a different note.

‘I understand the pain that people are feeling,’ Trump said.

‘We support the right of peaceful protests and we hear their pleas, but what we are now seeing on the streets of our cities has nothing to do with the memory of George Floyd.

‘The violence and vandalism is being led by Antifa and other radical left-wing groups who are terrorizing the innocent, destroying jobs, hurting businesses and burning down buildings.

‘The main victims of this horrible, horrible situation are the citizens who live in these once-lovely communities… The mobs are devastating the life’s work of good people and destroying their dreams.

‘We support the overwhelming majority of police officers who are incredible in every way and devoted to public service.’

Derek Chauvin, the Minneapolis police officer who was filmed pressing his knee against George Floyd’s neck while he struggled to breathe and was handcuffed, has been charged with third-degree murder and manslaughter.

During his interview on MSNBC, Philonise Floyd was angry that authorities in Minnesota have yet to charge the other three police officers involved in his brother’s death.

The family is also seeking more serious charges against Chauvin, who ignored Floyd’s desperate pleas while he was suffocating.

Those three officers – Alexander Kueng, Thomas Lane and Tou Thao – have all been fired by the Minneapolis Police Department.

‘They all need to be convicted of first-degree murder, and given the death penalty because they didn’t care about what they wanted to do with my brother,’ Philonise Floyd told MSNBC.

‘[George Floyd] wasn’t a person to them, he was scum. He was nothing.

‘I can imagine how many people they did like that. I don’t need them on the streets to kill anybody else.

‘I’m hurt, my family is hurt. His kids are hurt.

‘They will grow up without a father.’

Philonise Floyd added: ‘Everybody is crying and in pain right now. So if they could do anything please arrest those other officers.’

Sharpton said he will travel to Minneapolis to deliver the eulogy at George Floyd’s funeral, though the MSNBC host misspoke.

Floyd’s funeral will be held in his hometown of Houston, Texas, according to Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner. A date and time have yet to be scheduled.

White cop charged with murdering George Floyd is on ‘suicide watch’ and being checked around the clock

Chauvin, the white police officer arrested and charged with the murder of George Floyd, is allegedly on effective suicide watch and being checked in on around the clock. 

TMZ reported Saturday that Chauvin, 44, has a camera focused on him all day and and cops check on his cell in person every 15 minutes. 

It adds that Chauvin, who was charged with third-degree murder and manslaughter on Friday, is under constant surveillance and is in isolation in Ramsey County Jail in St. Paul, Minnesota. 

Former cop Derek Chauvin, who was arrested for the murder of George Floyd on Friday, is reported to be on suicide watch in his single cell in Ramsey County Jail and under constant surveillance

Former cop Derek Chauvin, who was arrested for the murder of George Floyd on Friday, is reported to be on suicide watch in his single cell in Ramsey County Jail and under constant surveillance

George Floyd's (pictured) heartbroken family have called white cop Derek Chauvin to be charged with a more serious crime than third-degree murder

George Floyd

George Floyd’s (pictured) heartbroken family have called white cop Derek Chauvin to be charged with a more serious crime than third-degree murder after their lawyer revealed that Chauvin knelt on Floyd’s neck for a staggering eight minutes during the arrest for forgery

He remains in a single cell in a part of the facility set aside for high-profile cases. 

TMZ adds that a source says that the former police officer didn’t make eye contact with anyone when he was brought into the jail on Friday and that he was subject to an unclothed body search. 

He was then placed in a prison uniform and led to his cell. 

Checks on a cell every 15 minutes are said to be common in such a high-profile case, TMZ’s source said, but it is not confirmed if there is a threat to Chauvin’s life. 

Chauvin is reported to have 23 hours in his cell a day with one hour for recreation. He also has access to books, pencils and paper. 

Footage emerged Monday of white cop Chauvin kneeling on the neck of black man Floyd for more than eight minutes until he passed out and later died, sparking outrage over police brutality and seeing protests escalate across the nation.

Chauvin was taken into custody on Friday and charged with third-degree murder and manslaughter. His bail was set for $500,000. 

The Ramsey County Law Enforcement Center and adjoining adult detention center where disgraced former cop Derek Chauvin is being held for the murder of George Floyd

The Ramsey County Law Enforcement Center and adjoining adult detention center where disgraced former cop Derek Chauvin is being held for the murder of George Floyd

The arrest followed days of nationwide protests and riots demanding his arrest, after he was caught on video kneeling on Floyd’s neck while arresting him for allegedly trying to use a counterfeit $20 bill at a deli.

According to the criminal complaint against Chauvin, the Minneapolis police officer was said to have had his knee on Floyd’s neck for eight minutes and 46 seconds, with nearly three minutes of the time being after Floyd had become non-responsive. 

