Batteries in smartphones connected to 5G lose their charge as much as 50% faster, new study says


5G smartphones could become up to 50 times more battery efficient with new radio frequency switching system funded by the US Army

  • Army-backed researchers developed a way to make 5G less of a battery drain
  • The new design uses nanomaterials to make switching between 5G and other radio frequencies for other phone tasks less energy intensive
  • Early 5G smartphones  have been as much as 50% more battery hungry

The US Army is funding new technology that could improve the battery performance on smartphones with 5G connections by a factor of 50.

The project was led by a team of engineers at the University of Texas at Austin and the University of Lille in France, with funding from the Army Research Office.

Working with a new nanomaterial design, the team was able to improve battery performance for 5G connected devices by creating a more efficient switching system as they alternate between 5G signs and other radio frequencies.

Engineers from University of Texas at Austin and the University of Lille in France received funding from the US Army to develop a new system of radio frequency switches to help make 5G phones less battery intensive

‘It has become clear that the existing switches consume significant amounts of power, and that power consumed is useless power,’ the University of Texas Austin’s Dr. Deji Akinwande said in a statement.

‘The switch we have developed can transmit an HDTV stream at a 100GHz frequency, and that is an achievement in broadband switch technology.’

In preliminary user testing, 5G phones have been especially battery hungry, with the Samsung Galaxy S10 5G losing 50% of its battery power in just four hours of 5G connection, despite promising 18 hours of battery life.

The issue is partly due to the need to maintain connections to both 3G or LTE networks for basic phone functioning while also keeping a connection to more data intensive 5G signal for other data-heavy tasks.

The basic connections a smartphone maintains at any given time are governed by a system of radio frequency switches that direct which of the devices receivers to activate for a given task, according to a report in Popular Mechanics.

The current generation of 5G smartphones can be surprisingly inefficient, with Samsung's  Galaxy S10 5G losing 50% of its 18-hour battery life in just four hours of 5G use

The current generation of 5G smartphones can be surprisingly inefficient, with Samsung’s  Galaxy S10 5G losing 50% of its 18-hour battery life in just four hours of 5G use

The main cause of battery drain for 5G devices is the system of switches that govern when a device should switch between Wifi, 5G, 4G, 3G, LTE, Bluetooth, or another radio signal for a certain task. The Army project uses an ultra-thin nanomaterial to make this more efficient

The main cause of battery drain for 5G devices is the system of switches that govern when a device should switch between Wifi, 5G, 4G, 3G, LTE, Bluetooth, or another radio signal for a certain task. The Army project uses an ultra-thin nanomaterial to make this more efficient

These switches determine when a device should switch from Wifi, 5G, 4G, 3G, LTE, or Bluetooth, and consumes small amounts of processing power and battery power to constantly shift back and forth depending on the required task.

The new Army-funded design for these sets of switches is centered around hexagonal boron nitride, a nanomaterial that’s described as the world’s thinnest insulator.

Because hexagonal boron nitride can be laid out in layers that are the thickness of a single atom, they can transfer energy much more efficiently than conventional switches.

They also work with radio signals that cover the full 5G spectrum, rather than just the low end parts of the spectrum that earlier experiments with switch efficiency achieved.

The Army say it’s hoping to apply the technology to a range of 5G compatible devices, including smart radios, satellite systems, and other ‘Internet of Things’ devices that could be used in the field.

WHAT IS 5G AND WHAT DOES IT DO?

The evolution of the G system started in 1980 with the invention of the mobile phone which allowed for analogue data to be transmitted via phone calls.   

Digital came into play in 1991 with 2G and SMS and MMS capabilities were launched. 

Since then, the capabilities and carrying capacity for the mobile network has increased massively. 

More data can be transferred from one point to another via the mobile network quicker than ever.

5G is expected to be 100 times faster than the currently used 4G. 

Whilst the jump from 3G to 4G was most beneficial for mobile browsing and working, the step to 5G will be so fast they become almost real-time. 

That means mobile operations will be just as fast as office-based internet connections.

Potential uses for 5g include: 

  • Simultaneous translation of several languages in a party conference call 
  • Self-driving cars can stream movies, music and navigation information from the cloud
  • A full length 8GB film can be downloaded in six seconds. 

5G is expected to be so quick and efficient it is possible it could start the end of wired connections.  

By the end of 2020, industry estimates claim 50 billion devices will be connected to 5G.

The evolution of from 1G to 5G. The predicted speed of 5G is more than 1Gbps - 1,000 times greater than the existing speed of 4G and could be implemented in laptops of the future 

The evolution of from 1G to 5G. The predicted speed of 5G is more than 1Gbps – 1,000 times greater than the existing speed of 4G and could be implemented in laptops of the future 

Ocean’s Eleven-style gang member who stole £4m gems from Mayfair jewellers jailed for four years


A gang member who stole £4million worth of gems from a Mayfair jewellers in one of the biggest shoplifting thefts in British criminal history has been jailed for nearly four years.

Mickael Jovanovic was part of a crack team who tricked staff at Boodles into handing over precious jewels then used sleight of hand to swap the diamonds for pebbles.

The 27-year-old and his accomplices then fled to their native France within hours of the heist in 2016, and evaded capture until this year.

Following an international manhunt, Jovanovic was extradited from Italy and arrested in January and charged the same day with conspiracy to steal.

Police likened the ‘truly audacious crime’ to daring thefts portrayed in Hollywood movies.

Mickael Jovanovic was part of a crack team of criminals who tricked staff at Boodles into handing over £4million worth of jewels. The 27-year-old, from Le Blanc-Mesnil in France, was jailed for three years and eight months

A Boodles director was invited to a meeting in Monaco in March 2016 by members of the group posing as Russian businessmen, who struck a deal to buy seven diamonds – including a heart-shaped jewel worth £2.2m.

Boodles received a phone call stating that the buyers’ representative, a gemmologist named ‘Anna’, would be attending the Mayfair shop under the pretence of appraising the diamonds. 

Boodles’ gemmologist Emma Barton met with ‘Anna’ who was taken to the basement of the jewellery store for a viewing on March 10.