Floyd was then taken to the hospital where he was pronounced dead.

On Thursday evening it was revealed Floyd had actually worked with Chauvin as security guards at the El Nuevo Rodeo club, the club owner confirmed.

‘Chauvin was our off-duty police for almost the entirety of the 17 years that we were open,’ Maya Santamaria told KSTP-TV. 

Three other officers involved in Floyd’s arrest remain uncharged but were also fired from their jobs Tuesday. 

Protesters and Floyd’s family continue to call for the arrests of former officers J Alexander Kueng, Thomas Lane and Tou Thao and for a more serious charge to be brought against Chauvin. 

‘We call on authorities to revise the charges [against Chauvin] to reflect the culpability of this officer,’ a statement from the family Friday said. 

‘We fully expect to see the other officers who did nothing to protect the life of George Floyd to be arrested and charged soon.’

The criminal complaint filed against Chauvin Friday also cited the preliminary findings from a Tuesday autopsy conducted by the Hennepin County Medical Examiner which saw ‘no physical findings that support a diagnosis of traumatic asphyxiation or strangulation’.

George Floyd, a 46-year-old black man, died on Memorial Day as he was arrested by four police officers over allegedly trying to buy cigarettes with a counterfeit $20 bill

He was seen in a video pleading that he couldn't breathe as white officer Derek Chauvin pressed his knee against his neck

George Floyd, a 46-year-old black man, died on Memorial Day as he was arrested by four police officers over allegedly trying to buy cigarettes with a counterfeit $20 bill. He was seen in a video pleading that he couldn’t breathe as white officer Derek Chauvin pressed his knee against his neck

‘Mr. Floyd had underlying health conditions including coronary artery disease and hypertensive heart disease,’ said the complaint from the Hennepin County Attorney.

‘The combined effects of Mr. Floyd being restrained by police, his underlying health conditions and any potential intoxicants in his system likely contributed to his death.’

The full medical examiner’s report is pending but Floyd’s family have hired the services of former New York medical officer Dr. Michael Baden to perform a second independent autopsy. 

They are unhappy with the findings from the county medical examiner that they claim create an ‘illusion’ of underlying health conditions being responsible for his death.     

George Floyd’s brother says President Trump wouldn’t let him get a word in during their conversation


The bereaved brother of George Floyd said President Trump didn’t let him get a word in during a condolence call.

Philonise Floyd, the brother of the 46-year-old black man who died in the custody of Minneapolis police on Monday after an officer knelt on his neck for several minutes cutting off his air supply, said the president ‘kept pushing me off.’

‘It was so fast, he didn’t even give me the opportunity to speak,’ Floyd told MSNBC host Al Sharpton on Saturday.

‘It was hard. I was trying to talk to him, but he kept pushing me off like “I don’t want to hear what you’re talking about.’

George Floyd’s death on Monday has sparked nationwide protests as well as riots that have included violent clashes with police, widespread looting, and arson in several major cities across the country.

Philonise Floyd

President Trump (left) on Friday spoke to the family of George Floyd, the 46-year-old black man who died in police custody in Minneapolis on Monday. Floyd’s brother, Philonise (right), said the president ‘didn’t even give me the opportunity to speak’ during the conversation

Philonise Floyd said that he had a simple message for the president.

‘I just told him: “I want justice”.’

He said: ‘I said that I couldn’t believe that they committed a modern-day lynching in broad daylight.

‘I can’t stand for that. I can’t.’

Floyd's death has touched off nationwide outrage as protesters and demonstrators staged riots in major American cities. The above image from Saturday shows police officers in riot gear in downtown Miami

Floyd’s death has touched off nationwide outrage as protesters and demonstrators staged riots in major American cities. The above image from Saturday shows police officers in riot gear in downtown Miami

Philonise Floyd then broke down in tears while talking about his brother.

‘It hurt me,’ he said of his brother’s death.

A fatal shooting and lawsuit for excessive force: What we know about the four officers fired for George Floyd’s arrest

Derek Chauvin

In 2006 Derek Chauvin (pictured), 44, was one of six officers connected to the death of Wayne Reyes

In 2006 Derek Chauvin (pictured), 44, was one of six officers connected to the death of Wayne Reyes

The white police officer who knelt on George Floyd’s neck has already been investigated over three police shootings and a fatal car chase.

In 2006 Derek Chauvin, 44, was one of six officers connected to the death of Wayne Reyes.

Reyes, 42 was killed by officers after allegedly pulling a shotgun on the six cops, which included Chauvin.

Also that year he was named in a lawsuit filed by an inmate at the Minnesota Correctional Facility. The case was dismissed in 2007. 