Prosecutor Philip Stott told Southwark Crown Court how ‘Anna’ entered Boodles to view the diamonds and waited for a diversional telephone call from one of her accomplices.

She swapped the gems for pebbles and slipped the stones into pre-cut tissue paper, placing them inside opaque boxes she had brought with her.

The padlocked bag containing the ‘diamonds’ was then returned to the safe. 

After leaving the shop, Anna met up with her associates on the street and handed the diamonds over before the group split up.

Within three hours of the theft, they had all returned to France either by train or car.

The following day, the Boodles director spoke with the fake buyer, who confirmed the money would be transferred.

But suspicious staff x-rayed the bag then opened it to discover they had been left with pebbles, the court heard.

Jovanovic and another man, Christophe Stankovic, had carried out surveillance on Boodles and were loitering nearby on the day of the theft.

Two women had acted as lookouts for ‘Anna’ while a third woman was standing by with a change of clothes at a pub near Victoria Station.

Mr Stott said the 2016 theft was ‘of the highest possible sophistication, planning, risk, and reward’, adding it is thought to be the largest value single incident of shoplifting in British criminal history. 

Flying Squad detectives launched an investigation and retraced the group’s movements across London as they plotted the heist.

The gang had used minicabs in a bid to hide their movements but their departure from the country was quickly established.

Their images were circulated to other police forces before Jovanovic was extradited from Italy in January and arrested. He was charged the same day and admitted conspiracy to steal.

Jovanovic, of Le Blanc-Mesnil, a suburb in north eastern Paris, was jailed for three years and eight months’ imprisonment at Southwark Crown Court.

Stankovic was caught and jailed in 2016.

A Boodles director was invited to a meeting in Monaco in March 2016 by members of the group posing as Russian businessmen, who struck a deal to buy seven diamonds - including a heart-shaped jewel worth £2.2m

A Boodles director was invited to a meeting in Monaco in March 2016 by members of the group posing as Russian businessmen, who struck a deal to buy seven diamonds – including a heart-shaped jewel worth £2.2m

Detective Constable William Man said: ‘This was a well organised theft which evolved over a number of weeks both in London and on the continent

‘Like the plot of a film, this was a truly audacious crime. They stole the diamonds and fled in a matter of hours. However, they left behind a trail of evidence which led us to where they were staying, and the Citroen they had hired in Paris.

‘As a result of piecing together all of the bits of information, we knew it was only a matter of time before arrests were made.

‘And whilst it has taken four years, this case does highlight that we won’t give up. We still remain determined to identify all of those involved.’  

Ocean’s Eleven-style gang member who stole £4m gems from Mayfair jewellers jailed for four years


A gang member who stole £4million worth of gems from a Mayfair jewellers in one of the biggest shoplifting thefts in British criminal history has been jailed for nearly four years.

Mickael Jovanovic was part of a crack team who tricked staff at Boodles into handing over precious jewels then used sleight of hand to swap the diamonds for pebbles.

The 27-year-old and his accomplices then fled to their native France within hours of the heist in 2016, and evaded capture until this year.

Following an international manhunt, Jovanovic was extradited from Italy and arrested in January and charged the same day with conspiracy to steal.

Police likened the ‘truly audacious crime’ to daring thefts portrayed in Hollywood movies.

Mickael Jovanovic was part of a crack team of criminals who tricked staff at Boodles into handing over £4million worth of jewels. The 27-year-old, from Le Blanc-Mesnil in France, was jailed for three years and eight months

A Boodles director was invited to a meeting in Monaco in March 2016 by members of the group posing as Russian businessmen, who struck a deal to buy seven diamonds – including a heart-shaped jewel worth £2.2m.

Boodles received a phone call stating that the buyers’ representative, a gemmologist named ‘Anna’, would be attending the Mayfair shop under the pretence of appraising the diamonds. 

Boodles’ gemmologist Emma Barton met with ‘Anna’ who was taken to the basement of the jewellery store for a viewing on March 10.

Prosecutor Philip Stott told Southwark Crown Court how ‘Anna’ entered Boodles to view the diamonds and waited for a diversional telephone call from one of her accomplices.

She swapped the gems for pebbles and slipped the stones into pre-cut tissue paper, placing them inside opaque boxes she had brought with her.

The padlocked bag containing the ‘diamonds’ was then returned to the safe. 

After leaving the shop, Anna met up with her associates on the street and handed the diamonds over before the group split up.

Within three hours of the theft, they had all returned to France either by train or car.

The following day, the Boodles director spoke with the fake buyer, who confirmed the money would be transferred.

But suspicious staff x-rayed the bag then opened it to discover they had been left with pebbles, the court heard.

Jovanovic and another man, Christophe Stankovic, had carried out surveillance on Boodles and were loitering nearby on the day of the theft.

Two women had acted as lookouts for ‘Anna’ while a third woman was standing by with a change of clothes at a pub near Victoria Station.

Mr Stott said the 2016 theft was ‘of the highest possible sophistication, planning, risk, and reward’, adding it is thought to be the largest value single incident of shoplifting in British criminal history. 

Flying Squad detectives launched an investigation and retraced the group’s movements across London as they plotted the heist.

The gang had used minicabs in a bid to hide their movements but their departure from the country was quickly established.

Their images were circulated to other police forces before Jovanovic was extradited from Italy in January and arrested. He was charged the same day and admitted conspiracy to steal.

Jovanovic, of Le Blanc-Mesnil, a suburb in north eastern Paris, was jailed for three years and eight months’ imprisonment at Southwark Crown Court.

Stankovic was caught and jailed in 2016.

A Boodles director was invited to a meeting in Monaco in March 2016 by members of the group posing as Russian businessmen, who struck a deal to buy seven diamonds - including a heart-shaped jewel worth £2.2m

A Boodles director was invited to a meeting in Monaco in March 2016 by members of the group posing as Russian businessmen, who struck a deal to buy seven diamonds – including a heart-shaped jewel worth £2.2m

Detective Constable William Man said: ‘This was a well organised theft which evolved over a number of weeks both in London and on the continent

‘Like the plot of a film, this was a truly audacious crime. They stole the diamonds and fled in a matter of hours. However, they left behind a trail of evidence which led us to where they were staying, and the Citroen they had hired in Paris.

‘As a result of piecing together all of the bits of information, we knew it was only a matter of time before arrests were made.

‘And whilst it has taken four years, this case does highlight that we won’t give up. We still remain determined to identify all of those involved.’  

Celebrity Family Feud: OG Queer Eye beats The New Class after scoring points in Kardashian round


The OG Queer Eye team beat out the new Netflix crew on Sunday’s premiere of Celebrity Family Feud after scoring points in a round involving the Kardashians and plastic surgery.

The season seven premiere on ABC hosted by Steve Harvey, 63, pitted the OG Queer Eye team consisting of Ted Allen, Kyan Douglas, Thom Filicia, Carson Kressley and Jai Rodriguez against the Netflix reboot squad featuring Antoni Porowski, Tan France, Bobby Berk, Jonathan Van Ness and season four participant Wesley Hamilton.

‘Fashion savant’ Carson, 50, was captain of the OG team and he joked that it stood for ‘Old Gays’.

Season premiere: Carson Kressley and the original Queer Eye cast beat the new Netlifx crew on Sunday’s season premiere of Celebrity Family Feud on ABC

The OG team scored points during a round that revolved around a survey of 100 women who were asked ‘What kind of plastic surgery would you need to keep up with the Kardashians?’

Interior design expert Bobby Berk, 38, from The New Class buzzed in first and answered ‘booty’, which was the second most-popular answer among the six on the board.

Carson responded with ‘bosom’ and it was the top answer giving his team control.

Interior design expert Thom, 51, answered lip injections and it ranked fourth, while food and wine expert Ted, 55, responded with ‘tummy tuck’, which was the number five answer.

New class: Interior design expert Bobby Berk was head of The New Class team

New class: Interior design expert Bobby Berk was head of The New Class team

Reality stars: The teams guessed answers to the question, ''What kind of plastic surgery would you need to keep up with the Kardashians?' in reference to the famous family shown promoting Keeping Up With The Kardashians in a promo still for season 16 of the E! show

Reality stars: The teams guessed answers to the question, ”What kind of plastic surgery would you need to keep up with the Kardashians?’ in reference to the famous family shown promoting Keeping Up With The Kardashians in a promo still for season 16 of the E! show

Pop culture expert Jai, 40, then answered ‘fillers’ but got a wrong answer red ‘X’, followed by Carson who offered ‘rhinoplasty’ or nose job, but his answer also got a red ‘X’. Thom then responded with ‘cheekbones’ for their third and final ‘X’, giving control to The New Class.

Bobby after huddling with his squad answered ‘veneers’, but it received a wrong answer ‘X’ and the OG Queer Eye team won 92 points.

The last answer was ‘Every known surgery’, Steve announced to protests from the contestants.

Netflix series: The New Class squad included Bobby, Tan France, Antoni Porowski, Jonathan Van Ness and season four participant Wesley Hamilton

Netflix series: The New Class squad included Bobby, Tan France, Antoni Porowski, Jonathan Van Ness and season four participant Wesley Hamilton

Top answers: The top six answers to the Kardashian plastic surgery question are shown

Top answers: The top six answers to the Kardashian plastic surgery question are shown

Both teams were trying to be the first to reach 200 points with the winner entering the Fast Money round and its chance to win $25,000 for their preferred charity.

The New Class bounced back and scored 87 points in the next round in which they tried to guess how respondents answered the question, ‘Name something that grandma puts on grandpa in the bedroom.

The next round only had four answers for the survey, ‘Name a TV host who make you laugh out loud.’

Close game: The contest between the Queer Eye squads was even early in the game

Close game: The contest between the Queer Eye squads was even early in the game

The number one answer, of course, was Steve Harvey and the OG team stole the round after The New Class wrongly answered ‘James Corden’ for the fourth spot when the correct answer was Drew Carey.

The OG Team in the next round with point values tripled came out on top after coming up with the right answer for ‘Name something if a man forgets his wife will hold against him for the rest of his life’.

Carson sealed the win by answering ‘wedding vows’.

Top answer: Steve Harve hosted the season seven premiere and was the top  answer during one of the rounds

Top answer: Steve Harve hosted the season seven premiere and was the top  answer during one of the rounds

Good answer: The OG Team in the next round with point values tripled came out on top after Carson came up with the right answer for 'Name something if a man forgets his wife will hold against him for the rest of his life'

Good answer: The OG Team in the next round with point values tripled came out on top after Carson came up with the right answer for ‘Name something if a man forgets his wife will hold against him for the rest of his life’

Jai and Kyan teamed up for the Fast Money round in which they both had to provide answers for the same five questions and reach 200 points.

Kyan was first and earned 123 points during his round, leaving Jai to come up with 77 points for the win.

Jai was easily up to the challenge and provided four number one answers as he reached 228 points in only four questions.

Fast money: Kyan and Jai teamed up for the Fast Money round in which they both had to provide answers for the same five questions and reach 200 points

Fast money: Kyan and Jai teamed up for the Fast Money round in which they both had to provide answers for the same five questions and reach 200 points

Killed it: Jai was easily up to the challenge and provided four number one answers as he reached 228 easily

Killed it: Jai was easily up to the challenge and provided four number one answers as he reached 228 easily

Four questions: The OG Queer Eye team reached the 200-point threshold with one answer left

Four questions: The OG Queer Eye team reached the 200-point threshold with one answer left

The OG Queer Eye team played on behalf of The Trevor Project and won $25,000 for the non-profit organization focused on suicide prevention efforts among lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer and questioning youth.

Celebrity Family Feud will return next week on ABC.

The fifth season of Queer Eye will premiere on Netflix on June 5.

For charity: Everyone celebrated after the OG Queer Eye team won $25,000 for The Trevor Project

For charity: Everyone celebrated after the OG Queer Eye team won $25,000 for The Trevor Project

Airlines call for top holiday destinations to be spared 14-day quarantine rule


Ministers have been sent a list of 45 countries to prioritise for quarantine-free ‘air bridges’, it emerged last night.