Two years later Chauvin was investigated for his role in the 2008 shooting of Ira Latrell Toles during a domestic assault call.

Toles was wounded after police said he went for an officer’s gun and Chauvin shot him.

That same year Chauvin was handed a medal of valor for ‘his response in an incident involving a man armed with a gun.’ 

But in 2011 23-year-old Leroy Martinez was shot and injured during a chase given by officers including Chauvin.

Chauvin was arrested Friday – four days after Floyd’s death – and charged with third degree murder and manslaughter. 

Tou Thao

Tou Thao (pictured), was part of a $25,000 out of court settlement after being sued for using excessive force in 2017

Tou Thao (pictured), was part of a $25,000 out of court settlement after being sued for using excessive force in 2017

Tou Thao, was part of a $25,000 out of court settlement after being sued for using excessive force in 2017.

A lawsuit obtained by the DailyMail.com shows Thao was sued for using excessive force in arrest where he was accused of punching and kicking a handcuffed suspect ‘until his teeth broke’.

The remaining two officers have been identified as Thomas Lane and J Alexander Kueng.

Both were reportedly rookie cops who were still in their probationary periods.

Thao, Lane and Kueng do not currently face charges. 

‘I just don’t understand, man.

‘Why we gotta go through this? Why we gotta go through this pain, man?

‘I love my brother. I’m never going to see him again.’

DailyMail.com has sought comment from the White House.

During a news conference at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida, on Saturday, the president said he expressed sympathy to the Floyd family.

‘Yesterday, I spoke to George’s family and expressed the sorrow of our entire nation for their loss,’ Trump said.

‘I stand before you as a friend and ally to every American seeking justice and peace, and I stand before you in firm opposition to anyone exploiting this tragedy to loot, rob, and menace.

‘Healing not hatred, justice not chaos are the mission at hand.’

The president has been criticized for several tweets that seemed to vow a harsh crackdown against protesters, including one in which he referred to rioters and demonstrators as ‘thugs’ and warning that ‘when the looting starts, the shooting starts.’

On Saturday, however, the president tried to strike a different note.

‘I understand the pain that people are feeling,’ Trump said.

‘We support the right of peaceful protests and we hear their pleas, but what we are now seeing on the streets of our cities has nothing to do with the memory of George Floyd.

‘The violence and vandalism is being led by Antifa and other radical left-wing groups who are terrorizing the innocent, destroying jobs, hurting businesses and burning down buildings.

‘The main victims of this horrible, horrible situation are the citizens who live in these once-lovely communities… The mobs are devastating the life’s work of good people and destroying their dreams.

‘We support the overwhelming majority of police officers who are incredible in every way and devoted to public service.’

Derek Chauvin, the Minneapolis police officer who was filmed pressing his knee against George Floyd’s neck while he struggled to breathe and was handcuffed, has been charged with third-degree murder and manslaughter.

During his interview on MSNBC, Philonise Floyd was angry that authorities in Minnesota have yet to charge the other three police officers involved in his brother’s death.

The family is also seeking more serious charges against Chauvin, who ignored Floyd’s desperate pleas while he was suffocating.

Those three officers – Alexander Kueng, Thomas Lane and Tou Thao – have all been fired by the Minneapolis Police Department.

‘They all need to be convicted of first-degree murder, and given the death penalty because they didn’t care about what they wanted to do with my brother,’ Philonise Floyd told MSNBC.

‘[George Floyd] wasn’t a person to them, he was scum. He was nothing.

‘I can imagine how many people they did like that. I don’t need them on the streets to kill anybody else.

‘I’m hurt, my family is hurt. His kids are hurt.

‘They will grow up without a father.’

Philonise Floyd added: ‘Everybody is crying and in pain right now. So if they could do anything please arrest those other officers.’

Sharpton said he will travel to Minneapolis to deliver the eulogy at George Floyd’s funeral, though the MSNBC host misspoke.

Floyd’s funeral will be held in his hometown of Houston, Texas, according to Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner. A date and time have yet to be scheduled.

White cop charged with murdering George Floyd is on ‘suicide watch’ and being checked around the clock

Chauvin, the white police officer arrested and charged with the murder of George Floyd, is allegedly on effective suicide watch and being checked in on around the clock. 

TMZ reported Saturday that Chauvin, 44, has a camera focused on him all day and and cops check on his cell in person every 15 minutes. 

It adds that Chauvin, who was charged with third-degree murder and manslaughter on Friday, is under constant surveillance and is in isolation in Ramsey County Jail in St. Paul, Minnesota. 