Airlines drew up the index last week at the request of the Government amid mounting fury over ‘unenforceable’ plans for a 14-day quarantine imposed on all arrivals.

The list, agreed by airlines including British Airways, Easyjet and Virgin Atlantic, includes favourite holiday destinations in Europe, such as France, Italy, Spain, Portugal and Greece, along with the US and much of the Caribbean.

Last night Tory backbenchers said there was growing ‘horror’ at plans to subject visitors to the UK to blanket quarantine measures.

The full list of 45 countries that airlines want to prioritise for the quarantine-free ‘air bridges’

A senior Tory said the plans did not have the support of ‘very large parts of the Cabinet’, adding: ‘There was a case for it in March, but there isn’t a case for it now.’ Officials are drawing up proposals which could allow quarantine-free travel to places chosen for popularity and economic importance.

Airlines want the first air bridges to be set up by the end of this month ‘at the latest’, sources said, raising fresh hopes for summer holidays abroad.

The blanket quarantine, which comes into force next Monday, has been criticised by Border Force, police leaders and Tory MPs who say it is riddled with loopholes.

Whitehall sources say the Home Office and Department for Transport are moving ‘at pace’ to establish quarantine-free travel corridors between countries. An industry source told the Mail: ‘A lot of [the list] is focused on short-haul leisure – popular holiday locations and places where people might fly to see friends and family. We’d want to see as many as possible set up by the end of the month.

‘The Government requested the airlines send it in, so they could have a sense of where the volume and demand would be. It’s quite a contrast to a week and a half ago, when Downing Street played down the idea of air bridges.’ They added the proposed list depends on countries wanting to set up an air bridge with the UK and the Foreign Office will have to drop its advice against all but essential global travel.

Airline and airport bosses are due to meet Government officials tomorrow when details of the quarantine plan will be unveiled.

Dining out: Customers in Greece ¿ which is on the list ¿ this weekend

Dining out: Customers in Greece – which is on the list – this weekend

A number of Tory MPs are revolting against the quarantine plans and Sir Graham Brady – chairman of the 1922 committee of backbenchers – has told Downing Street of their concerns. He said: ‘The fundamental objection to the quarantine proposal is that it makes no sense at all to have quarantine for travel from countries that have very low rates of infection or no infection.

‘At the very least, it should be possible to exclude a number of countries on that basis. Air bridges are a very sensible proposition.’

One senior Tory said: ‘I share concerns the quarantine plan will do such huge damage to the tourism industry, without necessarily making us much safer. It feels that it’s a bit too late and a bit strong.’

An ex-minister said: ‘There is growing horror on the backbench about this. It’s several weeks since it first arose that the Government was considering quarantine and we are no further forward as to how it actually gets introduced.’

Henry Smith, Tory MP and chairman of the Future of Aviation Group, said: ‘I don’t think quarantine is appropriate to be introduced in just over a week’s time. It will prolong damage to the aviation and travel industries. It’s well intentioned but not very effective so the idea of air bridges has merit and is worthy of exploration.’  

Don’t let Britain get left behind 

By Graham Brady and Paul Maynard

A fact that may surprise many is despite being a small island nation, the UK has the third largest aviation network. We are behind only the United States and China, and the biggest in Europe.

Our world-class airlines and airports are proud to support the UK’s global connectivity and the industry contributes over a million jobs across the country.

The sheer scale of the sector, however, is impossible to realise at present as airlines have had to ground their operations.

Sir Graham Brady MP is chairman of the 1922 Committee

Paul Maynard is MP for Blackpool North & Cleveleys and is a former aviation minister

Sir Graham Brady MP (left) is chairman of the 1922 Committee and Paul Maynard MP (right) is a former aviation minister

While we are seeing other nations announce their intention to reopen their borders, the UK has appeared to turn the other way, declaring a 14-day quarantine for inbound passengers.

If this is to be implemented, it must be in place for no longer than necessary.

This is important not only for the long-term impacts on our aviation and tourism sectors but its disproportionate effect on our position as a proud trading nation.

It will be impossible to get goods to market if people are forced to self-isolate for two weeks upon arrival into the UK.

'While we are seeing other nations announce their intention to reopen their borders, the UK has appeared to turn the other way, declaring a 14-day quarantine for inbound passengers,' say Sir Graham Brady MP and Paul Maynard MP

‘While we are seeing other nations announce their intention to reopen their borders, the UK has appeared to turn the other way, declaring a 14-day quarantine for inbound passengers,’ say Sir Graham Brady MP and Paul Maynard MP

So what way forward? The Government has accepted the concept of ‘air bridges’, which would enable certain countries to travel without the need for quarantine.

UK airlines have set out 45 destinations for quarantine-free air bridges. We urge the Government to establish these as soon as possible. We cannot afford to get left behind. France and Greece have recently announced plans to drop some border controls from June 15.

The Government must be working towards an approach which can ensure public health requirements are met while allowing the industry to get back to doing what it does best – connecting goods and people and creating jobs.

There is not a second to lose.

Sir Graham Brady MP is chairman of the 1922 Committee and Paul Maynard MP is a former aviation minister

Airlines call for top holiday destinations to be spared 14-day quarantine rule


Ministers have been sent a list of 45 countries to prioritise for quarantine-free ‘air bridges’, it emerged last night.

Airlines drew up the index last week at the request of the Government amid mounting fury over ‘unenforceable’ plans for a 14-day quarantine imposed on all arrivals.

The list, agreed by airlines including British Airways, Easyjet and Virgin Atlantic, includes favourite holiday destinations in Europe, such as France, Italy, Spain, Portugal and Greece, along with the US and much of the Caribbean.

Last night Tory backbenchers said there was growing ‘horror’ at plans to subject visitors to the UK to blanket quarantine measures.

The full list of 45 countries that airlines want to prioritise for the quarantine-free ‘air bridges’

A senior Tory said the plans did not have the support of ‘very large parts of the Cabinet’, adding: ‘There was a case for it in March, but there isn’t a case for it now.’ Officials are drawing up proposals which could allow quarantine-free travel to places chosen for popularity and economic importance.

Airlines want the first air bridges to be set up by the end of this month ‘at the latest’, sources said, raising fresh hopes for summer holidays abroad.

The blanket quarantine, which comes into force next Monday, has been criticised by Border Force, police leaders and Tory MPs who say it is riddled with loopholes.

Whitehall sources say the Home Office and Department for Transport are moving ‘at pace’ to establish quarantine-free travel corridors between countries. An industry source told the Mail: ‘A lot of [the list] is focused on short-haul leisure – popular holiday locations and places where people might fly to see friends and family. We’d want to see as many as possible set up by the end of the month.

‘The Government requested the airlines send it in, so they could have a sense of where the volume and demand would be. It’s quite a contrast to a week and a half ago, when Downing Street played down the idea of air bridges.’ They added the proposed list depends on countries wanting to set up an air bridge with the UK and the Foreign Office will have to drop its advice against all but essential global travel.

Airline and airport bosses are due to meet Government officials tomorrow when details of the quarantine plan will be unveiled.

Dining out: Customers in Greece ¿ which is on the list ¿ this weekend

Dining out: Customers in Greece – which is on the list – this weekend

A number of Tory MPs are revolting against the quarantine plans and Sir Graham Brady – chairman of the 1922 committee of backbenchers – has told Downing Street of their concerns. He said: ‘The fundamental objection to the quarantine proposal is that it makes no sense at all to have quarantine for travel from countries that have very low rates of infection or no infection.

‘At the very least, it should be possible to exclude a number of countries on that basis. Air bridges are a very sensible proposition.’

One senior Tory said: ‘I share concerns the quarantine plan will do such huge damage to the tourism industry, without necessarily making us much safer. It feels that it’s a bit too late and a bit strong.’

An ex-minister said: ‘There is growing horror on the backbench about this. It’s several weeks since it first arose that the Government was considering quarantine and we are no further forward as to how it actually gets introduced.’

Henry Smith, Tory MP and chairman of the Future of Aviation Group, said: ‘I don’t think quarantine is appropriate to be introduced in just over a week’s time. It will prolong damage to the aviation and travel industries. It’s well intentioned but not very effective so the idea of air bridges has merit and is worthy of exploration.’  

Don’t let Britain get left behind 

By Graham Brady and Paul Maynard

A fact that may surprise many is despite being a small island nation, the UK has the third largest aviation network. We are behind only the United States and China, and the biggest in Europe.

Our world-class airlines and airports are proud to support the UK’s global connectivity and the industry contributes over a million jobs across the country.

The sheer scale of the sector, however, is impossible to realise at present as airlines have had to ground their operations.

Sir Graham Brady MP is chairman of the 1922 Committee

Paul Maynard is MP for Blackpool North & Cleveleys and is a former aviation minister

Sir Graham Brady MP (left) is chairman of the 1922 Committee and Paul Maynard MP (right) is a former aviation minister

While we are seeing other nations announce their intention to reopen their borders, the UK has appeared to turn the other way, declaring a 14-day quarantine for inbound passengers.

If this is to be implemented, it must be in place for no longer than necessary.

This is important not only for the long-term impacts on our aviation and tourism sectors but its disproportionate effect on our position as a proud trading nation.

It will be impossible to get goods to market if people are forced to self-isolate for two weeks upon arrival into the UK.

'While we are seeing other nations announce their intention to reopen their borders, the UK has appeared to turn the other way, declaring a 14-day quarantine for inbound passengers,' say Sir Graham Brady MP and Paul Maynard MP

‘While we are seeing other nations announce their intention to reopen their borders, the UK has appeared to turn the other way, declaring a 14-day quarantine for inbound passengers,’ say Sir Graham Brady MP and Paul Maynard MP

So what way forward? The Government has accepted the concept of ‘air bridges’, which would enable certain countries to travel without the need for quarantine.

UK airlines have set out 45 destinations for quarantine-free air bridges. We urge the Government to establish these as soon as possible. We cannot afford to get left behind. France and Greece have recently announced plans to drop some border controls from June 15.

The Government must be working towards an approach which can ensure public health requirements are met while allowing the industry to get back to doing what it does best – connecting goods and people and creating jobs.

There is not a second to lose.

Sir Graham Brady MP is chairman of the 1922 Committee and Paul Maynard MP is a former aviation minister

British ticketholder scoops £15.2million EuroMillions jackpot


British ticketholder scoops £15.2million EuroMillions jackpot – just days after another UK player won £16.5million

  • A British lottery player last night scooped the £15.2 million Euromillions jackpot
  • On Tuesday, another Briton won a half-share of that night’s £33 million jackpot
  • Each of the players has 180 days from the date of the draw to collect their prize
  • Lottery company Camelot urged players to check their tickets online or in app  

A UK player has won £15.2 million in the EuroMillions draw, Camelot said.

The winner of Friday’s jackpot comes days after another UK EuroMillions player netted £16.5 million after sharing the main prize from Tuesday’s game with a ticket-holder in France.

Andy Carter, the National Lottery senior winners’ adviser, said: ‘It’s great news for a UK ticket-holder who has scooped tonigt’s £15.2 million EuroMillions jackpot.

One British lottery player has won almost £15.3 million on last night’s Euromillions jackpot. On Tuesday, another Briton shared a £33 million jackpot with a French ticket holder

The lucky winner has 180 days in which to claim their massive jackpot

The lucky winner has 180 days in which to claim their massive jackpot

Players are urged to check their tickets online or with the National Lottery App to see if they have scooped last night's jackpot

Players are urged to check their tickets online or with the National Lottery App to see if they have scooped last night’s jackpot

‘This winner follows hot on the heels of Tuesday’s UK jackpot winner who won a massive £16.5 million – which is still waiting to be claimed.

‘Players are urged to check their tickets online to see if they are one of The National Lottery’s latest big winners – The National Lottery results are always available on the website and via the National Lottery App.’

He said that people have 180 days to check their tickets, meaning the prize can be claimed until November 25.

The winning main EuroMillions numbers were 04, 08, 11, 19 and, 46. The Lucky Star numbers were 04 and 08.

The ticket-holder matched all of the numbers to take home the top prize.