Former cop Derek Chauvin, who was arrested for the murder of George Floyd on Friday, is reported to be on suicide watch in his single cell in Ramsey County Jail and under constant surveillance

Former cop Derek Chauvin, who was arrested for the murder of George Floyd on Friday, is reported to be on suicide watch in his single cell in Ramsey County Jail and under constant surveillance

George Floyd's (pictured) heartbroken family have called white cop Derek Chauvin to be charged with a more serious crime than third-degree murder

George Floyd

George Floyd’s (pictured) heartbroken family have called white cop Derek Chauvin to be charged with a more serious crime than third-degree murder after their lawyer revealed that Chauvin knelt on Floyd’s neck for a staggering eight minutes during the arrest for forgery

He remains in a single cell in a part of the facility set aside for high-profile cases. 

TMZ adds that a source says that the former police officer didn’t make eye contact with anyone when he was brought into the jail on Friday and that he was subject to an unclothed body search. 

He was then placed in a prison uniform and led to his cell. 

Checks on a cell every 15 minutes are said to be common in such a high-profile case, TMZ’s source said, but it is not confirmed if there is a threat to Chauvin’s life. 

Chauvin is reported to have 23 hours in his cell a day with one hour for recreation. He also has access to books, pencils and paper. 

Footage emerged Monday of white cop Chauvin kneeling on the neck of black man Floyd for more than eight minutes until he passed out and later died, sparking outrage over police brutality and seeing protests escalate across the nation.

Chauvin was taken into custody on Friday and charged with third-degree murder and manslaughter. His bail was set for $500,000. 

The Ramsey County Law Enforcement Center and adjoining adult detention center where disgraced former cop Derek Chauvin is being held for the murder of George Floyd

The Ramsey County Law Enforcement Center and adjoining adult detention center where disgraced former cop Derek Chauvin is being held for the murder of George Floyd

The arrest followed days of nationwide protests and riots demanding his arrest, after he was caught on video kneeling on Floyd’s neck while arresting him for allegedly trying to use a counterfeit $20 bill at a deli.

According to the criminal complaint against Chauvin, the Minneapolis police officer was said to have had his knee on Floyd’s neck for eight minutes and 46 seconds, with nearly three minutes of the time being after Floyd had become non-responsive. 

Floyd was then taken to the hospital where he was pronounced dead.

On Thursday evening it was revealed Floyd had actually worked with Chauvin as security guards at the El Nuevo Rodeo club, the club owner confirmed.

‘Chauvin was our off-duty police for almost the entirety of the 17 years that we were open,’ Maya Santamaria told KSTP-TV. 

Three other officers involved in Floyd’s arrest remain uncharged but were also fired from their jobs Tuesday. 

Protesters and Floyd’s family continue to call for the arrests of former officers J Alexander Kueng, Thomas Lane and Tou Thao and for a more serious charge to be brought against Chauvin. 

‘We call on authorities to revise the charges [against Chauvin] to reflect the culpability of this officer,’ a statement from the family Friday said. 

‘We fully expect to see the other officers who did nothing to protect the life of George Floyd to be arrested and charged soon.’

The criminal complaint filed against Chauvin Friday also cited the preliminary findings from a Tuesday autopsy conducted by the Hennepin County Medical Examiner which saw ‘no physical findings that support a diagnosis of traumatic asphyxiation or strangulation’.

George Floyd, a 46-year-old black man, died on Memorial Day as he was arrested by four police officers over allegedly trying to buy cigarettes with a counterfeit $20 bill

He was seen in a video pleading that he couldn't breathe as white officer Derek Chauvin pressed his knee against his neck

George Floyd, a 46-year-old black man, died on Memorial Day as he was arrested by four police officers over allegedly trying to buy cigarettes with a counterfeit $20 bill. He was seen in a video pleading that he couldn’t breathe as white officer Derek Chauvin pressed his knee against his neck

‘Mr. Floyd had underlying health conditions including coronary artery disease and hypertensive heart disease,’ said the complaint from the Hennepin County Attorney.

‘The combined effects of Mr. Floyd being restrained by police, his underlying health conditions and any potential intoxicants in his system likely contributed to his death.’

The full medical examiner’s report is pending but Floyd’s family have hired the services of former New York medical officer Dr. Michael Baden to perform a second independent autopsy. 

They are unhappy with the findings from the county medical examiner that they claim create an ‘illusion’ of underlying health conditions being responsible for his death.     

Donald Trump doubles down on blaming the ‘radical left and ANTIFA’ for George Floyd protests


Donald Trump has doubled down on blaming the ‘radical left and ANTIFA’ for George Floyd protests across America and warned he will stop ‘mob violence cold’ as Secret Service agents in riot gear clash with demonstrators outside the White House for a second day.  