Tuesday’s jackpot is an estimated £15 million.

As well as the person winning £15.3 million, two Britons scooped more than £74,000 for matching five numbers and one star while there was also one UK Millionaire Maker

As well as the person winning £15.3 million, two Britons scooped more than £74,000 for matching five numbers and one star while there was also one UK Millionaire Maker

British ticketholder scoops £15.2million EuroMillions jackpot


British ticketholder scoops £15.2million EuroMillions jackpot – just days after another UK player won £16.5million

  • A British lottery player last night scooped the £15.2 million Euromillions jackpot
  • On Tuesday, another Briton won a half-share of that night’s £33 million jackpot
  • Each of the players has 180 days from the date of the draw to collect their prize
  • Lottery company Camelot urged players to check their tickets online or in app  

A UK player has won £15.2 million in the EuroMillions draw, Camelot said.

The winner of Friday’s jackpot comes days after another UK EuroMillions player netted £16.5 million after sharing the main prize from Tuesday’s game with a ticket-holder in France.

Andy Carter, the National Lottery senior winners’ adviser, said: ‘It’s great news for a UK ticket-holder who has scooped tonigt’s £15.2 million EuroMillions jackpot.

One British lottery player has won almost £15.3 million on last night’s Euromillions jackpot. On Tuesday, another Briton shared a £33 million jackpot with a French ticket holder

The lucky winner has 180 days in which to claim their massive jackpot

The lucky winner has 180 days in which to claim their massive jackpot

Players are urged to check their tickets online or with the National Lottery App to see if they have scooped last night's jackpot

Players are urged to check their tickets online or with the National Lottery App to see if they have scooped last night’s jackpot

‘This winner follows hot on the heels of Tuesday’s UK jackpot winner who won a massive £16.5 million – which is still waiting to be claimed.

‘Players are urged to check their tickets online to see if they are one of The National Lottery’s latest big winners – The National Lottery results are always available on the website and via the National Lottery App.’

He said that people have 180 days to check their tickets, meaning the prize can be claimed until November 25.

The winning main EuroMillions numbers were 04, 08, 11, 19 and, 46. The Lucky Star numbers were 04 and 08.

The ticket-holder matched all of the numbers to take home the top prize.

Tuesday’s jackpot is an estimated £15 million.

As well as the person winning £15.3 million, two Britons scooped more than £74,000 for matching five numbers and one star while there was also one UK Millionaire Maker

As well as the person winning £15.3 million, two Britons scooped more than £74,000 for matching five numbers and one star while there was also one UK Millionaire Maker

Auction reveals story of British WWI captain’s who helped the White Army during Russian civil war


The extraordinary story of a British First World War captain who became an unlikely cult hero as he fought the communist Bolsheviks during the Russian Civil War has come to light after his medals and photographs sold for £7,500. 

Captain William Richardson was flung into the conflict along with other Allied war veterans after troops were sent to Russia in support of the Imperial White Army in their civil war against the Bolsheviks in 1919.  

Many British forces, as well as troops from France, U.S and Japan, had been sent to join the fight against the Red Army in 1918 in a bid to re-establish the Eastern Front. 

The collection of images and medals belonging to Captain William Richardson, pictured in traditional Russian clothing, told the story of his involvement in the Russian Civil War, fighting alongside the White Army against the communist Bolsheviks before his death in 1920, aged 37

Richardson was 31 when the war broke out, serving for two years in Borneo and Hong Kong before joining the fight in Russia in 1918 after Allied forces were forced to intervene in a bid to prevent the spread of communism

Richardson was 31 when the war broke out, serving for two years in Borneo and Hong Kong before joining the fight in Russia in 1918 after Allied forces were forced to intervene in a bid to prevent the spread of communism 

The incredible collection of photographs  documenting the Birmingham-born soldier’s time in the conflict show him adopting the Russian military lifestyle wearing a traditional Russian hat and a large fur coat. 

Captain Richardson was lauded by the anti-communist Cossacks, who sometimes fought independently and sometimes as a faction of the White Army, and decorated him for his outstanding service to their cause.     

The war hero served in southern Russia and earned the respect of the locals for helping to train and equip their soldiers.

When he died suddenly of pneumonia aged 37 in 1920 his death was mourned by the Cossacks and the residents of the area of the Black Sea port of Novo Rossisk he helped defend. 

His archive, which includes the Russian Imperial Order of St Anne and five photo albums containing images from his travels across the globe, sold at auction in London.

Captain William Richardson's Russian Order of St Anne Civil Division and Order of St Anne Military Division medals

Captain William Richardson's Order of St Stanislas medal

Captain William Richardson gained many accolades for his services, including Russian Order of St Anne Civil Division (left), Order of St Anne Military Division (centre) and Order of St Stanislas medal (right)

A pair of Russian officer's epaulettes feature in the collection

Captain William Richardson's Memorial Plaque and British War and Victory medals 1914-19

The collection includes a Russian officer’s epaulettes (left) and Captain William’s Memorial Plaque and British War and Victory medals (right)

The British First World War hero was lauded by the anti-Communist Cossacks who decorated him for his service to their cause

The British First World War hero was lauded by the anti-Communist Cossacks who decorated him for his service to their cause

Why did Allied forces intervene in the Russian Civil War? 

In November 1917 the Russian Civil War broke out as several factions fought for the power to determine the country’s political future. 

The socialist Bolshevik party, led by Vladimir Lenin, had overthrown the provisional government as different groups battled for control. 

The two largest groups involved in the fighting were the communist Red Army, and the White Army, which favoured capitalism and monarchism. 

The White Army was a union of anti-Bolshevik groups, including peasant militias, the Black Army (Ukrainian anarchists) and other groups fighting for their state’s independence from the Russian Empire, led by Tsarist officers. 

The war continued until June 1923 with 13 foreign nations joining the fight against the Red Army. 

Troops from Russia’s former allies in the First World War, including U.K, U.S, France and Japan, intervened.

The countries were forced to get involved after the Bolsheviks pulled out of the world war in March 1918, signing the Treaty of Brest-Litovsk which saw them giving over territory to Germany.