Speaking at Cape Canaveral after the successful launch of Elon Musk’s Space X rocket, Trump blasted what he called the ‘rioters, looters and anarchists’ that have taken to the streets of at least 30 cities this week to demand justice over Floyd’s death and warned them that ‘there will be no anarchy’.  

‘The memory of George Floyd is being dishonored by rioters, looters and anarchists,’ he told crowds.  

‘The violence and vandalism is being led by ANTIFA and other radical left wing groups who are terrorizing the innocent, destroying jobs, hurting businesses and burning down buildings.’ 

His comments come as tensions started building between protesters and law enforcement in Washington DC for a second day Saturday leading the District of Columbia to call in the National Guard.

This followed similar scenes Friday which forced the White House to go into an emergency lockdown when some demonstrators tried to scale the walls of the grounds. 

Donald Trump has doubled down on blaming the ‘radical left and ANTIFA’ for George Floyd protests across America and warned he will stop ‘mob violence cold’ as Secret Service in riot gear clash with demonstrators outside the White House for a second day

Trump blasted the crowds of protesters as ‘mobs’ and ‘criminals’.

‘The mobs are devastating the life’s work of good people and destroying their dreams,’ he slammed. 

He then gave a chilling threat to protesters that they will be stopped ‘cold’ by his administration – a day after he sparked outrage for making the inflammatory statement that ‘when the looting starts the shooting starts’ and the same day he tweeted that anyone scaling the White House grounds would be faced with ‘ominous weapons’. 

‘My administration will stop mob violence and stop it cold,’ he said Saturday. 

‘We must not allow a small group of criminals and vandals to wreck our cities and lay waste to our communities.’ 

The president made another thinly-veiled dig at Minneapolis officials over their response to the mounting tensions between law enforcement and demonstrators in the city where Floyd died, saying it ‘does not serve the interest of justice’ for officials to ‘give in’ to protesters.

‘It does not serve the interest of justice or any city of any race, color or creed for that government to give in to anarchy, abandon police precincts or allow communities to be burned to the ground,’ he said. ‘It won’t happen.’

A second day of protests turned ugly at the White House Saturday

A second day of protests turned ugly at the White House Saturday

At least three Secret Service vehicles were seen with their windows smashed and with profanities scrawled on the side of them

At least three Secret Service vehicles were seen with their windows smashed and with profanities scrawled on the side of them

Protesters chanted 'Black Lives Matter' and 'I can't breathe' - some of the last words Floyd said before he died

Protesters chanted ‘Black Lives Matter’ and ‘I can’t breathe’ – some of the last words Floyd said before he died

The president had warned Thursday in a Twitter post that he would ‘assume control’ of the situation in the city and leveled blame at ‘weak’ Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey after protests descended into widespread carnage and left the city torched to the ground. 

On Thursday night, Minneapolis police officers had been forced to flee the third precinct when it was stormed and set alight when peaceful protests turned violent.

The president went on to blast people taking part in violent protests as ‘dishonoring George Floyd’s memory’. 

‘We support the right of peaceful protesters and we hear their pleas but what we are now seeing on the streets of our cities has nothing to do with justice or peace,’ he said. 

He continued: ‘We must not allow a small group of criminals and vandals to wreck our cities and lay waste to our communities.

‘We must defend the right of every citizen to live without violence, prejudice or fear.’ 

Speaking at Cape Canaveral after the successful launch of Elon Musk's Space X rocket, Trump blasted what he called the 'rioters, looters and anarchists' that have taken to the streets of at least 30 cities this week to demand justice over Floyd's death and warned that 'there will be no anarchy'

Speaking at Cape Canaveral after the successful launch of Elon Musk’s Space X rocket, Trump blasted what he called the ‘rioters, looters and anarchists’ that have taken to the streets of at least 30 cities this week to demand justice over Floyd’s death and warned that ‘there will be no anarchy’

Footage emerged Monday of white cop Derek Chauvin kneeling on the neck of black man Floyd for more than eight minutes until he passed out and later died, sparking outrage over police brutality and seeing protests escalate across the nation.

Trump described Floyd’s killing as a ‘grave tragedy’ at Cape Canaveral. 

‘The death of George Floyd on the streets of Minneapolis was a grave tragedy.

‘It should never have happened it has filled Americans all over the country with horror, anger and grief,’ he said.

‘Yesterday I spoke to George’s family and expressed the sorrow of our entire nation for their loss.’  

He added that the investigation into Floyd’s death is ongoing, hinting that charges could be leveled at the other three police officers involved. 

Trump's comments come as tensions started building between protesters and law enforcement in Washington DC for a second day Saturday

Trump’s comments come as tensions started building between protesters and law enforcement in Washington DC for a second day Saturday

Things turned ugly again Saturday, following the events of Friday which forced the White House into a temporary lockdown when some demonstrators tried to scale the walls of the grounds

Things turned ugly again Saturday, following the events of Friday which forced the White House into a temporary lockdown when some demonstrators tried to scale the walls of the grounds

Chauvin was arrested and charged with murder and manslaughter Friday but the other three still walk free. 

‘The police officers involved have been fired from their jobs, one of them has already been arrested and charged with murder,’ he said.

‘State and federal authorities are carrying out an investigation to see what further charges may be warranted including against sadly the other three.

‘In addition my administration has opened a civil rights investigation and I have asked the attorney general and the justice department to expedite it.’ 

Trump went on to point to the Space X launch as a sign of what America can achieve by coming ‘together’.

‘Moments ago we witnessed the launch of two great American astronauts into space. We were filled with the sense of pride and community in what brings us together as Americans,’ he said.  

Trump’s comments came just hours after he first pointed the finger at the radical left for the protests turning violent this week. 

‘It’s ANTIFA and the Radical Left. Don’t lay the blame on others!’ Trump said in a tweet on Saturday, referring to the militant far-left movement, short for ‘anti-fascist’, that is known for violence. 

His comments were echoed by Attorney General Bill Barr who also said ‘the voices of peaceful protest are being hijacked by radical elements.’ 

‘Groups of outside radicals and agitators are exploiting the situation to pursue their own separate and violent agenda,’ Barr said in an on-camera statement. ‘In many places it appears the violence is planned, organized and driven by anarchic and far-left extremist groups using antifa-like tactics.’

‘It is a federal crime to cross state lines or use interstate facilities to incite or participate in violent rioting and we will enforce those laws,’ he added, saying that the FBI, US Marshals, DEA, ATF and U.S. Attorney’s Offices would fully support local and state law enforcement in restoring order and cracking down on violence. 

While the president celebrated the successful space flight, back at the White House, protesters surrounded the seat of the US government for a second day and clashes broke out between the crowds and Secret Service agents.

Several demonstrators were seen standing on top of Secret Service vehicles and a security booth near the Eisenhower Executive Office Building.  

At least three Secret Service vehicles were seen with their windows smashed and with profanities scrawled on the side of them.

Protesters stood on the hoods and roofs and chanted ‘Black Lives Matter’ and ‘I can’t breathe’ – some of the last words Floyd said before he died.

Back at the White House, protesters have surrounded the seat of the US government for a second day and clashes have started breaking out between the crowds and Secret Service agents

Back at the White House, protesters have surrounded the seat of the US government for a second day and clashes have started breaking out between the crowds and Secret Service agents

Several demonstrators were seen standing on top of Secret Service vehicles and a security booth near the Eisenhower Executive Office Building

Several demonstrators were seen standing on top of Secret Service vehicles and a security booth near the Eisenhower Executive Office Building

The protests first reached the seat of the US government Friday night, with demonstrators marching to the White House, sending it into an emergency lockdown for a brief time. 

Secret Service officers stopped anyone entering the White House grounds, where Trump was in residence, after a demonstrator tried to scale the fence in Lafayette Park to get inside. 

The man was manhandled by Secret Service out of the park and taken into custody at the Treasury Annex.

Crowds followed law enforcement and the man to the jail and staged another protest outside – this one calling for a medic for the man after he was seen with blood pouring down his face, sparking renewed fears over police brutality and for the safety of a man held in police custody. 

Secret Service agents were also seen physically pushing demonstrators back after some pushed down metal railings while a police cruiser was seen burning in the road after it was torched by rioters.  

The lockdown was later lifted around 8:30p.m. and Trump broke his silence over the situation Saturday saying he ‘couldn’t have felt more safe’ and saying that any protesters who made it into the grounds would have been met with ‘the most vicious dogs, and most ominous weapons’. 

‘Great job last night at the White House by the U.S. @SecretService. They were not only totally professional, but very cool. I was inside, watched every move, and couldn’t have felt more safe. They let the ‘protesters’ scream & rant as much as they wanted, but whenever someone got too frisky or out of line, they would quickly come down on them, hard – didn’t know what hit them,’ he tweeted.

‘The front line was replaced with fresh agents, like magic. Big crowd, professionally organized, but nobody came close to breaching the fence. If they had they would. have been greeted with the most vicious dogs, and most ominous weapons, I have ever seen. 

‘That’s when people would have been really badly hurt, at least. Many Secret Service agents just waiting for action.’ 

Donald Trump doubles down on blaming the ‘radical left and ANTIFA’ for George Floyd protests


Donald Trump has doubled down on blaming the ‘radical left and ANTIFA’ for George Floyd protests across America and warned he will stop ‘mob violence cold’ as Secret Service agents in riot gear clash with demonstrators outside the White House for a second day.  