In the peace deal, Ukraine, Georgia and Finland were granted independence from Russia, Poland, Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia were handed over to Germany and Austria-Hungary and Kars, Ardahan and Batum were given to Turkey.  

The loss of territory weakened the Allied forces and they were forced to intervene in order to re-establish the Eastern Front.

The peace deal also left pro-Allied Czechoslovak Region stuck in Russia and opened up the opportunity for Germany to make use of Russian equipment. 

As well as sending forces, the countries provided parts of the White Army with financial support in a bid to stop the spread of communism across Europe. 

A year after entering the fight, the French withdrew their troops in March and April 1919, closely followed by British soldiers leaving the Arkhangelsk and Murmansk areas in the autumn of that year. and South Russia in 1920.

In 1919 the Red Army had defeated the White Army in Ukraine. 

Fighting continued in pockets for two years afterwards, including a battle in Crimea which saw the Civil War draw to a close in November 1920. 

The war was eventually ended when the Bolsheviks assured communist control of the new Soviet Union in 1923. 

The images include photos of Hong Kong during the First World War, where he served, and a huge crocodile he shot while he was stationed in Borneo in 1918.

A spokesman for auctioneers Spink and Son said: ‘The awards of Captain Richardson soared above their estimate of £2,800.

‘His remarkable photographic archive gave a unique insight into the final days of the Russian Empire and his career previous to that was action packed.’

The decorated veteran was aged 31 when the First World War broke out and joined the Royal Warwickshire Regiment before he was commissioned as an officer and transferred to the Middlesex Regiment.

Among the images is a shot of a crocodile Captain Richardson shot while stationed in Borneo in 1918

Among the images is a shot of a crocodile Captain Richardson shot while stationed in Borneo in 1918

The war veteran took pictures of his travels which feature in the collection that sold for £7,500, including images of Hong Kong during the First World War

The war veteran took pictures of his travels which feature in the collection that sold for £7,500, including images of Hong Kong during the First World War

After the Allied intervention in Russia his battalion arrived at the city of Vladivostock in August 1918. He was wounded in 1919 and died the following year aged 37.

A letter sent to Capt Richardson’s widow also formed part of the archive that sold. 

It was sent by Captain G. N. Wood of the 1st Battalion, Dorset Regiment who worked alongside Capt Richardson.

He wrote: ‘As a friend of Captain Richardson, I feel that I must write to you to express my very deepest sympathy in your great sorrow.

‘I first met Captain Richardson on the journey to Russia, and though our acquaintance was short, a very real friendship existed between us.

‘As I was the only other Englishman with him at the time of his illness, I can give you some particulars which you might be glad to know.

‘Your husband and I had been working together for a fortnight in the mountains, north of Novo Rossisk on the preparation of a line of defences.

‘The weather was extremely cold, and was probably the cause of his sudden illness. The Cossacks were most kind to him and did everything possible for him.

Before he was stationed in Russia to fight alongside the White Army, he was stationed in Hong Kong and Borneo for two years

Before he was stationed in Russia to fight alongside the White Army, he was stationed in Hong Kong and Borneo for two years

His photo archive was sold for thousands at an auction in London held by Spink and Son, including this image taken in Hong Kong

His photo archive was sold for thousands at an auction in London held by Spink and Son, including this image taken in Hong Kong

‘All the Russians with whom we were working, and the villagers, were most distressed at Capt. Richardson’s illness and I had many enquiries and expressions of sympathy from them.’

Before heading to Russia, Richardson had served for two years on the Western Front in the First World War.

In February 1917 he survived the sinking of a troopship bound for Hong Kong after it struck a German mine off South Africa.

The incident is best remembered for the stoicism of the 1,000 troops and 30 officers who waited patiently to be evacuated from the SS Tyndareus as it began sinking in heavy seas.

Before being rescued the men lined up for a roll call and sang ‘It’s a Long Way to Tipperary’ while they waited for help to arrive.

Every single man was saved and the rescue received praise from King George V.

After the Tyndareus incident, Capt Richardson was appointed provost-marshal of the detention barracks in Hong Kong. 

A depiction of the crew standing to attention, waiting to be rescued, as the SS Tyndareus, bound for Hong Kong, sunk in 1917

A depiction of the crew standing to attention, waiting to be rescued, as the SS Tyndareus, bound for Hong Kong, sunk in 1917

Auction reveals story of British WWI captain’s who helped the White Army during Russian civil war


The extraordinary story of a British First World War captain who became an unlikely cult hero as he fought the communist Bolsheviks during the Russian Civil War has come to light after his medals and photographs sold for £7,500. 

Captain William Richardson was flung into the conflict along with other Allied war veterans after troops were sent to Russia in support of the Imperial White Army in the wake of the communist revolution.

British forces, as well as other Allied troops from France, U.S and Japan, had been sent to join the fight against the Bolshevik Red Army in 1918 in a bid to re-establish the Eastern Front. 

The collection of images and medals belonging to Captain William Richardson, pictured in traditional Russian clothing, told the story of his involvement in the Russian Civil War, fighting alongside the White Army against the communist Bolsheviks before his death in 1920, aged 37

Richardson was 31 when the war broke out, serving for two years in Borneo and Hong Kong before joining the fight in Russia in 1918 after Allied forces were forced to intervene in a bid to prevent the spread of communism

Richardson was 31 when the war broke out, serving for two years in Borneo and Hong Kong before joining the fight in Russia in 1918 after Allied forces were forced to intervene in a bid to prevent the spread of communism 

The incredible collection of photographs  documenting the Birmingham-born soldier’s time in the conflict show him adopting the Russian military lifestyle wearing a traditional Russian hat and a large fur coat. 

Captain Richardson was lauded by the anti-communist Cossacks, who sometimes fought independently and sometimes as a faction of the White Army, and decorated him for his outstanding service to their cause.     

The war hero served in southern Russia and earned the respect of the locals for helping to train and equip their soldiers.

When he died suddenly of pneumonia aged 37 in 1920 his death was mourned by the Cossacks and the residents of the area of the Black Sea port of Novo Rossisk he helped defend. 

His archive, which includes the Russian Imperial Order of St Anne and five photo albums containing images from his travels across the globe, sold at auction in London.