Speaking at Cape Canaveral after the successful launch of Elon Musk’s Space X rocket, Trump blasted what he called the ‘rioters, looters and anarchists’ that have taken to the streets of at least 30 cities this week to demand justice over Floyd’s death and warned them that ‘there will be no anarchy’.  

‘The memory of George Floyd is being dishonored by rioters, looters and anarchists,’ he told crowds.  

‘The violence and vandalism is being led by ANTIFA and other radical left wing groups who are terrorizing the innocent, destroying jobs, hurting businesses and burning down buildings.’ 

His comments come as tensions started building between protesters and law enforcement in Washington DC for a second day Saturday leading the District of Columbia to call in the National Guard.

This followed similar scenes Friday which forced the White House to go into an emergency lockdown when some demonstrators tried to scale the walls of the grounds. 

Donald Trump has doubled down on blaming the ‘radical left and ANTIFA’ for George Floyd protests across America and warned he will stop ‘mob violence cold’ as Secret Service in riot gear clash with demonstrators outside the White House for a second day

Trump blasted the crowds of protesters as ‘mobs’ and ‘criminals’.

‘The mobs are devastating the life’s work of good people and destroying their dreams,’ he slammed. 

He then gave a chilling threat to protesters that they will be stopped ‘cold’ by his administration – a day after he sparked outrage for making the inflammatory statement that ‘when the looting starts the shooting starts’ and the same day he tweeted that anyone scaling the White House grounds would be faced with ‘ominous weapons’. 

‘My administration will stop mob violence and stop it cold,’ he said Saturday. 

‘We must not allow a small group of criminals and vandals to wreck our cities and lay waste to our communities.’ 

The president made another thinly-veiled dig at Minneapolis officials over their response to the mounting tensions between law enforcement and demonstrators in the city where Floyd died, saying it ‘does not serve the interest of justice’ for officials to ‘give in’ to protesters.

‘It does not serve the interest of justice or any city of any race, color or creed for that government to give in to anarchy, abandon police precincts or allow communities to be burned to the ground,’ he said. ‘It won’t happen.’

A second day of protests turned ugly at the White House Saturday

A second day of protests turned ugly at the White House Saturday

At least three Secret Service vehicles were seen with their windows smashed and with profanities scrawled on the side of them

At least three Secret Service vehicles were seen with their windows smashed and with profanities scrawled on the side of them

Protesters chanted 'Black Lives Matter' and 'I can't breathe' - some of the last words Floyd said before he died

Protesters chanted ‘Black Lives Matter’ and ‘I can’t breathe’ – some of the last words Floyd said before he died

The president had warned Thursday in a Twitter post that he would ‘assume control’ of the situation in the city and leveled blame at ‘weak’ Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey after protests descended into widespread carnage and left the city torched to the ground. 

On Thursday night, Minneapolis police officers had been forced to flee the third precinct when it was stormed and set alight when peaceful protests turned violent.

The president went on to blast people taking part in violent protests as ‘dishonoring George Floyd’s memory’. 

‘We support the right of peaceful protesters and we hear their pleas but what we are now seeing on the streets of our cities has nothing to do with justice or peace,’ he said. 

He continued: ‘We must not allow a small group of criminals and vandals to wreck our cities and lay waste to our communities.

‘We must defend the right of every citizen to live without violence, prejudice or fear.’ 

Speaking at Cape Canaveral after the successful launch of Elon Musk's Space X rocket, Trump blasted what he called the 'rioters, looters and anarchists' that have taken to the streets of at least 30 cities this week to demand justice over Floyd's death and warned that 'there will be no anarchy'

Speaking at Cape Canaveral after the successful launch of Elon Musk’s Space X rocket, Trump blasted what he called the ‘rioters, looters and anarchists’ that have taken to the streets of at least 30 cities this week to demand justice over Floyd’s death and warned that ‘there will be no anarchy’

Footage emerged Monday of white cop Derek Chauvin kneeling on the neck of black man Floyd for more than eight minutes until he passed out and later died, sparking outrage over police brutality and seeing protests escalate across the nation.

Trump described Floyd’s killing as a ‘grave tragedy’ at Cape Canaveral. 

‘The death of George Floyd on the streets of Minneapolis was a grave tragedy.

‘It should never have happened it has filled Americans all over the country with horror, anger and grief,’ he said.

‘Yesterday I spoke to George’s family and expressed the sorrow of our entire nation for their loss.’  

He added that the investigation into Floyd’s death is ongoing, hinting that charges could be leveled at the other three police officers involved. 

Trump's comments come as tensions started building between protesters and law enforcement in Washington DC for a second day Saturday

Trump’s comments come as tensions started building between protesters and law enforcement in Washington DC for a second day Saturday

Things turned ugly again Saturday, following the events of Friday which forced the White House into a temporary lockdown when some demonstrators tried to scale the walls of the grounds

Things turned ugly again Saturday, following the events of Friday which forced the White House into a temporary lockdown when some demonstrators tried to scale the walls of the grounds

Chauvin was arrested and charged with murder and manslaughter Friday but the other three still walk free. 

‘The police officers involved have been fired from their jobs, one of them has already been arrested and charged with murder,’ he said.

‘State and federal authorities are carrying out an investigation to see what further charges may be warranted including against sadly the other three.

‘In addition my administration has opened a civil rights investigation and I have asked the attorney general and the justice department to expedite it.’ 

Trump went on to point to the Space X launch as a sign of what America can achieve by coming ‘together’.

‘Moments ago we witnessed the launch of two great American astronauts into space. We were filled with the sense of pride and community in what brings us together as Americans,’ he said.  

Trump’s comments came just hours after he first pointed the finger at the radical left for the protests turning violent this week. 

‘It’s ANTIFA and the Radical Left. Don’t lay the blame on others!’ Trump said in a tweet on Saturday, referring to the militant far-left movement, short for ‘anti-fascist’, that is known for violence. 

His comments were echoed by Attorney General Bill Barr who also said ‘the voices of peaceful protest are being hijacked by radical elements.’ 

‘Groups of outside radicals and agitators are exploiting the situation to pursue their own separate and violent agenda,’ Barr said in an on-camera statement. ‘In many places it appears the violence is planned, organized and driven by anarchic and far-left extremist groups using antifa-like tactics.’

‘It is a federal crime to cross state lines or use interstate facilities to incite or participate in violent rioting and we will enforce those laws,’ he added, saying that the FBI, US Marshals, DEA, ATF and U.S. Attorney’s Offices would fully support local and state law enforcement in restoring order and cracking down on violence. 

While the president celebrated the successful space flight, back at the White House, protesters surrounded the seat of the US government for a second day and clashes broke out between the crowds and Secret Service agents.

Several demonstrators were seen standing on top of Secret Service vehicles and a security booth near the Eisenhower Executive Office Building.  

At least three Secret Service vehicles were seen with their windows smashed and with profanities scrawled on the side of them.

Protesters stood on the hoods and roofs and chanted ‘Black Lives Matter’ and ‘I can’t breathe’ – some of the last words Floyd said before he died.

Back at the White House, protesters have surrounded the seat of the US government for a second day and clashes have started breaking out between the crowds and Secret Service agents

Back at the White House, protesters have surrounded the seat of the US government for a second day and clashes have started breaking out between the crowds and Secret Service agents

Several demonstrators were seen standing on top of Secret Service vehicles and a security booth near the Eisenhower Executive Office Building

Several demonstrators were seen standing on top of Secret Service vehicles and a security booth near the Eisenhower Executive Office Building

The protests first reached the seat of the US government Friday night, with demonstrators marching to the White House, sending it into an emergency lockdown for a brief time. 

Secret Service officers stopped anyone entering the White House grounds, where Trump was in residence, after a demonstrator tried to scale the fence in Lafayette Park to get inside. 

The man was manhandled by Secret Service out of the park and taken into custody at the Treasury Annex.

Crowds followed law enforcement and the man to the jail and staged another protest outside – this one calling for a medic for the man after he was seen with blood pouring down his face, sparking renewed fears over police brutality and for the safety of a man held in police custody. 

Secret Service agents were also seen physically pushing demonstrators back after some pushed down metal railings while a police cruiser was seen burning in the road after it was torched by rioters.  

The lockdown was later lifted around 8:30p.m. and Trump broke his silence over the situation Saturday saying he ‘couldn’t have felt more safe’ and saying that any protesters who made it into the grounds would have been met with ‘the most vicious dogs, and most ominous weapons’. 

‘Great job last night at the White House by the U.S. @SecretService. They were not only totally professional, but very cool. I was inside, watched every move, and couldn’t have felt more safe. They let the ‘protesters’ scream & rant as much as they wanted, but whenever someone got too frisky or out of line, they would quickly come down on them, hard – didn’t know what hit them,’ he tweeted.

‘The front line was replaced with fresh agents, like magic. Big crowd, professionally organized, but nobody came close to breaching the fence. If they had they would. have been greeted with the most vicious dogs, and most ominous weapons, I have ever seen. 

‘That’s when people would have been really badly hurt, at least. Many Secret Service agents just waiting for action.’