Captain William Richardson's Russian Order of St Anne Civil Division and Order of St Anne Military Division medals

Captain William Richardson's Order of St Stanislas medal

Captain William Richardson gained many accolades for his services, including Russian Order of St Anne Civil Division (left), Order of St Anne Military Division (centre) and Order of St Stanislas medal (right)

A pair of Russian officer's epaulettes feature in the collection

Captain William Richardson's Memorial Plaque and British War and Victory medals 1914-19

The collection includes a Russian officer’s epaulettes (left) and Captain William’s Memorial Plaque and British War and Victory medals (right)

The British First World War hero was lauded by the anti-Communist Cossacks who decorated him for his service to their cause

The British First World War hero was lauded by the anti-Communist Cossacks who decorated him for his service to their cause

Why did Allied forces intervene in the Russian Civil War? 

In November 1917 the Russian Civil War broke out as several factions fought for the power to determine the country’s political future. 

The socialist Bolshevik party, led by Vladimir Lenin, had overthrown the provisional government as different groups battled for control. 

The two largest groups involved in the fighting were the communist Red Army, and the White Army, which favoured capitalism and monarchism. 

The White Army was a union of anti-Bolshevik groups, including peasant militias, the Black Army (Ukrainian anarchists) and other groups fighting for their state’s independence from the Russian Empire, led by Tsarist officers. 

The war continued until June 1923 with 13 foreign nations joining the fight against the Red Army. 

Troops from Russia’s former allies in the First World War, including U.K, U.S, France and Japan, intervened.

The countries were forced to get involved after the Bolsheviks pulled out of the world war in March 1918, signing the Treaty of Brest-Litovsk which saw them giving over territory to Germany.

In the peace deal, Ukraine, Georgia and Finland were granted independence from Russia, Poland, Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia were handed over to Germany and Austria-Hungary and Kars, Ardahan and Batum were given to Turkey.  

The loss of territory weakened the Allied forces and they were forced to intervene in order to re-establish the Eastern Front.

The peace deal also left pro-Allied Czechoslovak Region stuck in Russia and opened up the opportunity for Germany to make use of Russian equipment. 

As well as sending forces, the countries provided parts of the White Army with financial support in a bid to stop the spread of communism across Europe.

The intervention was relatively small, involving around 200,000 soldiers from across the globe. 

A year after entering the fight, the French withdrew their troops in March and April 1919, closely followed by British soldiers leaving the Arkhangelsk and Murmansk areas in the autumn of that year. and South Russia in 1920.

In 1919 the Red Army had defeated the White Army in Ukraine and Serbia. Fighting continued in pockets for two years afterwards, including a battle in Crimea which saw the Civil War draw to a close in November 1920. 

The war was eventually ended when the Bolsheviks assured communist control of the new Soviet Union in 1923. 

The images include photos of Hong Kong during the First World War, where he served, and a huge crocodile he shot while he was stationed in Borneo in 1918.

A spokesman for auctioneers Spink and Son said: ‘The awards of Captain Richardson soared above their estimate of £2,800.

‘His remarkable photographic archive gave a unique insight into the final days of the Russian Empire and his career previous to that was action packed.’

The decorated veteran was aged 31 when the First World War broke out and joined the Royal Warwickshire Regiment before he was commissioned as an officer and transferred to the Middlesex Regiment.

Among the images is a shot of a crocodile Captain Richardson shot while stationed in Borneo in 1918

Among the images is a shot of a crocodile Captain Richardson shot while stationed in Borneo in 1918

The war veteran took pictures of his travels which feature in the collection that sold for £7,500, including images of Hong Kong during the First World War

The war veteran took pictures of his travels which feature in the collection that sold for £7,500, including images of Hong Kong during the First World War

After the Allied intervention in Russia his battalion arrived at the city of Vladivostock in August 1918. He was wounded in 1919 and died the following year aged 37.

A letter sent to Capt Richardson’s widow also formed part of the archive that sold. 

It was sent by Captain G. N. Wood of the 1st Battalion, Dorset Regiment who worked alongside Capt Richardson.

He wrote: ‘As a friend of Captain Richardson, I feel that I must write to you to express my very deepest sympathy in your great sorrow.

‘I first met Captain Richardson on the journey to Russia, and though our acquaintance was short, a very real friendship existed between us.

‘As I was the only other Englishman with him at the time of his illness, I can give you some particulars which you might be glad to know.

‘Your husband and I had been working together for a fortnight in the mountains, north of Novo Rossisk on the preparation of a line of defences.

‘The weather was extremely cold, and was probably the cause of his sudden illness. The Cossacks were most kind to him and did everything possible for him.

Before he was stationed in Russia to fight alongside the White Army, he was stationed in Hong Kong and Borneo for two years

Before he was stationed in Russia to fight alongside the White Army, he was stationed in Hong Kong and Borneo for two years

His photo archive was sold for thousands at an auction in London held by Spink and Son, including this image taken in Hong Kong

His photo archive was sold for thousands at an auction in London held by Spink and Son, including this image taken in Hong Kong

‘All the Russians with whom we were working, and the villagers, were most distressed at Capt. Richardson’s illness and I had many enquiries and expressions of sympathy from them.’

Before heading to Russia, Richardson had served for two years on the Western Front in the First World War.

In February 1917 he survived the sinking of a troopship bound for Hong Kong after it struck a German mine off South Africa.

The incident is best remembered for the stoicism of the 1,000 troops and 30 officers who waited patiently to be evacuated from the SS Tyndareus as it began sinking in heavy seas.

Before being rescued the men lined up for a roll call and sang ‘It’s a Long Way to Tipperary’ while they waited for help to arrive.

Every single man was saved and the rescue received praise from King George V.

After the Tyndareus incident, Capt Richardson was appointed provost-marshal of the detention barracks in Hong Kong. 

A depiction of the crew standing to attention, waiting to be rescued, as the SS Tyndareus, bound for Hong Kong, sunk in 1917

A depiction of the crew standing to attention, waiting to be rescued, as the SS Tyndareus, bound for Hong Kong, sunk in 1917